bison kill

  • YA dystopian be like: My name is Shellfish, I walk impoverished streets with my trusty pickax ready to kill unsuspecting bison to feed my beautiful glittering perfect little sister Lovelake, who’s so pure for a family that’s too sad to function. By chance I was thrust into my world’s upper class and forced to smear heavy makeup on my face and wear jewels the size of my face all over finely woven silk clothes. With my newfound royalty I start a bloody war with my Special unexplainable abilities so I can live happily with Lettuce, my childhood friend who never got over me after I fed him that one time

My name is Shellfish, I walk impoverished streets with my trusty pickax ready to kill unsuspecting bison to feed my beautiful glittering perfect little sister Lovelake, who’s so pure for a family that’s too sad to function. By chance I was thrust into my world’s upper class and forced to smear heavy makeup on my face and wear jewels the size of my face all over finely woven silk clothes. With my newfound royalty I start a bloody war with my Special unexplainable abilities so I can live happily with Lettuce, my childhood friend who never got over me after I fed him that one time

1870s: A pile of American Bison skulls, waiting to be ground up for fertilizer. More than 50 million Bisons were killed by the invading Europeans, both for fertilizer and due to the fact that they were a main food source for the Native Americans. Killing them arguably aided in the genocide and slaughter of the indigenous people.

Gray Wolfs on the Yellowstone River March 24 2015 15:06
As winter is ending Male Grizzly bears wake up early and search for winter killed Bison that have fallen or drowned in the river. The Bears drag them to edge and eat their fill and guard the precious meal. But when they blink or even when they are busy chasing another bear away. Wolfs come in and grab a quick meal. Gray wolfs are most comfortable and active in the hardest part of the Yellowstone winter.

Photo by @michaelnicknichols // I spent 14 months photographing in Yellowstone for the coming May 2016 issues of National Geographic Magazine.
We had a team to cover the many sides and issues in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem and @ronan_donovan was our wolf photographer. Ronan was sitting next to me and made a much better image that appears as a double page in the magazine. @drewtrush our mountain lion photographer was guarding us in case a grizzly came from a direction we could not see. Guarding us with Bear spray and his eyes .. the best deterrent after the essential number of 3 humans.

Will post images @michaelnicknichols and @natgeo #yellowstone #yellowstonenationalpark #nationalgeographic #nationalpark by natgeo

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The Hudson-Meng Bison Kill Site:

In the year 1954 in rural northwest Nebraska, two ranchers named Bill Hudson and Albert Meng were digging a pond when they uncovered a mass of bones. Archaeologist Larry Agenbroad was brought in to investigate soon after. What began as a few square meters of bones was revealed through excavations to be a massive bonebed of Bison Antiquus (about 25% larger than modern day bison, they could grow as tall as 7.5 ft at the shoulder). While only a small portion of the bone bed has been left open for viewers, taken in its entirety the bed is larger than a football field. 

Located on the Oglala National Grasslands, the site sits on a windswept moor. Erosion, lack of tree cover, and the swift moving storms of the plains give the place a vulnerable feeling. That feeling is fitting for the site, as it is currently struggling for funding to remain open.