bird anatomy

anonymous asked:

Hello!! This may be a weird question but I too am heavily interested in birds but unlike you, I cannot draw them as well. :,^( If it's not too much work (if it is just ignore this, i don't mind), do you know of any good references or sources to learn more about birds from facts to anatomy? I know this is a pretty wide range so again, I totally understand if you can't! I just thought it was worth an ask. Thank you so much!!

i don’t really have any specific reference places but here’s some things i do. 

 drawing birds is arguably one of the hardest animals because of their feathers. unlike fat and fur that folds to the body in a way that’s usually readable to whats underneath, feathers sort of create a ‘bubble’ around the body which makes a lot of body parts indistinguishable to where one ends and another begins. so its important to always think in terms of skeletal anatomy:

birds are dinosaurs and therefore reptiles. looking at birds this way, it’s a lot easier to see their evolution.

with that in mind, say we wanna draw this dude. owls are pretty tough because their outward appearances are so deceiving.

we’ve got a neutral pose, feathers are generously surrounding most of the body so its no sweat, we don’t really know whats going on. but we can hide it. but now we want to make him move and look cool. without really knowing whats going on we might get stuck on something like this:

its always kind of stiff and frustratingly unrealistic. mostly this is because we just don’t have enough knowledge of the skeletal structure to work with. eyeballing anatomy on our first drawing might get something like the left, more than anything people aren’t generous enough with leginess of birds:

 owls do indeed have regular proportioned necks with the rest of their bodies. and their skulls are like that of any other stereotypical raptor under their mask of feathers (minus their freaky eye sockets and ears)) they can open their mouths wide just like a hawk or eagle can. it’s important to remember that birds with large wingspans do not magically lose their length when hidden. they are just conveniently folded in against their bodies.

knowing this we can try again. suddenly things seem to click in place more and have a believable-ness to them.

the rule of thumb for most birds is they have less body mass and more leg/neck than one thinks. they are lanky dinosaurs.

when we are looking at this:

we are seeing this:

with that rule, drawing birds becomes a lot less confusing. with practice you might just eyeball their feathered appearances but if not, going back to skeletal/muscle structure gives the base you need to draw convincing birds.

when it comes to specific body parts, the most challenging part for me personally have always been feet. birds with super twiggy feet are easier because one line per toe is easy to get away with. but when you get to birds with meatier feet, especially raptors, it gets difficult. my way of getting around this is to think of the actual ‘feet’ last. drawing each separate toe first gets confusing because you just find yourself trying to get them to each fit evenly together at the base of the foot. one always seems kind of skinnier or fatter than the others in my experiences, and by the time you correct it the gesture gets muddled and lost.

so i just skip that part until later, i draw talon first.

perhaps this is very unorthodox, but just like artists might square in the hands first on a human before working out the arms, i square in the talons to know where i want them before worrying how they go on exactly.

that way we have a clear gesture captured, and in my experience it is much more readable.

thats’ really all i can think of now in terms of my techniques, i hope this helps :V

3

The Silent Flying of an Owl. 

The video shows how effortlessly an owl fly’s compared to other bird species. 

A pigeon that has a relatively large body and small wings needs to flap furiously to produce enough lift. A falcon has large wings that move more aggressively so the bird can gain much faster speeds. 

Both birds create large turbulence in the air and noise as a result. Comparatively, the owl is the perfect night time hunter, silently flying through the sky.

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Downy woodpecker (Picoides pubsecens) anatomy

Drawn for my colleagues. On the left, the axial skeleton + pectoral girdle (without any limbs) and the longis colli: the primary muscle responsible for woodpecker drumming. As you might expect, it’s much larger in woodpeckers than other birds.

On the right: all of the above, plus the ol’ pectoralis major, responsible for the downstroke/powerstroke in bird flight.

I will eventually shade the rest of the skeleton.

After @maverick-ornithography remarked on the unusual appearance of the shopping cart I saw the other day, I decided to check at various stores to understand whether this was an isolated phenomenon. Here are the results.

Tesco : has both regular shopping carts (large, low basket, with a child seat) and “leggy” ones (small basket, long and strangely balanced legs, no child seat). Pictures of both varieties below.

In the background of both pictures, you can see a vehicle carrying exclusively “leggy” carts (I didn’t take a closer picture because I wasn’t sure I was allowed to).

Lidl : same situation, with both regular and “leggy” carts, except that here, the relation between cart types is clearer (the regular type still looks strangely balanced to me, and the leg structure is similar). Pictures :


Dealz : only leggy carts ! The variety is yet a different one, and the only cart type with a drawer system for coins I saw today (the others have a slit system). Here is a picture :


This allows me to confirm that the overturned cart in the ditch thing is indeed a Lidl “leggy” cart, like the one I saw on the road close to it (notice the shape of the legs) :


To conclude this long post, I saw the heron and the egret again !

(A grey heron and a little egret standing in some kind of evergreen, 1 m or less from each other, the heron facing the camera and the egret facing right.)

This is the tree where I saw the heron the other day ; I was already surprised to see the egret in it, and I didn’t expect the heron to be that close, so I completely missed it until it moved its head.

(Same image, but with the heron facing right and the egret running its beak under its wing.)

The egret started preening, so I assumed it wasn’t particularly uncomfortable despite the proximity of the heron, but it might not mean that at all (I would be interested if anyone knows what might have been going on, I was surprised because most grey herons I have seen seemed very territorial).

anonymous asked:

how to anatomy please explain i demand it

Something like this. You can add nicer hair or a beard.

2

The bone that looks like a breast plate here is called a keel and this is a common loon 🍬

Hello! I work for my school’s natural history collections so I understand all the laws and have all the permits I need to care for my dead things. This piece is not a personal collection piece, but the schools.

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This is a “Penguin rover” used to study Emperor penguins in Antarctica.

It’s equipped with a spy cam to assist in studying these shy animals. Researchers found that approaching these emperor penguins normally would result in their heart rates rising, producing unreliable data.

This rover works very well, enough to even entice communication from the penguins. According to researchers the penguins were “very disappointed” when the rover didn’t respond, prompting the researchers to plan to have the rover playing penguin songs on it’s next trip.

(Via Cnet, Nature)

skyreigning replied to your photo: Trying to understand bird anatomy, ft. mainly…

Owls are beautiful how dare u

Have you seen what an owl looks like under all those feathers? Let me demonstrate:

they’re so tiny. so light. so weird-looking with their giant eyes

Between this & the fact that they act pretty goofy – since most of their brain capacity is dedicated to sorting through the large amounts of sensory information provided by those anime eyes & sharp ears – I would argue that owls are most definitely ridiculous birds

3

Notes from my sketchbooks

I like re-drawing anatomy sketches in each new notebook, partly to test myself and mostly so that when I draw that animal or bird or plant next, I will (I hope) remember to look for that part when I’m drawing.  I don’t worry about the drawing being good, especially since I’m sometimes straight-up copying somebody else’s diagram.  I worry about things being labeled properly.

However, if you get into doing this yourself, don’t get slavish about the anatomy that SHOULD be there once you start field-sketching an animal. One crucial thing to remember when you’re doing field sketching from life is: if you don’t see it, don’t draw it. A fast way to make your drawing look amateurish is to wedge in something just because you THINK it should be there.  Even the highlights in an eye- if you don’t see them, don’t put them in!