So I commented on a post about menstrual cups on Facebook and how I loved mine before I had to stop using it once I got my IUD

My mom: u shouldn’t talk about your birth control and menstrual cup. It’s too TMI.
Me: HOW BOUT I DO ANYWAY.


It shouldn’t be taboo to talk about birth control and menstruation.

There are way more personal things that I could choose to disclose on the internet, but don’t because I don’t feel like it. The above is something I have no issues with because A) Menstruation and everything associated with it is a FUCKING NATURAL PART OF LIFE and B) We SHOULD be talking about birth control. I’m not ashamed that I’m on birth control. It’s called being a goddamn adult and making informed decisions about my health.

3

Abortion rates hit historic lows, according to new report

  • Once again, statistics suggest that abortion rates drop as access to contraception improves.
  • New data from the Guttmacher Institute show abortion rates are at their lowest point since 1973’s Roe v. Wade decision, NPR reported Tuesday. 
  • The report shows that in 2014, 14.6 abortions were performed for every 1,000 women aged 15 to 44. 
  • That’s down from when abortion became legal in 1973, when the rate was 16.3 abortions for every 1,000 women.
  • Planned Parenthood president Cecile Richards chalked up the dip to readily available contraception.
  • “It shows that we’re finally doing a better job of helping women get access to birth control that’s affordable and that’s high-quality,” Richards told NPR. Read more
What the House Vote to Repeal Obamacare Means for Planned Parenthood

Congress Is a Step Closer to Repealing the Affordable Care Act and ‘Defunding’ Planned Parenthood. Here’s What the Bill Actually Does, and How to Fight Back.

On May 4, the U.S. House voted to pass the worst bill for women’s health in a generation: the American Health Care Act (AHCA). This bill not only seeks to repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA), but also to “defund” Planned Parenthood by blocking Medicaid patients from care at its health centers. 

As the bill heads to the Senate, here’s what it actually does — and what it doesn’t do.

What Thursday’s Vote Did NOT Do

  • It didn’t become law.
    The ACA repeal bill passed the House by a narrow margin, and now it faces an uphill battle in the Senate. We can expect more changes to the bill that will impact women’s health.
  • It didn’t close Planned Parenthood.
    All Planned Parenthood health centers are open as usual, and staff are doing what they’ve always done: getting up in the morning; opening the health center doors; and providing high-quality, affordable health care to all people who need it. That includes patients who rely on Medicaid coverage.
  • It didn’t cancel your insurance.
    The benefits of the ACA are still here for you, even if you’re 26 or younger and on your parents’ plan. In fact, the majority of people can still purchase a plan for $75 or less. If you have health care coverage, it is still in effect until there is an actual change in the law, which takes time. So, make your medical appointments, and get the care you deserve and are entitled to under the law.

What the AHCA Threatens to Do to Women’s Health

In particular, the AHCA would:

  • Take away health coverage for 24 million people

  • “Defund” Planned Parenthood by blocking people who rely on Medicaid from accessing preventive care at its health centers — including birth control, cancer screenings, and STD testing and treatment

  • Reduce access to no-cost preventive services, including birth control

  • End protections that keep insurers from charging people with pre-existing conditions unaffordable rates — allowing insurance companies to once again charge people tens of thousands of dollars a month because they had cancer

  • Impose a nationwide ban on private insurance coverage of abortion

  • Undermine Essential Health Benefits — including maternity coverage and prescription drugs, which disproportionately affect women.

  • Gut the Medicaid program, which approximately 1 in 4 women of reproductive age rely on to access no-cost, critical reproductive health care (such as birth control, lifesaving cancer screenings, and maternity care)

4 Ways to Fight Back Now

Infuriated? You’re not alone. Here are the top three ways to stand up for health care and stand with Planned Parenthood right now.

#1: Call Your Senators
This is the most important way to take action right now. Use our easy online form to call your U.S. senators. We’ll give you a script so you can tell them to protect health care and stand with Planned Parenthood.

#2: Tag Your Senators on Facebook
Do you notice when somebody tags you on Facebook? Chances are,  your answer is “yes” — and that goes for your senators, too. Our simple form automatically tags your senators and gives you time to edit the post.

#3: Tweet at Your Senators
If you have Twitter, take a moment to tweet at your senators. Our easy-to-use form automatically finds your senators’ handles. It also gives you a sample tweet if you don’t want to write your own.

#4: Tweet at Reps who Voted Against Women’s Health
Click on the link above and scroll own for our list of representatives who voted in favor of this dangerous bill. If you see your House member, tell them you will not forget that they stripped access to care — and will not forgive.


The Trump administration’s top family planning official doesn’t think birth control works

  • Trump will reportedly be appointing not one but two vocal abortion opponents to the Department of Health and Human Services.
  • According to Politico, Teresa Manning — a law professor and anti-choice, anti-contraception activist — will be named deputy assistant secretary in the Office of Population Affairs, which delegates Title X funds to family planning initiatives. 
  • The appointment hasn’t been formally made yet, but according to Politico, “several sources” have confirmed it.
  • Manning, formerly Wagner, has worked both for the National Right to Life Committee and the Family Research Council, and has written a book on the “pro-life movement." 
  • She has used her platform to prop up medically inaccurate claims about the purported link between breast cancer and abortion, which medical experts agree does not exist. 
  • She has also argued at length against emergency contraception. In a 2003 interview with WBUR Boston Manning said the above about contraception in general. Read more (5/1/17)

Scientists just discovered a “universal contraceptive” made from chemical compounds

  • The birth control of the future has arrived.
  • Researchers at University of California, Berkeley recently figured out how to solve some of the most common problems posed by traditional birth control methods by targeting the mechanism that powers sperm’s “drilling” capabilities.
  • That mechanism — or “power kick” — as scientists like to call it, is known as Catsper, an ion channel that activates once sperm gets close to an egg.
  • According to Wired, UC Berkeley researchers tested over 50 chemical compounds to find a way to turn off sperm’s “power kick” and discovered two potential solutions: lupeol and pristimerin. Read more (5/17/17)

follow @the-future-now

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Economic security can’t be achieved without reproductive freedom.

In order for women to participate as full citizens in society and have the same economic opportunities, we must have paid family leave and access to affordable birth control and abortion care.

A majority of men say they haven’t benefited from women’s access to birth control

  • It seems some men are having a hard time finding it in themselves to fight for women’s reproductive rights because, well, they’re having a hard time seeing how it makes their own lives better.
  • A new survey from public opinion research firm PerryUndem found that just 37% of men say they have personally benefited from women’s access to affordable birth control, while 52% say they’ve never reaped such benefits. Read more (3/23/17)
3

i’ve been very displeased with events recently. Just because a certain type of heathcare isn’t directly related to everyone doesn’t mean it shouldn’t be included. You wouldn’t say that insulin shouldn’t be covered because not everyone has diabetes right? well the same goes for birth control(and its numerous reasons for use) and women’s healthcare in general. 

The US would save $12 billion a year if every woman had access to birth control

  • Giving people access to birth control isn’t just a necessary step toward securing reproductive justice — it’s cost effective, too.
  • A new study from Child Trends commissioned by the Planned Parenthood Action Fund found that if every woman in the United States had access to the most effective birth control possible, it could save as much as $12 billion a year in health care costs.
  • The domino effect goes like this: 
    • A lack of access to birth control means more unwanted pregnancies. 
    • More unwanted pregnancies usually lead to “negative pregnancy-related behaviors,” like smoking during pregnancy or delaying prenatal care, researchers wrote. 
    • And these negative behaviors, in turn, create poor health outcomes for both mother and child, which ends up costing billions in public health care dollars. Read more (3/8/17 11:35 AM)

Women are fertile only a few days a month up until they’re like 50 years old , while men are fertile every single day until the day they die basically, producing millions of sperm per hour. Yet women are the ones taking pills, putting in IUDs, sponges, patches and what have yous, increasing the risk of blod clots, strokes and breast cancer , experiencing side effects such as heavy cramping, urinary tract infections, cervical inflammation and irregular spotting to name a few.

For like 4 days a month. 

hmm…