bird or prey

barbara gordon is canonically

  • a disabled woman, 
  • an intersectional feminist, 
  • one of the smartest members of the batfamily, 
  • and the leader of a badass all-female superhero team, 

and it breaks my heart that she’s probably going to be reduced to “cute girl who punches bad guys and makes jokes and has a crush on nightwing” in joss whedon’s batgirl movie. 

10

Famous Superhero Teams + Year of their 1st appearance

Honorable Mentions: Justice Society of America 1940, Legions of Superheroes 1958, Teen Titans 1964, X Force 1991, Birds of Prey 1995, The Authority 1999, The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen 1999, Justice League Dark 2011, Legends of Tomorrow 2016.

Need something to get you through Monday? Here’s a pic of an adorable clutch of baby peregrine falcons on banding day at Cabrillo National Monument in California. At birth, peregrine chicks weigh about 1.5 ounces, but they grow quickly – they can double their weight in just six days. They reach nearly full size after only seven weeks. Cool fact about peregrine falcons: They are among the fastest birds, flying at up to 55 mph and diving at more than 200 mph when striking avian prey in mid-air. Photo by National Park Service.

Catching prey using Vortices

I was reading about Vortices and after hours of research online, out of the blue I stumbled upon this amazing bird. This is the Red Necked Phalarope and from the looks of it seems to have put vortices to a really productive use - catching its prey.

By rotating around ~60-80 times a minute, it produces an upward vortex that sucks out insects/bugs/crustaceans from the water, which it swiftly picks up with its beak and eats. ( This one would have aced the Fluids class for sure :D)

This is analogous to tornadoes sweeping up cars and houses along its way in an upward swirl.

Mind Blown!

** The actual dynamics of vortices of course is waay more complicated. ;)

*** There are three species of phalarope (red-necked, red/grey, and Wilson’s), and they can all feed like that.            

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Barn Owl (Tyto albaby Beth Phifer

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Barred Owl (Strix variaby Steve Large