big dippers

sketchymel  asked:

You must be the North Star, because the light around you guided me here.

The North Star is located in the Big Dipper, which the Big Dipper is part of the constellation called Ursa Major

Sorry again, astronomy geek lol

@buryooooo

AHHHHH MORE FANFICS OH MY LORD

EXPECT ZERO!BILLxFIGHT!DIPPER IN THE FUTURE I PLAN ON MAKING FLUFF
AHHH SO MUCH FANFICS SO LITTLE TIME
BUT FOR NOW, HERES THE BROTHERS AU THING
TOOK ME FOREVER TO THINK OF SOMETHING OH MY LORD I HAVE NO IDEA WHERE THIS IS GOING AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH

Disclaimer: Nothing here belongs to me, and belongs to the person who created it. The only thing I own is the plot.

Also, sorry it’s short;;;; I’m writing this while I’m sick and tired and I feel like I’m dying, so I’m just gonna try and get this over with so I can take a nap or just sleep in general =^=

Also, really really sorry. It ended up shorter than I expected. Gosh I’m tired. Anyways, Imm gonna call it done, I don’t know what else to add to it. I’ll probably write something longer in the future

Classic:
Dipper - Majors in creative writing - 17
Mabel - Majors in mixed media art - 17

Reverse:
Mason - Majors in psychology - 21
Belle - Majors in fashion designer - 21

Fight:
Tyrone - Majors in sport science - 19
May - Majors in human physiology - 19

(None of the Mabel’s are in it)

Keep reading

8

Images of Hubble Ultra Deep Field (the farthest we’ve ever seen into the universe) and it’s close-ups.

Astronomers, in 1996, attempted something extraordinary. They pointed the Hubble Space Telescope into a part of the sky that seemed utterly empty, a patch devoid of any planets, stars and galaxies. This area was close to the Big Dipper, a very familiar constellation. The patch of sky was no bigger than a grain of sand held out at arms length. There was a real risk that the images returned would be as black as the space at which it was being pointed. Nevertheless, they opened the telescope and slowly, over the course of 10 full days, photons that had been travelling for over 13 billion years finally ended their journey on the detector of humanity’s most powerful telescope. When the telescope was finally closed, the light from over 3,000 galaxies had covered the detector, producing one of the most profound and humbling images in all of human history - every single spot, smear, and dot was an entire galaxy, each one containing hundreds of billions of stars. 

Later, in 2004, they did it again, this time pointing the telescope toward an area near the constellation Orion. They opened the shutter for over 11 days and 400 complete orbits around the Earth. Detectors with increased sensitivity and filters that allowed more light through than ever before allowed over 10,000 galaxies to appear in what became known as the Ultra Deep Field, an image that represented the farthest we’ve ever seen into the universe.The photons from these galaxies left when the universe was only 500 million years old, and 13 billion years later, they end their long journey as a small blip on a telescope’s CCD. 

There are over 100 billion galaxies in the universe. Simply saying that number doesn’t really mean much to us because it doesn’t provide any context. Our brains have no way to accurately put that in any meaningful perspective. When we look at this image, however, and think about the context of how it was made, and really understand what it means, we instantly gain the perspective and cannot help but be forever changed by it. We pointed the most powerful telescope ever built by human beings at absolutely nothing, for no other reason than because we were curious, and discovered that we occupy a very tiny place in the heavens.

In the winter of 1995, scientists pointed the Hubble Telescope at an area of the sky near the Big Dipper, a spot that was dark and out of the way of light pollution from surrounding stars. The location was apparently empty, and the whole endeavor was risky. What, if anything, was going to show up? Over ten consecutive days, the telescope took close to 150 hours of exposure of that same area. And what came back was nothing short of spectacular: an image of over 1,500 distinct galaxies glimmering in a tiny sliver of the universe. 

Now, let’s take a step back to understand the scale of this image. If you were to take a ballpoint pen and hold it at arm’s length in front of the night sky, focusing on its very tip, that is what the Hubble Telescope captured in its first Deep Field image. In other words, those 3,000 galaxies were seen in just a tiny speck of the universe, approximately one two-millionth of the night sky.

So the next time you stand gazing up at the night sky, take a moment to think about the enormity of what is beyond your vision, out in the dark spaces between the stars.

From the TED-Ed Lesson How small are we in the scale of the universe? - Alex Hofeldt

Animation by Yukai Du

7

What do you mean it’s not January/Stanuary anymore??

If you’ve ever seen Cheaper by the Dozen you’ll understand where this came from haha

As a last goodbye the Twins decided to show their appreciation for Stan. Ford, Soos and Wendy overheard their plans and decided to join :)