bill joyce

I enjoy two things set in the past, in the 1980s, Stranger Things and IT. I got thinking, “wait out old will they be now?” so here’s some heart breaking numbers you all!

David Harbour said that his character Hopper and Joyce were class of 1960, so that’d make then 18 years old in 1960. So they were born in 1942 the same year as the battle of Stalingrad, meaning in 2017 Joyce Byers and Jim Hopper

would be 75 years old. 

Steve Harrington is a year older than Nancy and in his Senior year, lets assume he’s 18 in 1984 so Steve was born in 1966 the year the Beatles released Revolver, meaning in 2017 Steve 

would be 51 years old.

Nancy Wheeler is a year younger than Steve and in her Junior year, I’m not sure but I believe that Jonathan Byers is the same age as Nancy meaning they were both born in 1967 the year of the Summer of Love, so in 2017 Nancy and Jonathan 

would be 50 years old

Now Will, Lucas, Dustin, Mike, Eleven and Max are all 13 years old in 1984 so were all born in 1971 the year Disney World opened, which means in 2017 

they would be 46 years old. 

Now, Richie, Eddie, Ben, Bev, Mike, Stan and Bill from IT the 2017 movie were 13 in 1989 meaning they were all born in 1976 the year Jimmy Carter was elected President, so in in 2017

They would be 41 years old. 

The Original characters from the book were 11 in 1958 meaning they were all born in 1947 so Ben, Richie, Bev, Mike, and Bill would all have turned 70 this year. 

the losers club go to the snow ball

i literally wrote this because @elisebazinga made the cutest gif edit of richie and eddie at a dance and now im crying over the thought of the losers going to the snow ball

- mike, richie, stan, lucas and bill all get ready together in mike’s basement and they’re all trying to tie each other’s ties and do their hair in one tiny mirror

- richie is freaking out because he can’t find the right blazer to wear and when stan asks why he just yells “BECAUSE EDDIE LIKES COLOUR COORDINATION, STANLEY”

- bill straightens stan’s bowtie for him just before they leave and they both kind of stare at each other in awe

- “you l-luh-look great, stan”

- “come on lover boys, we’re gonna be late!” lucas most likely

- loser mike and ben get ready together at dustin’s house and they help dustin style his hair just like steve instructed

- “you look great dude, max is gonna love it”

- ben wears a cute little maroon suit and mike is so proud of his best bud because he’s gonna ask bev to dance with him

- steve picks the three of them up and just grins at their outfits because they all look so good and he’s so proud of his sons

- at will’s house, bev, max, eleven and eddie are all getting ready and eddie is sitting with eleven helping her with her hair and she’s so nervous

- “you look amazing, el, trust me, mike’s gonna be blown away”

- “so will richie when he sees you” eddie blushes like a mad man

- beverly does max and eleven’s make up and both girls are so grossed out by the lipstick and blush but they let her work her magic anyway

- will is nervous about going to school with loads of people he doesn’t like but eddie promises to stay by his side the entire night

- joyce takes about a thousand photos of all of them because they all look so cute

- and she drives them all and waves them off with tears in her eyes because she’s so proud of them all

- the three groups take goofy photos together with jonothan laughing at them

- the losers and stranger kids all gather in a big group and are just staring at each other because damn, they clean up good

- richie stares at eddie as he walks across the room and it all goes slow motion and stan has to hit him to make him stop

- “eddie…you look amazing”

- “yeah, you too trashmouth”

- the second ‘time after time’ plays over the speakers everyone goes red because shit, this is a slow song, what do we do??

- when dustin can’t find anyone to dance beverly dances with him for a short while and ben is more than happy to let her because dustin is his best friend and deserves all the love

- he and mike dance together and everyone loves it

- will awkwardly accepts dancing with a girl but he keeps glancing at the boys like ‘help me’ 

- eddie encourages lucas to ask max to dance and nearly squeals when they do because he ships them so hard

- mike obvs asks eleven to dance, leaving eddie, richie, stan and bill alone

- “oh for fucks sake bill just ask him to dance already”

- bill awkwardly pulls stan to the dance floor but they eventually end up hugging and swaying to the beat and it’s so damn cute

- “so…what do you wanna do now, eds?”

- “i wanna dance”

- “o-oh, okay?”

- eddie grins and drags richie by the hand to the middle of the dance floor and he shows two left feet tozier how to slow dance

- richie is concentrating so hard not to step on eddie’s toes and eddie is just slowly falling in love with every second

- when max and lucas kiss eddie and bev just tearfully smile at each other

- when mike and eleven kiss richie cheers and high fives mike when eleven isn’t looking

- and when eddie pulls richie down by the collar to finally kiss him, mostly because he’s rambling and needs him to shut up, lucas and dustin cheer and everyone in their group wolf whistle

- “finally” stan would mutter with a grin as he and bill dance together

- “maybe i should t-tuh-take richie’s advice after all” bill says and stan blushes before kissing bill because fuck it

- at the end of the night jonothan gets them all to take one big group photo together in their outfits and he prints like 100 copies so everyone and their parents can have one

Just curious

Identify as ‘she’ comment 💕

Identify as 'he’ comment 👽

Identify as 'they’ comment 💙

Identify as anything I’ve missed comment 😱

I love how non-gender conforming the characters of Stranger Things are.

Guys are allowed to be emotional and vulnerable. They don’t automatically have to be good at fighting or shooting. They’re allowed to care and love their mamas and be the emotional support system of the group.They’re allowed to fall in love and pine and have their hearts broken. No, they’re not ‘too cool’ nor are they ‘too manly’ for that. They can be nurturers.

Girls are allowed to be assertive, tough-as-nails, relentless and ruthless. They’re allowed to make selfish decisions. They’re the badasses, the fighters, the tanks. They’re allowed to have a plot-focused/action-focused development more than a romantic one. They can be protectors. 

I just really love this show and Joyce, Hopper, Mike, Eleven, Will, Lucas, Dustin, Max, Nancy, Jonathan, Steve, Bob, and even Bill. 

Hey guys I’m stuck in an 80s obsession and I don’t think there’s any coming back

I’m watching Stranger Things for the 7th time and I’ve seen It three times (so far) and I just really love the 80s aesthetic and I’ve been obsessed with it for like a year now

(Note: This is the part 2 of the interview. To read part 1, click here.)

Stephen Anderson began his career at Disney as a storyboard artist on Tarzan. He then served as Head of Story on The Emperor’s New Groove and Brother Bear, before making the leap to director on Meet the Robinsons.

So how did Stephen first hook up with Disney, and how many Meet the Robinsons-related anecdotes can I squeeze from his brain? Let’s find out in the second part of our EXCLUSIVE three-part interview…


Part 2: Working at Disney


The Disney Elite: You started your career at Disney as a storyboard artist on Tarzan. How did that come about?


Stephen Anderson: I got to Disney through a colleague at Hyperion. I became friends with Kevin Lima, who came to Hyperion to direct a feature adaptation of Thumbalina. His co-director was Chris Buck, who had been my animation teacher at CalArts. I helped out on that film as much I could because I loved the idea and I loved working with those two. Eventually the project got shelved and those guys left. Kevin went to Disney and directed A Goofy Movie and after that, Disney wanted him to direct Tarzan. He chose Chris Buck as his co-director and so, because of those connections, I was able to become a part of their story team on Tarzan. We’ve all heard that cliche about how so much of success is who you know? This was a perfect example of that.





The Disney Elite: After working in Story on Tarzan, The Emperor’s New Groove and Brother Bear, you made the leap to director on Meet the Robinsons. Would you explain how you made that huge transition?


Stephen Anderson: First off, the only thing I wanted to do more than be an animator was to be a director. In fact, directing (and screenwriting/filmmaking in general) really took over the older I got. As a teenager, I started seeing more diverse kinds of movies, learning about filmmakers, reading about how movies are made, about screenplay structure, about what a director is, and I grew to love the idea of moviemaking. It was really the films of Steven Spielberg that changed my path and made me want to be a director. First off, the level of emotion and audience reaction that I saw and felt when I watched his films was something I wanted to be able to give to an audience someday. Loving his films then made me want to learn more about him so through reading articles and interviews and watching ‘making of’ specials, I decided that that’s what I wanted to do. So this was always the goal beyond the goal.


After Tarzan, I became interested in pursuing the Head of Story role and was fortunate to be asked to fill that role on Groove and on Brother Bear. I had asked, before Brother Bear, if I could be considered for a directing position in the future so we were already having that conversation. Since I’d been performing leadership roles, they were open to the idea. I helped develop a project for the studio on the side, during the last year of Brother Bear, with the thought that if it continued, I’d be the director. It did NOT continue. I finished Brother Bear, moved back to California (because we had to relocate to Orlando for that project), and was then handed a script for A Day with Wilbur Robinson





The Disney Elite:Meet the Robinsons was one of Disney’s early entries into CG animated features. While Pixar had already released such brilliant films as Toy Story, Toy Story 2 and The Incredibles, over at Disney there was just Dinosaur and Chicken Little. Was Meet the Robinsons always intended as a CG film, and were you at all nervous and/or hesitant about making it one?



Stephen Anderson: Boy, the memory is getting hazy but, as far as I can remember, MtR was always intended to be a CG feature. Yes, in fact I remember that while I was still on Brother Bear, the announcement was made that the studio was transitioning out of hand drawn. I was slightly anxious about doing CG just because it was something new I had to learn on top of already trying to learn how to be a good director. But to me, the creative stuff is always the biggest challenge and the thing that occupies my mind most of the time. Disney has the best people in the world so I’m always confident that the movie will look good, sound good, etc. And I was lucky to have such great artistic and technical leadership surrounding me. I trusted them to help me out if I was confused or uncertain about the technology. They all gave me a boot camp in computer animation at the beginning so I felt like I had a pretty good foundation starting out and I felt safe asking about anything I didn’t know.





The Disney Elite: Meet the Robinsons was the first of Disney’s CG films that made me think, “Now THIS is the perfect pairing of film and format!” The slick, shiny surfaces of the CG at that time really served to complement the futuristic, retro/moderne look of your film. Not only that, but while Pixar was aiming more and more for a photorealistic approach to their animation, your cartoon was, well, CARTOONY! And not just the backgrounds and characters, but also the animation itself. For a relatively early CG film, you got some gorgeously goofy character animation in there! If you wouldn’t mind, would you make a list of the films – animated or otherwise – that you used as inspiration for Meet the Robinsons?


Stephen Anderson: Well story-wise, we looked at the movie You Can’t Take It With You. It’s also about an eccentric family with quirky personalities and passions. Bill Joyce, the author/illustrator of the book that MtR is based on, told me that You Can’t Take It With You was a huge influence on him when he was creating the Robinson family. With our art director, Robh Ruppel, we talked a lot about The Wizard of Oz and how that movie goes from a sepia palette to a Technicolor palette and that influenced the look of the distant past (when we see Lewis’ mother giving him up it’s sepia) and the future (bright, bold and Technicolor). With the animators, we looked at scenes of Jim Carrey as inspiration for both Wilbur and Bowler Hat Guy. Also a lot of Looney Tunes. We used to say that Lewis is a Disney character and Wilbur and the Robinsons are Warner Looney Tunes characters. Lewis moves in more of a solid, natural, Disney-type of animation and the Robinsons are zippier and invade your personal space more like Looney Tunes characters. Those are some of the main influences I can think of.





The Disney Elite: Another wonderfully cartoony element of the film is your choice of voice-actors. The voice-work often reminds me more of 1960s Hanna-Barbera cartoons than anything Disney was doing at the time. I mean, there are some really unexpected picks in there (Batman’s Adam West, Roseanne’s Laurie Metcalf, There’s Something About Mary’s Harland Williams), all of whom do an AMAZING job. Oh, and then there’s YOU – voicing not one, not two, but THREE characters, including the mustache-twirling Bowler Hat Guy! Care to share the story behind that bit of kismet casting?


Stephen Anderson: Thank you for saying that about our voice actor choices. I’ve always been such a fan of those classic voice actors and I liked approaching our casting that way. We thought it best to not go with big names, but just solid character performers. To me, actors who have experience in theater, sketch comedy and improv are really best for animation because they know how to create strong and clear characters.


As far as my involvement goes, it’s pretty simple. I’m sure you know about the work-in-progress reels that we create, where we take our story boards and cut them to temp vocals, music and sound fx. Well, I did the temp voices for those characters and, after several screenings with my voice in there, folks just got used to it and eventually I became the voice of those characters. It was the same with other members of the team. Frankie the Frog, Uncle Gaston and Lewis’ coach, Lefty the butler, the t-rex that BHG unleashes - those were all voiced by members of the story crew.





The Disney Elite: Meet the Robinsons is one of those rare movies that makes me tear up every time I watch it. This is all the more rare seeing as how for most of the film, it’s funny, funny, FUNNY. It seems to me like this kind of emotional punch can only be created when a writer/director is willing to put their own emotions and experiences into their work. Was this true for you? And if so, would you mind sharing a bit of your personal story that effected the story being told in Meet the Robinsons?


Stephen Anderson: The adoption part of the story was not in Bill Joyce’s original book. That was something that two development executives and a writer had built in to the first draft of the script, long before I’d come on to the project. When the studio handed me that script, I couldn’t believe what I was reading. While my story differs from Lewis’, I still totally identified with his quest to know who his mother is and to find out why she gave him up. And the studio had no idea that I was adopted so it was a complete coincidence. Because I understood Lewis so well, I was able to bring out that emotional side much more. It was there in the original draft, but I felt we could strengthen it.


The theme of 'Keep Moving Forward’ evolved out of early discussions about adoption and my personal feelings about it. My parents were very open with me about it and told me I was adopted at a very early age. They used to tell me that when I became 18, I could access my records and find out who my birth parents were and that they would support me in that. So for many years, I looked towards that age as a big milestone and I was determined to find out where I came from. Then one day, I realized my 18th birthday had come and gone and I’d totally forgotten about starting this search. I’d gotten distracted by life, CalArts, starting a career, getting married, etc. And I was so lucky to have been adopted by such a loving family. What would finding my birth parents change? Nothing really. In fact, I’ve heard stories about people having very negative experiences reconnecting with birth parents and that sometimes it makes things worse for them. So the important thing was to not focus on the past but on the positive present and the promising future. And that helped us all realize that that’s exactly what Lewis is going through too.


The Disney Elite. Wow. I’m damned near speechless. That right there made my day, my week, my YEAR. That was incredibly moving and inspiring, Stephen. Thanks so much for sharing that.





Thursday: In Part 3 of our interview, Stephen Anderson tells us about his life at Disney post-Meet the Robinsons. There’s his work as director on Winnie the Pooh, his place in Disney’s famed ‘Story Trust’…oh, and his upcoming, TOP SECRET animated feature film project! He’ll also offer some GREAT advice for folks hoping to make art their life. If this sounds like YOU, make sure to come back and check it out. I hope you’ll join us!


All art via Stephen Anderson’s Instagram

NOTE: This interview would not have been possible without the kindness and assistance of tumblr user Morgan – a.k.a. that-guy-in-the-bowler-hat. Morgan runs the internet’s PREMIER Meet the Robinsons archive and fansite. If you are a fan of MtR, you MUST check out his tumblr a.s.a.p.!

Meeting William Joyce

Hi Friends!  I know I had promised to take lots of pictures of the event I attended this weekend to see William Joyce, but unfortunately cell phones were not allowed to be used!  It has something to do with the microphones they used at the event, and how the phones interfered with the sound.

Never the less, here are some pictures I did manage to take, as well as the gift I made for Bill Joyce and a video of he and I for a little bit.  The other videos are what I could remember of all the things he said, and ways to connect with him that I feel like are the best ways to really get a grasp of who he is and what he’s about.

So I made him two of the characters from “Ollie’s Odyssey,” as a thank you…


And here’s what else I could remember (sorry the video cuts off!)

And information about getting in touch with him!

Tell William Joyce

“21st - HOW DID ROTG AFFECT YOU?
How has this movie affected you and your life? Why do you like it?
If you could–how would you tell William Joyce how much you enjoyed the movie?”


^—- That was one of the prompts for ROTG Anniversary week and I just want to remind everyone that you absolutely can tell William Joyce how much you enjoy the movie.  He’s on instagram ‘heybilljoyce’ and I PROMISE YOU he loves to get comments from fans.  He often replies and sometimes even reads them to his wife to make her smile.  Please make his day and let him know if his work means something to you.  I get the sense he’s never really had feedback like this before and it’s really exciting for him.

Okay I’m pretty sure that the book It, by Stephen King, is going to play a huge role in Stranger Things season 2. Spider monster??? 1984??? Coincidence? I THINK NOT.

Cross out what you’ve already read. Six is the average.

Pride and Prejudice - Jane Austen
Lord of the Rings - JRR Tolkien
Jane Eyre - Charlotte Bronte
Harry Potter series - JK Rowling
To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee
The Bible - Council of Nicea
Wuthering Heights - Emily Bronte
Nineteen Eighty Four - George Orwell
His Dark Materials - Philip Pullman
Great Expectations - Charles Dickens
Little Women - Louisa M Alcott
Tess of the D’Urbervilles - Thomas Hardy
Catch 22 - Joseph Heller
Rebecca - Daphne Du Maurier
The Hobbit - JRR Tolkien
Birdsong - Sebastian Faulk
Catcher in the Rye - JD Salinger
The Time Traveller’s Wife - Audrey Niffenegger
Middlemarch - George Eliot
Gone With The Wind - Margaret Mitchell
The Great Gatsby - F Scott Fitzgerald
Bleak House - Charles Dickens
War and Peace - Leo Tolstoy
The Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams
Brideshead Revisited - Evelyn Waugh
Crime and Punishment - Fyodor Dostoyevsky
Grapes of Wrath - John Steinbeck
Alice in Wonderland - Lewis Carroll
The Wind in the Willows - Kenneth Grahame
Anna Karenina - Leo Tolstoy
David Copperfield - Charles Dickens
Chronicles of Narnia - CS Lewis
Emma - Jane Austen
Persuasion - Jane Austen
The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe - CS Lewis
The Kite Runner - Khaled Hosseini
Captain Corelli’s Mandolin - Louis De Bernieres
Memoirs of a Geisha - Arthur Golden
Winnie the Pooh - AA Milne
Animal Farm - George Orwell
The Da Vinci Code - Dan Brown
One Hundred Years of Solitude - Gabriel Garcia Marquez
A Prayer for Owen Meaney - John Irving
The Woman in White - Wilkie Collins
Anne of Green Gables - LM Montgomery
Far From The Madding Crowd - Thomas Hardy
The Handmaid’s Tale - Margaret Atwood
Lord of the Flies - William Golding
Atonement - Ian McEwan
Life of Pi - Yann Martel
Dune - Frank Herbert
Cold Comfort Farm - Stella Gibbons
Sense and Sensibility - Jane Austen
A Suitable Boy - Vikram Seth
The Shadow of the Wind - Carlos Ruiz Zafon
A Tale Of Two Cities - Charles Dickens
Brave New World - Aldous Huxley
The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time - Mark Haddon
Love In The Time Of Cholera - Gabriel Garcia Marquez
Of Mice and Men - John Steinbeck
Lolita - Vladimir Nabokov
The Secret History - Donna Tartt
The Lovely Bones - Alice Sebold
Count of Monte Cristo - Alexandre Dumas
On The Road - Jack Kerouac
Jude the Obscure - Thomas Hardy
Bridget Jones’s Diary - Helen Fielding
Midnight’s Children - Salman Rushdie
Moby Dick - Herman Melville
Oliver Twist - Charles Dickens
Dracula - Bram Stoker
The Secret Garden - Frances Hodgson Burnett
Notes From A Small Island - Bill Bryson
Ulysses - James Joyce
The Bell Jar - Sylvia Plath
Swallows and Amazons - Arthur Ransome
Germinal - Emile Zola
Vanity Fair - William Makepeace Thackeray
Possession - AS Byatt
A Christmas Carol - Charles Dickens
Cloud Atlas - David Mitchell
The Color Purple - Alice Walker
The Remains of the Day - Kazuo Ishiguro
Madame Bovary - Gustave Flaubert
A Fine Balance - Rohinton Mistry
Charlotte’s Web - EB White
The Five People You Meet In Heaven - Mitch Albom
Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
The Faraway Tree Collection - Enid Blyton
Heart of Darkness - Joseph Conrad
The Little Prince - Antoine De Saint-Exupery
The Wasp Factory - Iain Banks
Watership Down - Richard Adams
A Confederacy of Dunces - John Kennedy Toole
A Town Like Alice - Nevil Shute
The Three Musketeers - Alexandre Dumas
Hamlet - William Shakespeare
Charlie and the Chocolate Factory - Roald Dahl
Frankenstein - Mary Shelley
The Canterbury Tales - Geoffrey Chaucer
Paradise Lost - John Milton
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - Mark Twain
White Fang - Jack London
The Portrait of Dorian Gray - Oscar Wilde
Queen of the Damned - Anne Rice
Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde - Robert Louis Stevenson
The Call of the Wild - Jack London
The Importance of Being Earnest - Oscar Wilde

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz — L. Frank Baum
Don Quixote — Miguel De Cervantes
Where the Wild Things Are — Maurice Sendak
The Cat in the Hat — Dr Seuss
The Giver — Lois Lowry
Inkheart — Cornelia Funke
Divine Comedy — Dante Alighieri
Macbeth — William Shakespeare
Romeo and Juliet — William Shakespeare
The Child Called ‘It’ — Dave Pelzer
The Hunger Games — Suzanne Collins
The Diary of a Young Girl — Anne Frank
Night — Elie Wiesel
Les Misérables — Victor Hugo
The Odyssey — Homer
The Scarlet Letter — Nathaniel Hawthorne
The Brothers Karamasov — Fyodor Dostoyevsky
Eragon — Christopher Paolini

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Batman & Bill (2017)

Everyone thinks that Bob Kane created Batman, but that’s not the whole truth. One author makes it his crusade to seek justice for Bill Finger, a struggling writer who was the key figure in creating the iconic superhero, from concept to costume to the very character we all know and love. Bruce Wayne may be Batman’s secret identity, but his creator was always a true mystery.

Directed by:   Don Argott & Sheena M. Joyce

Starring:   Athena Finger, Roy Thomas, Michael Uslan, Thomas Andrae, Marc Tyler Nobleman, Alethia Mariotta, Kevin Smith

Release date:   May 6, 2017