bike and hike

Eight reasons to visit Colorado

Colorado is the home of the Rocky Mountains, the gateway to the West, filled with pioneer history, real life cowboys, hip towns, hot springs and some of the best hiking, biking, camping and climbing you’re ever likely to find – all only one direct flight away, with British Airways flying to Denver seven times per week.

Winter here is rightly famous, but the adventure lasts all year. In summer, wildflowers carpet the mountain slopes; in autumn, golden hues race through the forests. There are 300 days of sunshine a year, more 14ers (mountain summits over 14,000-feet) than any other state and a festival scene that doesn’t quit - from the spectacular Snowmass Hot Air Balloon Festival where hundreds of balloons fill the sky with colour, to the slightly mad Iron Horse Bicycle Classic (fancy chasing a steam train up a mountain anyone?), Colorado’s got you covered.


Powder dreams

Photo by Dolly1224 on Pixabay

European ski resorts might get all the airtime, but for true winter junkies a Rocky Mountain trip is a must. Powder here is drier, lighter and perfect for carving, plus the runs are empty and enormous. The amount of choice is superb too, from the wide-open bowls of Vail and Breckenridge to the fast lines of Aspen and Snowmass, as well as more than a dozen other world-class winter resorts within a short drive of each other.


Elevated adventure

Photo by Unknown on Pixabay

Colorado is home to 12 national parks and monuments, offering everything from backpacking and horseback riding to rafting, rock climbing and even, in Great Sand Dunes National Park, sand boarding among North America’s highest dunes. Most ski resorts stay open year-round, switching from pistes to downhill mountain biking trails and keeping the lifts running for high-elevation hiking and easy-to-reach panoramic views. The town of Grand Junction makes an excellent adventure base-camp, with some of the best outdoor activities in the state right in its back yard.


Some like it hot

Photo by on kahern Pixabay

Combining the spectacular scenery of the Rockies with five of the hippest hot spring towns in the country, the 720-mile Historic Hot Springs Loop is the best way to soak up Colorado’s healing waters. With 30 natural thermal pools open year-round, highlights include the largest mineral hot springs pool in the world at Glenwood Springs, the soothing natural vapour caves of Ouray and the bubbling delights of Steamboat.


National Parks

Photo by Niagara66 on Wiki Commons 

Rocky Mountain National Park is legendary: a 415-square-mile wilderness of jagged peaks and high alpine lakes home to coyote, black bear and moose. The fun mountain town of Estes Park, a great base from which to explore it, is just 1.5 hours from Denver. There are lesser known national parks too such as Black Canyon of the Gunnison, a spectacular 2,000-foot gorge that rivals the Grand Canyon but draws a fraction of the crowds, and the cliff-dwellings of Mesa Verde, one of the best preserved examples of Native American culture in the country.


Red Rocks Amphitheatre

Photo by VISIT DENVER

If you’re after something a little less strenuous, try Red Rocks Park and Amphitheatre – by day it’s a free city park just 30 minutes west of Denver with hiking trials and giant rock formations, by night, an outdoor music venue that has hosted everyone from The Beatles to local jazz, rock and bluegrass artists.


The Wild West

Photo by VISIT DENVER

From ghost towns and vintage trains to working cowboy ranches and the largest rodeo in the world, Denver’s annual National Western Stock Show and Rodeo (as well as the first: the Deer Trail Rodeo which started in 1869) – the Wild West is alive and kicking in Colorado. 

Saddle up or join a cattle drive, and you’ll feel the spirit of that old frontier still; footprints of dinosaurs embedded in stone, petroglyphs carved into cliffs, rivers where you can pan for gold. 

Want to look the part? Head to Rockmount Ranch Wear in downtown Denver, where Western icon, Jack A. Weil, invented the first cowboy shirt with poppers instead of buttons and popularised Western wear into popular culture.


Hop Heaven 

Photo by VISIT DENVER

With more craft breweries per capita than any other state, Colorado is heaven for hop heads. Denver’s Great American Beer Festival is the largest craft beer event in the country while the Telluride Blues & Brews Festival is set in a spectacular valley. But, it’s the little-known gems that really catch the eye: The Grimm Brothers, serving fable-inspired brews in Loveland, and the mountain views from Avery’s enormous outdoor patio in Boulder, are two local favourites. 

Get the true lowdown on a self-guided tour along the Denver Beer Trail and sample everything from stouts to lagers.


Sports Mad

Photo by colour line on Wiki Commons 

Denver is Bronco’s country. When Colorado’s American Football team plays, the whole city dresses in orange to support. Catch games live at the Blake Street Tavern in the heart of downtown. But with seven premier sports teams in all, don’t stop there. On a warm summer night, hot dog in one hand, cold beer in the other, there’s no better place to be than Coors Field, home of The Rockies baseball team.


On the Rails

Photo by Carol M. Highsmith on Wiki Commons 

The steam-powered Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Railway, built in 1882, cuts spectacularly through the canyons and remote mountains of the San Juan National Forest – a journey taken by Colorado’s first pioneers more than a century ago.  While vintage train lovers will adore Pikes Peak Cog Railway, near Colorado Springs. The highest cog railway on the planet, it climbs to the 14,114-foot summit of Pike’s Peak, the view from here inspired the song America the Beautiful

Plan your Colorado holiday with British Airways


Words by Aaron Millar

Header Photo by VISIT DENVER

flickr

(via Sunset, Steep Slope / 岡本三丁目の坂 | この坂、自転車で登るよりも、下る方が怖い | ゆうくん a.k.a. “U"suke | Flickr)

Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area on the New Jersey-Pennsylvania border is a wonderland of forested mountains, tumbling waterfalls, Native American and Colonial historic sites, bountiful wildlife and dynamic rivers and streams. Recreation opportunities include boating, biking, fishing, hunting, hiking and enjoying the views along scenic roadways. An easy drive from New York City and Philadelphia, the park is a popular year round getaway. Here, it’s showing a spectrum of lovely fall colors. Photo by National Park Service.

anonymous asked:

This is going to sound like a stupid question, but it seems like most of your campsites are literally just in the middle of no where, not like at a legit camping ground. Is that necessarily legal? Asking because I'm real inspired to try something like this myself

This is not a dumb question at all - and perfectly relevant to our current fight to protect our public lands.  I can legally camp in the middle of nowhere because I do so on public lands - lands owned by all American Citizens.  This is land set aside for public use - be it camping, hunting, fishing, biking, climbing, hiking, etc…  Public Lands are owned and supported by tax payers and also sometimes referred to as Federal Land (most research shows public land costs about $4 dollars per tax payer a year).  Restrictions depend on the agency that manages the area - most BLM (Bureau of Land Management) land has very few restrictions and allows for camping almost anywhere (without the need for a campground).  However, I strongly encourage Leave No Trace ethics when camping in wilderness and if you are going to camp on our public lands please go to the following link and read the 7 Leave No Trace Principles:

 https://lnt.org/learn/7-principles 

I prefer to camp in the wild - to leave the city behind and experience the outdoors as a refuge from human impact - and in order to continue to experience it as such we need to keep it looking as if we were never there.  I am a climber, a hunter, a mountaineer, a fisher, a hiker, a biker, and most importantly I was lucky enough to be born in the USA which gives me access to public wilderness as if I had the money to own a cabin in the mountains.  However, I don’t have the money to own a cabin and so when the weekend rolls around I throw a few things in the back of the Land Cruiser and head for public lands… I find a spot that is my own, that feels as if I am one of the few lucky enough to sit on this rock and watch the sun go down - and I am lucky.  

Watch the video link below:  4 minute bipartisan history of how the USA came to have so much public federal land, specifically in the west.  This video educated me on how almost all federal land has always been federal land - and is not land that was taken from the states:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rC_mnRu-4gA

It is my opinion that there is falsehood in state legislator’s desire to want public lands to be taken from the federal government and given to the state for the resident’s interests and stats seem to support this.  Federal land is held in a trust for the use of the American people -  and that’s it, that’s all, it is there for our future generations - so that I can teach my kid to ethically hunt and camp in the mountains just as my grandfather and father taught me.  Some states do a great job with land they manage for public access, but the problem is that the land is no longer explicitly a trust and if the wrong individuals become elected, or are already are elected, that land can now be sold to private entities and will no longer be accessible to the public. In FACT 156 MILLION acres of Federal Public Land has been transferred to states and of that land 70% has been sold to private entities - that is 110 MILLION acres that we don’t have shared access to use anymore.  I would rather not risk the possibility of my land being sold off so that I can not use it.  Historically this has occurred when a state’s budget isn’t balanced because it is pretty easy to sell of a chunk of land to compensate for debt. 

Please read the Field and Stream article in the Link below it is easy and incredibly informative:

http://www.fieldandstream.com/keep-public-lands-in-public-hands#page-3

Please vote to protect our public lands! 

Public lands for our use and what agency manages them can be seen in the map below: 


flickr

(via Three Peaks Cyclocross 2010 | Simon Fell - Ingleborough - No… | Flickr

Welcome Home

Steve Rogers Extended Imagine

NSFW - Feedback/comments are welcome and encouraged; I’m still trying to get better at this! Enjoy!

You pushed the key into the door, stepping through to hold it open for Steve, who was carrying all three bags of luggage. Even after many days of traveling, his strength never faltered.

“Home sweet home,” he said, dropping the bags at the foot of the stairs.

Keep reading

vimeo

A 12 minute, award winning video of a trip through New Zealand’s South Island. Original video caption:

3 adventurers, a film-maker and a photographer set off on a 6 day, 300km unsupported journey. By combining new bike-packing and pack-rafting technology, they link together white-water rivers and backcountry tracks through some of NZ’s underappreciated wilderness areas. To add to the drama, only months before a massive earthquake changes their plans and reveals opportunities to explore new landscapes.
The Waiau-toa Odyssey was awarded the Hiddleston/MacQueen Award for the Best NZ Made Film for the 2017 New Zealand Mountain Film Festival!

Just outside of Washington, D.C., in Virginia, Great Falls Park is the perfect place to get some exercise. There’s hiking, biking, fishing, climbing and boating opportunities. But, however fast you’re moving, the stunning view of the Potomac River crashing over the falls will stop you in your tracks. Photo courtesy of Jose Torres.

oH MY GOD YA’LL my mom was looking to buy a backpack for when we go biking/ hiking and this is what she thought she was ordering and what she actually got i’m LAUGHIGN SO HARD SHE BRAGGED ABOUT HOW MUCH OF A DEAL IT WAS

it fits percy perfectly tho

Break a Plateau

A plateau is a phase during weight-loss when you seem to maintain your weight even if your caloric intake hasn’t changed. Your body is probably resisting weight loss because it’s being pushed too far. Your metabolism could be slowing down because you’re not eating enough, and variety is important to your body. You can affect your metabolism through eating habits:

• Eat more negative calorie foods like fruits and vegetables // They’ll keep your digestive system moving with fewer calories.

• Drink lots of water // as you already should be doing, this way your body will be well hydrated, and you will less likely become lethargic.

• Changing your caloric intake does not always mean decreasing! // If your metabolism has slowed down, it may need some more calories to speed up a bit. Don’t overdo this, just try to increase by 10%, and when you passed the plateau, you decrease 10%.

• Exercising: your body will get the best out of a workout when it’s being challenged. So the first time you run a mile you may feel exhausted, your muscles might be sore and all of that…but if you keep running one mile each day for a week or two, your body will build more muscle, use those same muscles over and over while neglecting others, and others won’t be as challenged. You should change either the length of time or intensity of your workout.

• If you’ve been exercising every day, try doing 20 minutes one day and then 40 minutes the next day, so you’re getting a variety, try switching to different types of exercise every other day, for example, run on monday, swim on tuesday, weight lift on wednesday, run on thursday, yoga on friday, swim on saturday, bike/hike on sunday. 

Effects won’t occur immediately. Patience and slower weight loss is good

3

Happiness

Got married last weekend in the mountains with a few close friends.

We spent 10 days camping in the van - hiking, biking, fishing and watching sunsets through campfire smoke.  Our daily jump in the cold water of a snowmelt lake was our only shower.  At week’s end - sun burnt, bruised from crashing mountain bikes, scratched from trail running through overgrown trails, and with our fair share of bug bites - we stood atop a rock on the edge of the forest with the sun setting over jagged peaks in the distance and the crackle of a large campfire cooking tinfoil dinners for 30 of our friends and family and we were married.  There was no agenda - we camped, played and laughed with friends and when the moment was right we took 5 minutes and were married at sunset.  It was simple and perfect.