betzine

Whishaw Richard II vocal analysis example
  • Whishaw Richard II vocal analysis example
  • Ben Whishaw
  • Richard II
Play

You know what’s nice? When the actor you crush on really does have serious technical chops to talk about. Tomorrow’s Shakespeare on Film class is about actor’s tools, the languages of gesture and expression and such, and I’m using three examples of vocal technique. We’ll talk about how an actor’s voice sounds and what it feels like, but also how it means. How does the way an actor uses his voice affect the meaning of what he says? Here, Whishaw needs to communicate that Richard’s putting on royal authority one more time in order to abdicate his throne, and does it by moving from the light voice of his personal self and emotion, down to the deeper register, the voice of his authority. I want students to think about where the actor puts his voice, in what part of his body; in this clip you can hear Whishaw’s voice drop from a softer register that’s higher both in tone and in body placement, throat and head, down to a heavier resonance in his chest. This pattern recurs through the whole of the play; you need that weight behind the royal speech-act. It’s tempting to gender this difference–his lighter voice is more femme, the lower more masculine–because voices are so stubbornly gendered in culture. (We categorize voices by gender, right? bass, tenor, alto, soprano.) Don’t know if I’ll go there yet, but…Thank you, Ben. Thank you for being so damn good at what you do.

okay so just throwing this out there re: josie rourke’s quote about the donmar season being about young people finding their place in the world and casting such a young coriolanus

what if it becomes about a hero who’s the distillation of a generation that grew up under intense militarism (hello the us has been at war for half my life) and also with huge expectations from their parents that they’re not going to be able to fulfil (hahaha us)

i mean caius martius gets SO VERY GOOD at being what everybody wanted him to be but then they start hating him for being what they made him

does that sound like anybody’s recent criticism of the millenials to anybody else?

youtube

Monty Python’s Flying Circus “Upper Class Twit of the Year”

I cannot breathe I am laughing so hard.

Hey guys! Are you an actor? Looking for some great acting advice? Well today’s your lucky day! Listen to all this great acting advice given to me and Becca by an eccentric old Polish man while in the Time Sq station today:

  • You must wear bright colors.
  • Be Polish.
  • Improvise, it is the most important thing in acting.
  • Do you use a computer? Do not use computer. It will make you constipated.

Boom! There you have it!

I just found this extraordinary post.  It’s all Shakespeare but from THREE COMPLETELY DISPARATE PLAYS.

  1. “They do not love that do not show their love.” Julia, Two Gentlemen of Verona.  Act I, Scene II. 
  2. “The course of true love never did run smooth.” Lysander, A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Act I, Scene I
  3. “Love is a familiar. Love is a devil. There is no evil angel but Love.” Don Armado, Love’s Labors Lost.  Act I, Scene II.

I’m just flabbergasted.

[Submitted by betzine]

This is the Ultimate Quote Fail

Of Ultimate Destiny

Misquotes and Misattributions

As Far As The Eye Can See

And People Claim To Quote One

When They’re, In Fact, Quoting Three

This Is The Ultimate Quote Fail

Of Ultimate Destiny


FRIENDS ROMANS COUNTRYMEN

THE TIME HAS COME FOR ME TO PIT MYSELF AGAINST BBC ROBIN HOOD

IN MY CORNER: STACY (TUMBLR USER THEKNIGHTHERSELF, WHO IS V COOL AND YOU SHOULD GO CHECK OUT), YOURS TRULY, AND HER LEGALLY PRESCRIBED VICODIN

IN THE OPPOSING CORNER:

THIS TRASH:

THE TAG TO SAVIOUR (OR PAY ATTENTION TO, IF I’VE MANAGED TO FOOL YOU INTO THINKING THIS IS GOING TO BE FUNNY, IS ’THE POINTY SIDEBURN DEBACLE

LET’S DO THIS THING

One man's comedy is another man's tragedy: teaching The Merchant of Venice

A post by the marvelous dipthatpen called “Shylock After the War” got me thinking for the umptymillionth time about whether it’s feasible, reasonable, or wise to keep studying and performing The Merchant of Venice in an age after Auschwitz. Spoiler alert: hells yeah. Inasmuch as I’m teaching it in two weeks. My survey course this term is organized around the idea of marginality and self-definition: Shylock, like Othello, Cleopatra, Caliban, and other marginalized figures, exists in an exclusion zone, separated from the society which he nonetheless needs for his survival. At the same time, the Christians, who so love the terms “kind” and “gentle,” depend for their identity on a disconcertingly racist ideology that builds community on the exclusion of the other as much as the inclusion of the same.

Merchant is my favorite play to teach in this sequence because it shows how different marginalized groups get pitted against each other in the vicious divide-and-conquer of prejudice. In this play, you can’t talk about anti-semitism without talking about homophobia–at least, not the way I read it.

Keep reading

so my Hobbit feels have gotten tangled up in my Diaspora Judaism feels?

(there’s a super interesting post about Tolkien basing the dwarves on Medieval accounts of ancient Jews… I’m frankly too lazy to go find it right now, sorry, but it’s there and it’s cool)

I am embarrassingly Not Up on my Middle Earth chronology but I’m relatively certain that Fili and Kili (and possibly some of the other dwarves in the company) were born after the exile from Erebor? So they signed up for this journey to liberate a home that they’ve never even known. And we know part of Thorin’s charisma is his power as a storyteller (the song, man, the song) and like, I dunno, stories are really important to cultural continuity in Judaism and in a lot of Middle Earth cultures and to Tolkien personally, too, so I imagine that part of the reason they wanted to come was growing up with their uncle’s stories about this lost kingdom.

Basically I want fic of the dwarves telling stories about Erebor to strengthen each others’ resolve during their journey, and maybe like Bilbo listening in and that spurring his commitment to the quest (like it reinforcing the point that they don’t have a home and making him want to help them get it back).

betzine replied to your post: On masculinity, maturity, and the demure peen.

Admittedly, all I read of this post is “The demure peen.” I promptly lost it. But hey, I just got out of a 12 hour rehearsal, so that’s allowed. psh. the demure peen.

I know, I just love that phrase. And the fact that it’s so funny points up why it’s important, because “demure” is everything the patriarchal peen is not supposed to be. P.P. is supposed to be brazen, aggressive, belligerent, obvious–BIG. No thank you. Come here, lil’ demure penis friend, lemme give you a snuggle and a smooch.