bio writing guide

important fictionkin thing

(but if you feel this relates to some other type of kin experience thats cool too!!)

its ok if youre not exactly the way you were before
its ok if you like different things now
its ok if you seem like you should be someone else when you know youre not
its ok if you dont have the powers or the face or the interests and habits you used to
they dont make you any less you!!
this is a new life and a new world and a new timeline and even though things are different and scary and some of our old friends are miles and miles away or we might not know where they are its going to be ok!!! youre still you and youre also the you youve become in this life and you can be whatever you you want to be or feel that you are and its great!!
we have to be strong for our friends both old and new! the world is big and vast and full of possibilities so we should try our best to stay positive for ourselves and for everyone else even when its hard just to wake up and convince yourself to live sometimes in the morning
its ok!!
youre doing great!!!

WRITING MASTERPOST

Words and References:

  • Massive Dictionary for Writers
  • Writing a Series
  • Visual Dictionary
  • Grammar Definitions
  • Glossary of Book Terms (2)
  • Literary Terms
  • Some Words About Word Count
  • English Grammar (with Russian translation)
  • Pronunciations of Words from All Languages
  • Punctuation Guide
  • Plot Terms and Definitions

Plot & Structure:

  • Plot Development
  • Developing Events in Your Story
  • The Hero’s Journey
  • Four Essential Plot Points
  • Basic Plots in Literature
  • Ten Simple Keys to Plot Structure
  • Plot vs Exposition
  • Plot Checklist
  • Exposition in Fiction
  • Balancing Exposition
  • Easing Exposition
  • Setting or Exposition
  • 3 Rules for Writing Endings
  • Writing Powerful Endings
  • Successful Endings
  • Writing a Story Middle
  • Beginnings, Middles, and Ends (2)
  • Three Parts to Every Story

Subplots:

  • Subplots
  • 7 Ways to Add Great Subplots to your Novels
  • The 7 Shoulds of Writing a Subplot
  • Who Needs Subplots?
  • Subplots
  • Knowing Your terms: Subplots
  • Weave Subplots into your Novel
  • Understanding the Role of Subplots
  • Plot, Plot Layers, and Subplots
  • Plot and Subplot
  • Subplots - Chicken Soup for your Novel
  • How Many Subplots are Acceptable?
  • Subplots by Word Count
  • Too Many Subplots?

World Building:

  • World Building Links
  • World Building Questionnaire (2)
  • Planet Maker
  • World Building 101
  • World Building for Science Fiction
  • Fantasy and Science Fiction Worlds
  • The Seed of Government (2)
  • The Magic of World Building

Characters:

  • Story Guide Worksheet
  • How to Create Great Characters
  • Character Arc 101
  • “Hero” is a Four Letter Word
  • Character Questionnaire (2) (3) (4) (5)
  • Character Justification
  • Conflict Can Limit Your Characters
  • Creating Characters from Plot
  • Character Bio
  • Guide to Writing a Villain
  • Eight Female Archetypes
  • Sixteen Personality Types
  • Charahub
  • Fixing Unlikable Characters
  • Offensive Mistakes Well-Intended Writers Makes (2)
  • Character Sheet
  • Morality Alignment
  • Morality Alignment Test (2) (3)
  • Creating Compelling Characters
  • Consistency is Key 
  • Desires and Conflict
  • Mary Sue Test
  • Mary Sue Villain Test
  • Writing Lycanthropy
  • Body Language (2) (3) 

Dialogue:

  • Character Conversations
  • How to Write Dialogue (2) (3) (4)
  • Speaking of Dialogue
  • Ten Tips
  • Character Dialogue
  • Believable Dialogue
  • 25 Things You Should Know About Dialogue
  • Witty Dialogue Reference Post
  • Dialogue Tips
  • Writing Really Good Dialogue
  • Writing Good Dialogue
  • Dialogue

Point of View:

  • Types of POV
  • Point of View
  • Third Person Multiple POV
  • First Person vs. Third
  • Third Person Omniscient vs. Limited
  • Using Third Person Omniscient
  • Writing Exposition in the First Person
  • Writing in First Person
  • First Person POV (2)
  • First Person or Third?
  • How to Write Winning First Person Stories

Genre:

  • Twenty Rules for Writing Detective Stories
  • Crime Fiction Sub Genres
  • So You Want to Write Crime Fiction
  • How to Write Crime Fiction
  • Smut Writing Guide Master List
  • Adding Sexual Tension
  • How to Write Sexual Tension
  • Literary Genres
  • Genre Index
  • 13 Horror Writing Tips
  • Classic Horror Novel Structure
  • 10 Laws of Good Science Fiction
  • Writing Science Fiction and Fantasy

Names:

  • Irish Names (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8)
  • Irish Surnames (2) (3) (4)
  • Scottish Names (2) (3) (4) (5) (6)
  • Scottish Surnames (2) (3) (4) (5) (6)
  • Welsh Names (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7)
  • Welsh Surnames (2) (3)
  • English Names (2) (3) (4) (5) (6)
  • English Surnames (2) (3) (4) (5)
  • Brittany Names (2)
  • Gaelic Names (2)
  • Cornish Names (2) (3) (4)
  • Cornish Surnames
  • Celtic Female Names (2) (3)
  • Celtic Male Names (2) (3)
  • Bible Names (2)
  • Find Names by Sound
  • Medieval Asian Names
  • Medieval Islamic Names
  • Medieval Names & Titles
  • Middle Eastern Names
  • North American Indian Names (2) 
  • French Names (2) (3) (4) (5) (6)
  • French Surnames (2) (3) (4)
  • German Names (2) (3) (4) (5)
  • German Surnames (2) (3) (4) (5)
  • Western African Names (2) (3)
  • Northern African Names (2) (3) (4) (5)
  • Latin American Names (2)
  • Traditional Hispanic Last Names
  • Chinese Names (2) (3) (4) (5)
  • Asian and Pacific Names (2)
  • African and Middle East Names
  • Italian Names (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7)
  • Italian Surnames (2) (3) (4)
  • Name Generator (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (Fantasy (2) (3) (4)) (Sci-fi (2))
  • Jewish Names (2) (3) (4) (5)
  • Jewish Surnames (2) (3) (4)
  • Russian Names (2) (3) (4)
  • Russian Surnames (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7)
  • Scandinavian Names (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7)
  • Scandinavian Surnames (2) (3)
  • Spanish Names (2)
  • Pagan Names
  • Nook of Names
  • What a Lovely Name
  • List of Names from Around the World
  • Etymology Dictionary
  • Name Playground
  • What’s in a Name?
  • 7 Rules for Picking Names
  • How to Invent Names
  • Nickname Lists (2) (3)
  • Latin Place Names
  • Name Dictionary
  • First Names Reference Database
  • Slave Trade Names Database

History:

  • 1920’s Reference Post
  • 1920’s Setting
  • History of Childbirth
  • 1920’s Slang
  • Medieval Reference Post
  • Medieval Scotland
  • All About Scotland
  • World Myths, Creatures, and Folklore
  • Knighthood and Orders of Chivalry
  • National Heraldry
  • Titles in the Elizabethan Era
  • Titles Explained
  • Peerage Basics
  • National Museum of the American Indian
  • American Indian Tribes and Languages Master List
  • Historical Resources

Query Letters:

  • How to Write a Query Letter
  • The 10 Dos and Don’ts of Writing a Query Letter
  • Anatomy of a Query Letter: A Step-By-Step Guide
  • Successful Query Letters for Literary Agents
  • Query Letter FAQ
  • Master the Art of the Query
  • Writing a Solid Query Letter
  • Writing a Query Letter that Sells
  • Dos and Don’ts: How to Write the Perfect Query Letter
  • Query Letters
  • Rachelle’s Query Tips
  • How to Query a Literary Agent
  • Query Letters
  • A Pitch is a Pitch
  • Make the Perfect Pitch: The Novel Query
  • How to Write Great Queries
  • How to Write a Query Letter
  • How to Query an Agent
  • How to Write a Dynamic Query Letter
  • Writing a Good Query Letter
  • Sample Query Letter PDF
  • Sample Novel Query Letter
  • Ten Ways to Hook a Literary Agent
  • What Not to Put in Your Query Letter
  • What (Not) to Put in Your Query Letter
  • Query Letters - What, Why, How?
  • What (Not) to do Before Querying
  • What to Write in the Bio Section of your Query Letter
  • How to Write a Bio Paragraph in your Query Letter
  • The Last Paragraph of your Query Letter: the Author Bio
  • Writing the Hook for your Query
  • Query Letter Dos and Don’ts
  • Agent Reveals Pet Peeves
  • How to Write a Query Letter
  • Query Letter Mad Lib
  • How to Format a Query Letter
  • 15 Reasons Agents Pass Over Query Letters
  • The Right Way to Write a Query Letter PDF
  • Query Letters
  • Writing a Query Letter
  • The Query Letter
  • How to Write a Query Letter
  • How to Write a Kick-Ass Query Letter
  • How to Write a Great Query Letter PDF
  • Query Letter to Agents
  • Writing a Killer Query Letter
  • 15 Resources for a Better Query Letter
  • 25 Reasons Your Query Letter Sucks
  • Query Letters: My Personal Journey
  • How to Write a Query Letter
  • A Bit of Regurgitated Query Letter Advice
  • Query Letter Advice: Let Someone Else Write It
  • Writing a Query Letter Part One: The Hook
  • Part Two: The Setup
  • Part Three: The Conflict
  • Part Four: The Consequence
  • Part Five: Everything Else
  • The Importance of Voice
  • The Query Letter that Won Me an Agent
  • How Not to Write the Perfect Query Letter
  • FAQ The Query Letter
  • Query Letters

Editing and Revision:

  • Editing Checklist
  • List of Freelance Editors
  • Tighten Your Manuscript
  • Editing Recipe
  • 7 Editing Questions
  • How to Rewrite
  • Revising a Novel
  • Editing Tips
  • Self Editing
  • How to Edit a Novel

Software:

  • Tip of my Tongue
  • Liquid Story Binder
  • Q10
  • 25 Writing Softwares
  • Jarte**
  • AbiWord
  • Calligra
  • Celtx**
  • Open Office
  • Scrivener*
  • Final Draft*
  • Atlantis Nova
  • Zoho**
  • Lit Lift
  • Hiveword
  • Story Book**
  • Character Writer*
  • Write Room (mac only)
  • Dark Room
  • Q10
  • Liquid Story Binder*
  • Now Novel**
  • yWriter 5
  • Time Toast
  • Interactive Timeline
  • Timeline Maker*
  • Preceden
  • Tiki Toki**
  • Time Glider**
  • Timeline Maker
  • My Timeline
  • Timeline JS
  • X Timeline
  • Our Story**
  • Dipity
  • Timeline Software*
  • Timelines*
  • Meograph
  • Timeline Charts*
  • Family Echo
  • Genealogy
  • Legacy Family Tree Maker**
  • Family Tree Builder**
  • XY Family Tree
  • Bubbl
  • Cliche Finder
  • *Not free. May include free trial.
  • **Includes free and premium content.

Prompts:

  • Inspiration Finder
  • Seventh Sanctum
  • Writing Prompts Generator
  • Timeline Generator
  • Writing Prompts
  • Plinky
  • Random Story Prompts
  • Random Prompts
  • Prompt Generator (2)
  • Writing Prompts
  • 14 Prompts

Writing Websites:

  • Galley Cat
  • Writer’s Digest
  • Absolute Write
  • Advanced Fiction Writing
  • Writer Beware
  • Chuck Sambuchino
  • Nathan Bransford
  • Novel Rocket
  • 101 Best Websites for Writers

OTHER

  • Inspiration 1
  • Instead of ‘whispered’
  • Writing fantasy
  • Emotions vocab sheet
  • How to reveal character
  • Writers block resource
  • Writing a death scene
  • BIO help
  • Writing prompt generators
  • How to torture a character
  • Degrees of emotion
  • Character names
  • Body language
  • Writing people of colour
  • character flaws

HOW TO WRITE A BIO
↳ By Lex

There is no right or wrong way, this is simply how I go about writing bios. I generally tend to write 3-4 paragraphs per bio, sometimes 5+, but for the sake of simplicity I’m going to keep this guide with the intention of writing a 3-4 paragraph bio. If you have any questions feel free to message rphelpdesk and I’d be happy to do my best! If you’ve found this useful, a like/reblog would be much appreciated.

Keep reading

Spending my snow day studying for midterms and writing my thesis paper.

I’ve been looking through the mess that is my binder of old notes to create an ultimate bio study guide.

My notes have come so far since the beginning of the term (and so has my ability to draw anatomy)

An Open Letter To Aspiring Fanfiction Writers

Recently I was tagged in this post and I felt like writing a little response to anyone who wants to start writing fanfiction:

Dear Aspiring Writers,

As big as the urge might be, as much as you think you’re not doing it right or writing what you want to be… Don’t delete as you write. Just write. Save the editing for later. Don’t reread what you’ve written until you’re done. Rewrite and edit as necessary later, but until you’re comfortable with your writing, don’t delete it. You have plenty of time to fine tune, for now, practice and keep writing and keep writing and don’t delete everything. Save some of it. It will help you grow.

“How does someone like me compare to someone like you.” By not comparing yourself. There is always going to be someone better than you, always. If you can’t find anyone better than you, look harder. Having someone better than you is a good way to strive to improve your skills. But comparing yourself to them isn’t the point. The point is to improve yourself to become a better you. Not to become someone else. Everyone’s styles are going to be different, everyone is going to have different strengths. Gain inspiration and allow yourself to be influenced, but don’t tell yourself that you’re not good enough simply because your writing isn’t like another person’s. And never let yourself think that you’re not good enough simply because your writing isn’t getting as many views as others. Because you are good enough. Good enough for you. And others will see that and you’ll be good enough for them too.

You will receive criticism, whether it is constructive or not, it’s usually always hard to take. Take constructive criticism, welcome it. It might sting to hear, it might not be what you wanted to hear, but take it. It doesn’t mean you have to change your story to fit what they’ve told you, it doesn’t mean you’ve done something wrong, but graciously taking criticism will help you grow. Now the kind of criticism that tells you “That’s shit. You’re a terrible writer. Please stop and for the love of god, do not continue” is not criticism. It’s bullshit. It hurts, it does. And there’s always a fear that someone is going to say that, that someone is going to take the time out of their miserable life to try and make yours just as miserable. Remember that they’re wrong. Remember that you don’t have to prove anything to them and that they are wasting both their time and yours by spreading useless hate. Keep writing. It will make you happy (and pissing them off would be a bonus)

Improving is not only writing, writing, writing, and editing, editing, editing. It’s also reading, Reading, READING. And I’m sure you’re doing plenty of it if you’re considering the option of writing fanfiction. If you’re having trouble with dialogue, read stage/screen plays and write dialogue only prompts. If you’re having trouble writing the proper characterization of a character, read character bios, watch or read the original fandom, take notes on their mannerisms. Whether you’re reading fanfiction, headcanons, character bios, episode summaries, writings guides, it’s all helping you improve. 

The courage to write and keep writing isn’t so much courage as it is a need. It doesn’t have to be a primary need like breathing and eating, but it’s something that you feel you need to do in order to keep going. Until you write that first word, and keep writing, that little headcanon will be there in your head, incomplete. You might find other fanfics like it, but it will never be exactly what you wanted it to look like. You’ll find yourself staring at a blank page/document frequently. It will become a familiar frenemy. But the need to write it yourself eventually outweighs your fear of filling that page. And the need for other people to read it, to know the story you’ve had inside, will outweigh the fear of posting it. Just breathe, post it, and step away from the computer for a while. Let it be out there, let it be free, then come back to it. Because there are people out there that want to read your story. Like all things in life, you can’t let fear keep you from doing what you want. Sometimes you have to kick fear in the balls and step over its curled up body. It’ll be worth it in the end.

Keep writing, keep reading, you’ll get there. Just don’t give up.