best scenic design of a play

Remember when the Tonys was nutting in their pants over #TonysSoDiverse

Well here’s the break down of the winners:

In the categories where men and women can win (excluding best show awards) there were only 2 women who won

  • Rebecca Taichman for Best Direction of a Play for Indecent
  • Mimi Lien - for Best Scenic Design of a Musical

There were only 4 POC who won a Tony (excluding best show awards)

  • Mimi Lien
  • James Earl Jones - Special Award for Lifetime Achievement
  • Baayork Lee - Isabelle Stevenson Award
  • Alex Lacaimore - Best Orchestrations

Don’t let the Tonys fool you, once diversity isn’t mainstream profitable like it was last year with the Oscars and Hamilton they’ll drop you, consider it a ‘trend,’ and won’t mention it again

This isn’t about the fact that certain performers didn’t win but the audacity for the show to rub in the world’s face how diverse they are and gave themselves a pat on the back. and then continuing that idea this year while having even less diversity than before

2017 Tony Awards: The Complete Winners List

Who won big at the 71st Annual Tony Awards?

Kevin Spacey hosted the 2017 Tony Awards at Radio City Music Hall in New York City on Sunday, with plenty of big stars in attendance, including Josh Groban, Sarah Paulson, Cobie Smulders, Orlando Bloom, Nick Kroll and Taye Diggs.

Check out all the big winners below!

PICS: The 2017 Tony Awards Red Carpet Arrivals!

Best Play

“A Doll’s House, Part 2”
“Indecent”
“Oslo” *WINNER*
“Sweat”

Best Musical

“Come From Away”
“Dear Evan Hansen” *WINNER*
“Groundhog Day The Musical”
“Natasha, Pierre & The Great Comet of 1812”

Best Book of a Musical

“Come From Away”  – Irene Sankoff and David Hein
“Dear Evan Hansen” – Steven Levenson *WINNER*
“Groundhog Day The Musical” – Danny Rubin
“Natasha, Pierre & The Great Comet of 1812” – Dave Malloy

Best Original Score

“Come From Away” – Music & Lyrics: Irene Sankoff and David Hein
“Dear Evan Hansen” – Music & Lyrics: Benj Pasek & Justin Paul *WINNER*
“Groundhog Day The Musical” – Music & Lyrics: Tim Minchin
“Natasha, Pierre & The Great Comet of 1812” – Music & Lyrics: Dave Malloy

Best Revival of a Play

“August Wilson’s Jitney” *WINNER*
“Lillian Hellman’s The Little Foxes”
“Present Laughter”
“Six Degrees of Separation”

Best Revival of a Musical

“Falsettos”
“Hello, Dolly!” *WINNER*
“Miss Saigon”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role in a Play

Denis Arndt, “Heisenberg”
Chris Cooper, “A Doll’s House, Part 2”
Corey Hawkins, “Six Degrees of Separation”
Kevin Kline, “Present Laughter” *WINNER*
Jefferson Mays, “Oslo”

Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role in a Play

Cate Blanchett, “The Present”
Jennifer Ehle, “Oslo”
Sally Field, “The Glass Menagerie”
Laura Linney, “Lillian Hellman’s The Little Foxes”
Laurie Metcalf, “A Doll’s House, Part 2” *WINNER*

Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role in a Musical

Christian Borle, “Falsettos”
Josh Groban, “Natasha, Pierre & The Great Comet of 1812”
Andy Karl, “Groundhog Day The Musical”
David Hyde Pierce, “Hello, Dolly!”
Ben Platt, “Dear Evan Hansen” *WINNER*

Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role in a Musical

Denee Benton, “Natasha, Pierre & The Great Comet of 1812”
Christine Ebersole, “War Paint”
Patti LuPone, “War Paint”
Bette Midler, “Hello, Dolly!” *WINNER*
Eva Noblezada, “Miss Saigon”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Featured Role in a Play

Michael Aronov, “Oslo” *WINNER*
Danny DeVito, “Arthur Miller’s The Price”
Nathan Lane, “The Front Page”
Richard Thomas, “Lillian Hellman’s The Little Foxes”
John Douglas Thompson, “August Wilson’s Jitney”

Best Performance by an Actress in a Featured Role in a Play

Johanna Day, “Sweat”
Jayne Houdyshell, “A Doll’s House, Part 2”
Cynthia Nixon, “Lillian Hellman’s The Little Foxes” *WINNER*
Condola Rashad, “A Doll’s House, Part 2”
Michelle Wilson, “Sweat”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Featured Role in a Musical

Gavin Creel, “Hello, Dolly!” *WINNER*
Mike Faist, “Dear Evan Hansen”
Andrew Rannells, “Falsettos”
Lucas Steele, “Natasha, Pierre & The Great Comet of 1812”
Brandon Uranowitz, “Falsettos”

Best Performance by an Actress in a Featured Role in a Musical

Kate Baldwin, “Hello, Dolly!”
Stephanie J. Block, “Falsettos”
Jenn Colella, “Come From Away”
Rachel Bay Jones, “Dear Evan Hansen” *WINNER*
Mary Beth Peil, “Anastasia”

Best Scenic Design of a Play

David Gallo, “August Wilson’s Jitney”
Nigel Hook, “The Play That Goes Wrong” *WINNER*
Douglas W. Schmidt, “The Front Page”
Michael Yeargan, “Oslo”

Best Scenic Design of a Musical

Rob Howell, “Groundhog Day The Musical”
David Korins, “War Paint”
Mimi Lien, “Natasha, Pierre & The Great Comet of 1812” *WINNER*
Santo Loquasto, “Hello, Dolly!”

Best Costume Design of a Play

Jane Greenwood, “Lillian Hellman’s The Little Foxes” *WINNER*
Susan Hilferty, “Present Laughter”
Toni-Leslie James, “August Wilson’s Jitney”
David Zinn, “A Doll’s House, Part 2”

Best Costume Design of a Musical

Linda Cho, “Anastasia”
Santo Loquasto, “Hello, Dolly!” *WINNER*
Paloma Young, “Natasha, Pierre & The Great Comet of 1812”
Catherine Zuber, “War Paint”

Best Lighting Design of a Play

Christopher Akerlind, “Indecent”
Jane Cox, “August Wilson’s Jitney”
Donald Holder, “Oslo”
Jennifer Tipton, “A Doll’s House, Part 2”

Best Lighting Design of a Musical

Howell Binkley, “Come From Away”
Natasha Katz, “Hello, Dolly!”
Bradley King, “Natasha, Pierre & The Great Comet of 1812”
Japhy Weideman, “Dear Evan Hansen”

Best Direction of a Play

Sam Gold, “A Doll’s House, Part 2”
Ruben Santiago-Hudson, “August Wilson’s Jitney”
Bartlett Sher, “Oslo”
Daniel Sullivan, “Lillian Hellman’s The Little Foxes”
Rebecca Taichman, “Indecent” *WINNER*

Best Direction of a Musical

Christopher Ashley, “Come From Away” *WINNER*
Rachel Chavkin, “Natasha, Pierre & The Great Comet of 1812”
Michael Greif, “Dear Evan Hansen”
Matthew Warchus, “Groundhog Day The Musical”
Jerry Zaks, “Hello, Dolly!”

Best Choreography

Andy Blankenbuehler, “Bandstand” *WINNER*
Peter Darling and Ellen Kane, “Groundhog Day The Musical”
Kelly Devine, “Come From Away”
Denis Jones, “Holiday Inn, The New Irving Berlin Musical”
Sam Pinkleton, “Natasha, Pierre & The Great Comet of 1812”

Best Orchestrations

Bill Elliott and Greg Anthony Rassen, “Bandstand”
Larry Hochman, “Hello, Dolly!”
Alex Lacamoire, “Dear Evan Hansen” *WINNER*
Dave Malloy, “Natasha, Pierre & The Great Comet of 1812”

2017 Tony Award Nominations

Best Play:
A Doll’s House, Part 2
Indecent
Oslo
Sweat

Best Musical:
Come From Away
Dear Evan Hansen
Groundhog Day The Musical
Natasha, Pierre and the Great Comet of 1812

Best Revival of a Play:
August Wilson’s Jitney
Lillian Hellman’s The Little Foxes
Present Laughter
Six Degrees of Separation

Best Revival of a Musical:
Falsettos
Hello, Dolly!
Miss Saigon

Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role in a Play:
Denis Arndt (Heisenberg)
Chris Cooper (A Doll’s House, Part 2)
Corey Hawkins (Six Degrees of Separation)
Kevin Kline (Present Laughter)
Jefferson Mays (Oslo)

Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role in a Play:
Cate Blanchett (The Present)
Jennifer Ehle (Oslo)
Sally Field (The Glass Menagerie)
Laura Linney (Lillian Hellman’s The Little Foxes)
Laurie Metcalf (A Doll’s House, Part 2)

Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role in a Musical:
Christian Borle (Falsettos)
Josh Groban (Great Comet)
Andy Karl (Groundhog Day)
David Hyde Pierce (Hello, Dolly!)
Ben Platt (Dear Evan Hansen)

Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role in a Musical:
Denée Benton (Great Comet)
Christine Ebersole (War Paint)
Patti LuPone (War Paint)
Bette Midler (Hello, Dolly!)
Eva Noblezada (Miss Saigon)

Best Performance by an Actor in a Featured Role in a Play:
Michael Aronov (Oslo)
Danny DeVito (Arthur Miller’s The Price)
Nathan Lane (The Front Page)
Richard Thomas (Lillian Hellman’s The Little Foxes)
John Douglas Thomas (August Wilson’s Jitney)

Best Performance by an Actress in a Featured Role in a Play:
Johanna Day (Sweat)
Jayne Houdyshell (A Doll’s House, Part 2)
Cynthia Nixon (Lillian Hellman’s The Little Foxes)
Condola Rashad (A Doll’s House, Part 2)
Michelle Wilson (Sweat)

Best Performance by an Actor in a Featured Role in a Musical:
Gavin Creel (Hello, Dolly!)
Mike Faist (Dear Evan Hansen)
Andrew Rannells (Falsettos)
Lucas Steele (Great Comet)
Brandon Uranowitz (Falsettos)

Best Performance by an Actress in a Featured Role in a Musical:
Kate Baldwin (Hello, Dolly!)
Stephanie J. Block (Falsettos)
Jenn Colella (Come From Away)
Rachel Bay Jones (Dear Evan Hansen)
Mary Beth Peil (Anastasia)

Best Book of a Musical:
Irene Sankoff and David Hein (Come From Away)
Steven Levenson (Dear Evan Hansen)
Danny Rubin (Groundhog Day)
Dave Malloy (Great Comet)

Best Original Score Written For the Theatre:
Come From Away - Sankoff and Hein
Dear Evan Hansen - Pasek and Paul
Groundhog Day - Tim Minchin
Natasha, Pierre and the Great Comet of 1812 - Dave Malloy

Best Scenic Design of a Play:
David Gallo (August Wilson’s Jitney)
Nigel Hook (The Play That Goes Wrong)
Douglas W. Schmidt (The Front Page)
Michael Yeargan (Oslo)

Best Scenic Design of a Musical:
Rob Howell (Groundhog Day)
David Korins (War Paint)
Mimi Lien (Natasha, Pierre and the Great Comet of 1812)
Santo Loquasto (Hello, Dolly!)

Best Costume Design of a Play:
Jane Greenwood (Lillian Hellman’s The Little Foxes)
Susan Hilferty (Present Laughter)
Toni-Leslie James (August Wilson’s Jitney)
David Zinn (A Doll’s House, Part 2)

Best Costume Design of a Musical:
Linda Cho (Anastasia)
Santo Loquasto (Hello, Dolly!)
Paloma Young (Great Comet)
Catherine Zuber (War Paint)

Best Lighting Design of a Play:
Christopher Akerlind (Indecent)
Jane Cox (August Wilson’s Jitney)
Donald Holder (Oslo)
Jennifer Tipton (A Doll’s House, Part 2)

Best Lighting Design of a Musical:
Howell Binkley (Come From Away)
Natasha Katz (Hello, Dolly!)
Bradley King (Great Comet)
Japhy Weideman (Dear Evan Hansen)

Best Direction of a Play:
Sam Gold (A Doll’s House, Part 2)
Ruben Santiago-Hudson (August Wilson’s Jitney)
Bartlett Sher (Oslo)
Daniel Sullivan (Lillian Hellman’s The Little Foxes)
Rebecca Taichman (Indecent)

Best Direction of a Musical:
Christopher Ashley (Come From Away)
Rachel Chavkin (Great Comet)
Michael Greif (Dear Evan Hansen)
Matthew Warchus (Groundhog Day)
Jerry Zaks (Hello, Dolly!)

Best Choreography:
Andy Blankenbuehler (Bandstand)
Peter Darling and Ellen Kane (Groundhog Day)
Kelly Devine (Come From Away)
Denis Jones (Holiday Inn, The New Irving Berlin Musical)
Sam Pinkleton (Great Comet)

Best Orchestrations:
Bill Elliott and Greg Anthony Rassen (Bandstand)
Larry Hochman (Hello, Dolly!)
Alex Lacamoire (Dear Evan Hansen)
Dave Malloy (Great Comet)

Special Tony Award for Lifetime Achievement in Theatre:
James Earl Jones

7

TODAY IN THEATRE HISTORY: In 1979, Stephen Sondheim and Hugh Wheeler’s Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street opens at Broadway’s Uris Theatre. Len Cariou stars as the bedeviled barber and Angela Lansbury plays the cannibalistic cook in the production that made a piercing factory whistle infamous. The musical swept the Tony Awards, taking home the prize for Best Musical, Leading Actor and Actress, Director for Harold Prince, Best Book, Score, as well as Scenic and Costume Design.

For more on the original Broadway production of Sweeney Todd, including a look inside the show’s opening night Playbill, visit PlaybillVault.com.

8

TONY AWARD FOR BEST SCENIC DESIGN OF A PLAY:

  • Beowulf Boritt – Thérèse Raquin
  • Christopher Oram – Hughie
  • Jan Versweyveld – A View from the Bridge
  • David Zinn – The Humans

TONY AWARD FOR BEST SCENIC DESIGN OF A MUSICAL:

  • Es Devlin and Finn Ross – American Psycho
  • David Korins – Hamilton
  • Santo Loquasto – Shuffle Along
  • David Rockwell – She Loves Me

The nominees in BOLD are my picks.  Who do you think is going to win?

War Horse - the definitive guide

Later this evening, London says farewell to War Horse, after a record-breaking run. To mark the occasion (and in case it comes up in a pub quiz) we’ve produced a definitive guide to the show.

The show’s history

  • War Horse received its World Premiere at the National Theatre on 9 October 2007 and played in the Olivier for 92 performances until 14 February 2008 and was seen by over 104,000 people.
  • War Horse returned to the National Theatre for a second run playing from 10 September 2008 until 18 March 2009 for a total of 114 performances and was seen by a further 130,000 people.
  • War Horse transferred to the West End in 2009 with its first performance at the New London Theatre on 28 March 2009. War Horse will have its final performance at the New London Theatre on 12 March 2016 .
  • The New York production of War Horse opened on 14 April 2011 at the Vivian Beaumont Theater at Lincoln Center and ran until 6 January 2013.
  • In February 2012 War Horse opened at the Princess of Wales Theatre, Toronto, and ran until 6 January 2013.
  • A US tour of War Horse began in Los Angeles on 14 June 2012 visiting cities including San Francisco, Dallas, Boston, Washington DC, Chicago and Seattle, and toured North America until 22 June 2014.  It was followed by a visit to Tokyo, Japan in summer 2014.
  • An Australian production opened at the Melbourne Arts Centre State Theatre on 31 December 2012 and then toured to Sydney and Brisbane.
  • A tour of the UK and Ireland ran from September 2013 until February 2015, visiting Plymouth, Birmingham, Salford, Edinburgh, Southampton, Dublin, Sunderland, Bradford, Cardiff, Salford (again), Stoke-on-Trent and Bristol.
  • In October 2013 a German language production called Gerfärhten opened at the historic Theater des Westens in Berlin, where it ran for a year.
  • In June 2014, a Dutch language production of War Horse premiered in the Netherlands at the Royal Theatre Carré in Amsterdam as part of the Holland Festival.  It toured around the Netherlands (Rotterdam, Breda, Groningen, Apeldoorn, Rotterdam, Heerlan) and then went on to Antwerp in Belgium where it was performed in Flemish from 16 May – 14 June 2015.
  • War Horse toured to South Africa from October 2014 until January 2015, playing in Johannesburg and Cape Town.  
  • A Chinese-language production of War Horse opened in autumn 2015 at the National Theatre of China’s theatre in Beijing followed by a tour including Shanghai and Guangzhou. This collaboration is part of a partnership between the National Theatre of Great Britain and the National Theatre of China.
  • War Horse was broadcast to over 1000 cinemas worldwide by National Theatre Live on 27 February 2014.
  • On 25 October 2012 War Horse celebrated 5 years since its world premiere at the National Theatre. The celebrations at the New London Theatre were attended by an audience including Olympians, Paralympians, actors, sports stars and presenters.  It is now in its eighth year in London.
  • A BBC War Horse Prom inspired by the play and Michael Morpurgo’s novel took place on Sunday 3 August 2014 as part of the centenary commemorations of World War One.  It featured a new suite created by Adrian Sutton from his score for the original production, as well as other music from the period with performers including the Proms Military Wives Choir and Gareth Malone.
  • John Tams performed his song ‘Only Remembered’ from War Horse at the Royal British Legion Festival of Remembrance at the Royal Albert Hall on 9 November 2014.
  • A second UK tour of War Horse will begin in Canterbury in September 2017, and tour to Bristol, Liverpool, Oxford, Brighton, Bradford and Nottingham.

Audience statistics

  • By the time its West End run closes at the New London Theatre this evening, War Horse will have been seen by 2.7 million people in London and over 7 million people worldwide.
  • In February 2011 the 1 millionth patron to see the production in London met with writer Michael Morpurgo and was photographed with puppet horses Joey and Topthorn.
  • The National Theatre Live screening of the West End production in February 2014 was seen by over 350,000 people world-wide – breaking previous UK records for NT Live.
  • War Horse has been seen by The Queen, Prince Philip, Princess Anne, Prince William and Prince Harry as well as other famous faces including Michael Caine, Rupert Everett, Ethan Hawke, James Earl Jones, Tommy Lee Jones, Keira Knightley, Annie Lennox, Ian McKellen, Helen Mirren, Miranda Richardson, Alan Rickman, Meg Ryan, Will Smith, Steven Spielberg, Hilary Swank, Alec Baldwin, Natalie Portman, Cate Blanchett, Susan Sarandon, Sharon Stone, Diana Ross, Diane Keaton, William Shatner, Barbara Walters, Hugh Jackman, Ricki Lake, Kate Winslet, George Lucas, Blythe Danner, Joan Rivers, John McEnroe, Queen Latifah, Martin Sheen, Sarah Jessica Parker, Kim Cattrall, Billy Crystal, Sting, Madonna, Guy Ritchie, Angela Lansbury, Elaine Stritch, Michael Buble, Penelope Cruz, Javier Bardem, Martin Clunes, Liza Minnelli, Nicole Scherzinger, Gary Barlow, Sir Bob Geldof, Tom Daley, Philip Schofield, Tana Ramsay, John Hurt, Natalie Gumede, Sir Steve Redgrave, Bill Bailey, Elizabeth Jagger, Greg Rutherford, Mary Berry and Ronnie Wood,
  • Having seen the show at the New London Theatre, Steven Spielberg commissioned a new film adaptation of Michael Morpurgo’s novel, which premiered in January 2012 and starred Jeremy Irvine, Benedict Cumberbatch, Tom Hiddleston and Emily Watson. 

The puppets

  • The puppets in War Horse were created by Adrian Kohler and Basil Jones of South Africa’s Handspring Puppet Company, based in Cape Town.
  • It takes eight months to build a complete set of puppets for War Horse; they are handmade by 14 craftsmen and women.
  • The finished horse puppets weigh approximately 43 kilos for the body, including the puppeteers’ backpacks, and another 7.7 kilos for the head. They are made of cane, leather and tyvec, a material used in book-binding (for the manes and tails). The torso is reinforced with aluminium and able to carry a rider on top.
  • Joey, Topthorn and Joey as a Foal are each operated by three puppeteers - the Head, the Heart and the Hind. The three puppeteers work together to create the character of each horse and to produce the horse noises. 
  • Puppeteers train for eight weeks before they begin performing. Their training includes basic principles of puppetry before they work specifically on creating the horses.
  • War Horse has 23 puppets, including horses Joey and Topthorn, as well as a goose, two swallows and two crows.  

Awards

United Kingdom

  • 2007 Evening Standard Award for Set Design - Rae Smith and Handspring Puppet Company
  • 2007 Critics’ Circle Award for Set Design - Rae Smith and Handspring Puppet Company
  • 2007 Laurence Olivier Awards for Set Design - Rae Smith and Handspring Puppet Company
  • 2007 Laurence Olivier Awards for Best Theatre Choreographer - Toby Sedgwick
  • 2012 Whatsonstage Best West End Show Award
  • 2015 Mousetrap Award for Best Play

United States

  • 2011 Outer Critics’ Circle Award for Outstanding New Broadway Play
  • 2011 Outer Critics’ Circle Award for Outstanding Director of a Play - Marianne Elliott and Tom Morris
  • 2011 Outer Critics’ Circle Award Outstanding Lighting Design - Paule Constable
  • 2011 Outer Critics’ Circle Special Achievement Award - Basil Jones and Adrian Kohler
  • 2011 Drama Desk Special Award for Thrilling Stagecraft
  • 2011 World Theatre Award - Dorothy Loudon Award for Excellence -Seth Numrich
  • 2011 Broadway.com Audience Awards Favourite Play
  • 2011 Drama League Awards - Distinguished Production of a Play
  • 2011 Special Tony Award - Handspring Puppet Company
  • 2011 Tony Award - Best Play
  • 2011 Tony Award for Best Director of a Play - Marianne Elliott and Tom Morris
  • 2011 Tony Award for Best Scenic Design of a Play - Rae Smith
  • 2011 Tony Award for Best Lighting Design of a Play - Paule Constable
  • 2011 Tony Award for Best Sound Design of a Play - Christopher Shutt

South Africa

  • Fleur du Cap Award for Best Puppetry Design

Canada

  • 2012 Toronto Theatre Critics Awards Best Design - The creative team of War Horse
  • 2012 Toronto Dora Awards Outstanding Costume Design - Rae Smith, Adrian Kohler with Basil Jones for Handspring Puppet Company for War Horse
  • 2012 Toronto Dora Awards Outstanding Choreography - Toby Sedgwick for War Horse
  • 2012 Toronto Dora Awards Audience Choice Award - War Horse

US Tour

  • 2012 Best Presented Production - LA Ovation Awards

General information

  • War Horse runs for approximately 2 hours and 40 minutes including one interval
  • Suitable for 10 years plus
  • Over 950 people have been employed world-wide on War Horse

So, there you go. Everything you could want to know about War Horse. Now, there’s just one thing left for Joey to do: say goodbye to London.

This Guy’s 30 Best Musicals of All Time

With the Tony Awards tomorrow night and Hamilton Fever coming out everyone’s ass, including myself, I wanted to do the Internet’s favorite things and rank my picks for the 30 best musicals of all time. Of course, this is subjective, it’s tainted by my taste at every juncture, and there’s significantly more Sondheim on here than Andrew Lloyd Webber. And of course, this is based on the shows as they exist on the stage, not their hit-or-miss film counterparts. Have at it.

30. RENT (1996)

Writers: Jonathan Larson (Book, music, lyrics)
Director: Michael Greif
Most Famous Song: “Seasons of Love”
Is there a movie: Yes.
Does it blow: Yes.
The Plot: A group of twenty-something’s avoid responsibility until AIDS happens.
Why it’s great: Fuck the flaws, amazing songs, makes you cry.
Tony Awards: 10 nominations, 4 wins (Best Musical, Book, Original Score, Featured Actor: Wilson Jermaine-Heredia as Angel)

29. A FUNNY THING HAPPENED ON THE WAY TO THE FORUM (1962)

Writers: Burt Shevelove & Larry Gelbart (Book), Stephen Sondheim (Music & Lyrics)
Director: George Abbott
Most Famous Song: “Comedy Tonight”
Is there a movie: Yes.
Does it blow: Yes and no.
The Plot: A slave tries to win his freedom by hooking his master up with a prostitute.
Why it’s great: Funniest book of a musical ever.
Tony Awards: 8 nominations, 6 wins (Best Musical, Book, Actor: Zero Mostel as Pseudolus, Featured Actor: Jack Gilford as Hysterium, Direction, Producer)

28. LES MISERABLES (1987 Broadway)

Writers: Claude-Michel Schonberg (Music, Book in French), Alain Boublil (Lyrics, Book in French), Herbert Kretzmer (English lyrics)
Director: John Caird & Trevor Nunn
Most Famous Song: “I Dreamed a Dream”
Is there a movie: Yes.
Does it blow: Yes.
The Plot: A man learns the hard way to never steal a loaf of bread.
Why it’s great: You’ve now got “I Dreamed a Dream” stuck in your head and that’s reason enough.
Tony Awards: 12 nominations, 8 wins (Best Musical, Book, Original Score, Featured Actor: Michael Maguire as Enjolras, Featured Actress: Frances Ruffelle as Eponine, Direction, Scenic Design, Lighting Design)

27. DREAMGIRLS (1981)

Writers: Henry Krieger (Music), Tom Eyen (Book & Lyrics)
Director: Michael Bennett
Most Famous Song: “And I Am Telling You I’m Not Going”
Is there a movie: Yes
Does it blow: No.
The Plot: Not-so-veiled backstage musical about The Supremes that makes the Barry Gordy character look hella bad.
Why it’s great: Jennifer Holiday. Michael Bennett. Nuff said.
Tony Awards: 13 nominations, 6 wins (Book, Lead Actor: Ben Harney as Curtis Taylor Jr., Lead Actress: Jennifer Holliday as Effie White, Featured Actor: Cleavant Derricks as James “Thunder” Early, Choreography, Lighting Design)

26. ASSASSINS (1990)

Writers: Stephen Sondheim (Music & Lyrics), John Weidman (Book)
Director: Jerry Zaks
Most Famous Song: “Everybody’s Got the Right”
Is there a movie: No.
The Plot: The men and women who attempted to assassinate the President of the United States (successfully or not) sing and dance about why they did it.
Why it’s great: It succeeds way, way, way, way more than it should.
Tony Awards: Off-Broadway, but the 2004 revival got 7 nominations and 5 wins (Best Musical Revival, Featured Actor: Michael Cerveris as John Wilkes Booth, Direction, Orchestrations, Lighting Design)

25. FOLLIES (1971)

Writers: Stephen Sondheim (Music & Lyrics), James Goldman (Book)
Director: Harold Prince & Michael Bennett
Most Famous Song: “Losing My Mind”
Is there a movie: No.
The Plot: A bunch of former Follies girls and their husbands get together for the most depressing reunion ever.
Why it’s great: Reminder that musicals can crush your soul just like Edward Albee, but unlike Edward Albee they can be fabulous while doing it.
Tony Awards: 11 nominations, 7 wins (Score, Leading Actress: Alexis Smith as Phyllis, Direction, Choreography, Scenic Design, Costume Design, Lighting Design)

24. PASSING STRANGE (2008)

Writers: Stew (Book, Music & Lyrics), Heidi Rodewald (Music)
Director: Annie Dorsen
Most Famous Song: “Keys/ It’s All Right”
Is there a movie: Spike Lee filmed the show.
Does it blow: Hell no.
The Plot: A young kid from South-Central LA tries to find himself while a fat sweaty guy sings amazing rock songs.
Why it’s great: Super powerful, amazing score. Least lame musical ever. Stew needs to write another one ASAP.
Tony Awards: 7 nominations, 1 win (Book)

23. HAIRSPRAY (2002)

Writers: Marc Shaiman (Music & Lyrics), Scott Wittman (Lyrics), Mark O'Donnell & Thomas Meehan (Book)
Director: Jack O'Brien
Most Famous Song: “You Can’t Stop the Beat”
Is there a movie: Yes.
Does it blow: No.
The Plot: A fat girl becomes the world’s first fierce dancer-slash-civil rights activist.
Why it’s great: Best possible version of the bubble-gum musical, with a surprising amount of emotional depth.
Tony Awards: 12 nominations, 8 wins (Best Musical, Original Score, Direction, Book, Leading Actor: Harvey Fierstein as Edna Turnblad, Leading Actress: Marissa Jaret Winokur as Tracy Turnblad, Featured Actor: Dick Latessa as Wilbur Turnblad, Costume Design)

22. SUNDAY IN THE PARK WITH GEORGE (1984)

Writers: Stephen Sondheim (Music & Lyrics), James Lapine (Book)
Director: James Lapine
Most Famous Song: “Sunday”
Is there a movie: The show was filmed.
Does it blow: Nope.
The Plot: Dude totally ruins pretty much everything in his life, but paints a pretty baller picture.
Why it’s great: Sondheim’s most personal. Completely beautiful.
Tony Awards: 10 nominations, 2 wins (Scenic Design, Lighting Design)

21. HAIR (1968)

Writers: Galt MacDermot (Music), James Rado & Gerome Ragni (Book & Lyrics)
Director: Tom O'Horgan
Most Famous Song: “Aquarius/ Let the Sunshine In”
Is there a movie: Yes.
Does it blow: I kinda love it.
The Plot: Don’t ask.
Why it’s great: Groundbreaking on so many levels, revitalized the musical, and you can still jam out to it.
Tony Awards: 2 nominations, 0 wins

20. MY FAIR LADY (1956)

Writers: Alan Jay Lerner (Book & Lyrics), Frederick Loewe (Music)
Director: Moss Hart
Most Famous Song: “I Could Have Danced All Night”
Is there a movie: Yes.
Does it blow: No.
The Plot: Flower girl gets turned into a lady by a prissy British guy who regularly misplaces his slippers.
Why it’s great: Great conflict, great roles, great Cinderella story, great score.
Tony Awards: 10 nominations, 6 wins (Best Musical, Actor: Rex Harrison as Henry Higgins, Direction, Scenic Design, Costume Design, Conductor & Musical Director)

19. MAN OF LA MANCHA (1965)

Writers: Mitch Leigh (Music), Joe Darion (Lyrics), Dale Wasserman (Book)
Director: Albert Marre
Most Famous Song: “The Impossible Dream (The Quest)”
Is there a movie: Yes.
Does it blow: Does it ever.
The Plot: Crazy dude in jail puts on a play about another crazy dude to prove his innocence. Still gets executed.
Why it’s great: Possibly best “triumph of the human spirit” musical. Makes you laugh, makes you cry.
Tony Awards: 7 nominations, 5 wins (Best Musical, Actor: Richard Kiley as Cervantes/ Don Quixote, Direction, Original Score, Scenic Design)

18. THE PRODUCERS (2001)

Writers: Mel Brooks (Book, Music & Lyrics), Thomas Meehan (Book)
Director: Susan Stroman
Most Famous Song: “Springtime For Hitler”
Is there a movie: Yes.
Does it blow: Yes.
The Plot: Two guys swindle old ladies, objectify their secretary, and put on a musical about Hitler, and yet they are still lovable.
Why it’s great: I love Mel Brooks. Mel Brooks loves Mel Brooks. Enough that he cannibalized a Mel Brooks movie into a Mel Brooks musical, and it’s perfect (albeit largely thanks to that original cast, yes).
Tony Awards: 15 nominations, 12 wins (Best Musical, Book, Original Score, Actor: Nathan Lane as Max Bialystock, Featured Actor: Gary Beach as Roger DeBris, Featured Actress: Cady Huffman as Ulla, Direction, Choreography, Orchestrations, Scenic Design, Costume Design, Lighting Design)

17. A CHORUS LINE (1975)

Writers: Marvin Hamlisch (Music), Edward Kleban (Lyrics), James Kirkwood, Jr. & Nicholas Dante (Book)
Director: Michael Bennett
Most Famous Song: “What I Did For Love”
Is there a movie: Yes.
Does it blow: Yes.
The Plot: Dancers make pretty stage pictures and monologue about really depressing aspects of their lives.
Why it’s great: Michael Bennett.
Tony Awards: 12 nominations, 9 wins (Best Musical, Book, Actress: Donna McKechnie, Featured Actor: Sammy Williams, Featured Actress: Kelly Bishop, Original Score, Direction, Choreography, Lighting Design)

16. INTO THE WOODS (1987)

Writers: Stephen Sondheim (Music & Lyrics), James Lapine (Book)
Director: James Lapine
Most Famous Song: “No One is Alone”
Is there a movie: Yes.
Does it blow: Nah.
The Plot: A bunch of fairy tale characters get together and fuck up each others’ lives.
Why it’s great: Super fun, until it’s not. Then it has some really powerful things to say about responsibility and perspective.
Tony Awards: 10 nominations, 3 wins (Original Score, Book, Actress: Joanna Gleason as Baker’s Wife)

15. AVENUE Q (2003)

Writers: Robert Lopez & Jeff Marx (Music & Lyrics), Jeff Whitty (Book)
Director: Jason Moore
Most Famous Song: “It Sucks to Be Me”
Is there a movie: No.
The Plot: Muppets graduate college, their lives suck, then they die.
Why it’s great: So funny, so real, and remarkably original.
Tony Awards: 6 nominations, 3 wins (Best Musical, Book, Original Score)

14. CABARET (1966)

Writers: John Kander (Music), Fred Ebb (Music), Joe Masteroff (Book)
Director: Hal Prince
Most Famous Song: “Cabaret”
Is there a movie: Yes.
Does it blow: No.
The Plot: The Nazis come to power while Joel Grey looks the other way and sings fun songs.
Why it’s great: Brilliant concept (Hal Prince wouldn’t go full concept musical till Company, but still) and still powerful and relevant today
Tony Awards: 11 nominations, 8 wins (Best Musical, Original Score, Featured Actor: Joel Grey as Emcee, Featured Actress: Peg Murray as Fraulein Kost, Direction, Choreography, Scenic Design, Costume Design)

13. URINETOWN: THE MUSICAL (2001)

Writers: Greg Kotis (Book & Lyrics), Mark Hollmann (Music & Lyrics)
Director: John Rando
Most Famous Song: “Run, Freedom, Run!”
Is there a movie: No.
The Plot: Rebels attempt to overthrow a totalitarian state where they have to pay to pee.
Why it’s great: It shouldn’t work, but it does. One of the most original musicals ever - funny, insightful, with a great score.
Tony Awards: 10 nominations, 3 wins (Original Score, Book, Direction)

12. HEDWIG & THE ANGRY INCH (1998)

Writers: John Cameron Mitchell (Book), Stephen Trask (Music & Lyrics)
Director: Peter Askin
Most Famous Song: “The Origin of Love”
Is there a movie: Yes.
Does it blow: No.
The Plot: The glam rock star and victim of a botched sex-change operation Hedwig tells jokes, sings songs, and experiences general catharsis.
Why it’s great: Perhaps the only TRUE rock score for a musical (Passing Strange as well, probably), every song is great, every joke is hilarious, and the end is super cathartic.
Tony Awards: Off-Broadway, but the 2014 revival was nominated for 8 and won 4 (Best Revival of a Musical, Actor: Neil Patrick Harris as Hedwig, Featured Actress: Lena Hall as Yitzhak, Lighting Design)

11. CAROUSEL (1945)

Writers: Richard Rodgers (Music), Oscar Hammerstein III (Book & Lyrics)
Director: Rouben Mamoulian
Most Famous Song: “You’ll Never Walk Alone”
Is there a movie: Yes.
Does it blow: Nah.
The Plot: The relationship between a carnival barker and a millworker proves that domestic abuse is a-okay, provided the carnival barker’s ghost comes up to you after he’s committed suicide and tells you he loves you.
Why it’s great: As Sondheim puts it, “Oklahoma! is about a picnic, Carousel is about life and death.” Groundbreaking, and probably most responsible for proving musical theater can deal with as serious topics as drama.
Tony Awards: They didn’t exist.

10. THE BOOK OF MORMON (2011)

Writers: Trey Parker, Robert Lopez & Matt Stone (Book, Music & Lyrics)
Director: Casey Nicholaw
Most Famous Song: “I Believe”
Is there a movie: No.
The Plot: Optimistic white saviors don’t know what the fuck they’re doing.
Why it’s great: Funniest musical in years, with a shocking amount of a heart and a beautiful message about faith
Tony Awards: 14 nominations, 9 wins (Best Musical, Book, Original Score, Featured Actress: Nikki M. James as Nabulungi, Direction, Scenic Design, Lighting Design, Sound Design)

9. LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS (1982)

Writers: Howard Ashman (Book & Lyrics), Alan Menken (Music)
Director: Howard Ashman
Most Famous Song: “Suddenly, Seymour”
Is there a movie: Yes.
Does it blow: No.
The Plot: An experimental botanist bleeds himself out to get with a drag queen.
Why it’s great: Master-class in economy, legendary score, wacky concept realized brilliantly and with utmost sincerity
Tony Awards: Off-Broadway

8. COMPANY (1970)

Writers: Stephen Sondheim (Music & Lyrics), George Furth (Book)
Director: Hal Prince
Most Famous Song: “Being Alive”
Is there a movie: No.
The Plot: Dude plays third wheel for two and a half hours until Elaine Stritch hits on him.
Why it’s great: Prince-Sondheim pinnacle. RIP Elaine Stritch.
Tony Awards: 14 nominations, 6 wins (Best Musical, Book, Music, Lyrics, Direction, Scenic Design)

7. HAMILTON (2015)

Writers: Lin-Manuel Miranda (Book, Music & Lyrics)
Director: Thomas Kail
Most Famous Song: “My Shot”
Is there a movie: No.
The Plot: Dude goes on for three hours about not throwing away his shot and then literally does.
Why it’s great: Too soon and too high on the list? The amount of people I know who are hardly interested in theater but know FAR TOO MUCH about Hamilton is staggering.
Tony Awards: 16 nominations, 11 wins (Best Musical, Original Score, Book, Direction, Actor: Leslie Odom, Jr. as Aaron Burr, Featured Actor: Daveed Diggs as Lafayette/ Thomas Jefferson, Featured Actress: Renee Elise Goldsberry as Angelica, Choreography, Lighting Design, Costume Design, Orchestrations)

6. SOUTH PACIFIC (1949)

Writers: Richard Rodgers (Music), Oscar Hammerstein II (Book & Lyrics), Joshua Logan (Book)
Director: Joshua Logan
Most Famous Song: “Some Enchanted Evening”
Is there a movie: Yes.
Does it blow: No.
The Plot: White people realize how racist they are amid gorgeous scenery.
Why it’s great: Rodgers & Hammerstein’s best, along with their richest score.
Tony Awards: 10 wins (Best Musical, Actor: Ezio Pinza as Emile, Actress: Mary Martin as Nellie, Myron McCormick as Billis, Juanita Hall as Bloody Mary, Direction, Book, Original Score)

5. SWEENEY TODD: THE DEMON BARBER OF FLEET STREET (1979)

Writers: Stephen Sondheim (Music & Lyrics), Hugh Wheeler (Book)
Director: Hal Prince
Most Famous Song: I guess it’s probably “Johanna,” although I’d go “A Little Priest”
Is there a movie: Yes.
Does it blow: I like it.
The Plot: Pretty much an episode of Jerry Springer with songs.
Why it’s great: Expertly-plotted, with Sondheim’s best score, and creates tension in a way that’s never been matched in a musical.
Tony Awards: 9 nominations, 8 wins (Best Musical, Book, Original Score, Actor: Len Cariou as Todd, Actress: Angela Lansbury as Mrs. Lovett, Direction, Scenic Design)

4. FIDDLER ON THE ROOF (1964)

Writers: Jerry Bock (Music), Sheldon Harnick (Lyrics), Joseph Stein (Book)
Director: Jerome Robbins
Most Famous Song: “If I Were a Rich Man”
Is there a movie: Yes.
Does it blow: No.
The Plot: Milkman is totally chill until daughters fuck with his vibe.
Why it’s great: Erase from your mind all the high school productions with 14-year-old boys wearing fake beard as Tevye and search your feelings. You know it to be true.
Tony Awards: 10 nominations, 9 wins (Best Musical, Original Score, Book, Direction, Choreography, Actor: Zero Mostel as Tevye, Actress: Maria Karnilova as Golde, Producer, Costume Design)

3. GUYS & DOLLS (1950)

Writers: Frank Loesser (Music & Lyrics), Jo Swerling & Abe Burrows (Book)
Director: George S. Kaufman
Most Famous Song: “Luck Be a Lady”
Is there a movie: Yes.
Does it blow: No.
The Plot: Basically Pretty in Pink with gangsters.
Why it’s great: It’s literally so perfect, even high schools can’t fuck it up.
Tony Awards: 5 nominations, 5 wins (Best Musical, Actor: Robert Alda as Sky Masterson, Featured Actress: Isabel Bigley as Sarah Brown, Choreography, Direction)

2. GYPSY (1959)

Writers: Jule Styne (Music), Stephen Sondheim (Lyrics), Arthur Laurents (Book)
Director: Jerome Robbins
Most Famous Song: “Everything’s Coming Up Roses”
Is there a movie: Yes.
Does it blow: Let’s just say they have yet to really nail this one.
The Plot: It takes a woman all her adult life to realize she’s probably a sociopath.
Why it’s great: Best book of a musical ever, alternately funny and devastating, and psychologically-compelling, featuring the incomparable role of Mama Rose and the greatest climax in musical theater history.
Tony Awards: 8 nominations, 0 wins

1. WEST SIDE STORY (1957)

Writers: Leonard Bernstein (Music), Stephen Sondheim (Lyrics), Arthur Laurents (Book)
Director: Jerome Robbins
Most Famous Song: “Tonight”
Is there a movie: Yes.
Does it blow: No.
The Plot: Two lovers’ tragic romance stops rival gangs from dancing at each other.
Why it’s great: If musical theater really is the alchemy of drama, music, and dance, then you can’t really get much better than this. The combined talents of some of the greatest in the medium make it impossible to pinpoint its greatest asset, whether it’s the pitch-perfect score, legendary choreography, or stirring emotions it conjures from beginning to end.
Tony Awards: 6 nominations, 2 wins (Choreography, Scenic Design)

Agree? Disagree? Call me, beep me, if you wanna fight me.

THANK YOU FOR YOUR TIME.

why don’t we talk about the secret garden more 

  • basically the entire original broadway creative team was made up of women (book, score, scenic design, costumes, direction)
  • a beautiful story of familial and romantic love, grief, and acceptance 
  • that song “lily’s eyes” like the best male duet ever written yeah it’s from this musical 
  • one of the few contemporary musicals to be written for classical voices 
  • starz like mandy patinkin, robert westenberg, and rebecca luker 
  • and daisy eagan who won a TONY SHE WAS THE YOUNGEST PERSON TO WIN A TONY EVER
  • and baby john cameron mitchell baby hedwig playing adorable dickon 
  • and that’s just the OBC like laura benanti and steven pasquale were in the concert and philip quast starred in both australia and the west end 
  • like it’s one of the most beautiful scores ever written i just
  • pls listen to this score 
  • pls

Okay but can we talk about representation at the Tonys this year?!

- Openly bisexual host Alan Cumming
- Women won for lighting design of a play and a musical and costume design of a musical
- The Tony for leading actor in a play went to a character with autism and that play won the Tony
- A woman won for best direction and another for scenic design for Curious Incident
- A pair of women won for best book and score of a musical (and a musical with a lesbian protagonist at that)
- An Asian woman won for featured actress in a musical
- Fun Home won best musical and whose characters include multiple queer characters including one played by a child

I’m just really happy okay. REPRESENTATION MATTERS. Also Kelli O'Hara finally won a Tony.

My 2017 Tony Predictions

aaaaaaallright. no one asked for this, but I will do it anyway because I want to. also ignore all the lowercase because I’m lazy. what I want to win will be below the cut

note: this excludes all play awards because I haven’t seen them at all and best director/scenic design/lighting/costume for musicals because I haven’t seen the actual shows, only clips/press pics. 

Let’s GOOOOoooo!

musical - Great comet
musical revival - hello dolly
lead actor - ben platt 
lead actress - christine ebersorle
featured actor -  Andrew rannells (he deSERves it!!)
featured actress - jenn colella
book - great comet
score - DEH
choreography - bandstand
orchestrations - lacamoire for DEH 

Originally posted by serinocoyne

*~unpopular opinions/discourse under the cut~*

Keep reading

tony predictions

best musical: come from away (or dear evan hansen)
best musical revival: falsettos
best play: oslo
best play revival: the little foxes
best lead actor: ben platt
best lead actress: denée benton
best supporting actress: stephanie j block or rachel bay jones
best supporting actor: andrew rannells
best lead actor in a play: kevin kline
best lead actress in a play: cate blanchett
best featured actor in a play: danny devito
best featured actress in a play: michelle wilson
best book of a musical: dave malloy
best scenic design of a musical: rob howell
best original score: tim minchin
best direction of a musical: michael greif
best direction of a play: daniel j. sullivan
best costume design of a musical: paloma young
best scenic design of a play: nigel hook
best orchestrations: bill elliott or greg anthony
best lighting design of a play: christopher akerlind
best choreography: andy blankenbuehler
best costume design of a play: jane greenwood
best lighting design of a musical: japhy weideman

6

SCENIC DESIGN 2014 TONY NOMINEES:

Best Scenic Design of a Play

Beowulf Boritt, “Act One”

Bob Crowley, “The Glass Menagerie”

Es Devlin, “Machinal”

Christopher Oram, “The Cripple of Inishmaan”

Best Scenic Design of a Musical

Christopher Barreca, “Rocky”

Julian Crouch, “Hedwig and the Angry Inch”

Alexander Dodge, “A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder”

Santo Loquasto, “Bullets Over Broadway”

Congratulations to all those nominated!  Who do you think is gonna win?  Post your choices below.

Congratlations to the 2014 Tony Award Winning Designers!

Best Lighting Design of a Play: Natasha Katz, “The Glass Menagerie”
Best Lighting Design of a Musical: Kevin Adams, “Hedwig and the Angry Inch”

Best Costume Design of a Play: Jenny Tiramani, “Twelfth Night”
Best Costume Design of a Musical: Linda Cho, “A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder”

Best Scenic Design of a Play: Beowulf Boritt, “Act One”
Best Scenic Design of a Musical: Christopher Barreca, “Rocky”

Best Sound Design of a Play: Steve Canyon Kennedy, “Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar & Grill”
Best Sound Design of a Musical: Brian Ronan, “Beautiful: The Carole King Musical”

FUN FACT

With Ruthie Ann Miles’ win at the Tonys, a grand total of SIX Asian people have won a Tony Award.

  • Willa Kim, 1981 and 1991, Best Costume Design (Sophisticated Ladies and The Will Rogers Follies)
  • Ming Cho Lee, 1983, Best Scenic Design (K2)
  • David Henry Hwang, 1988, Best Play (M. Butterfly) [I couldn’t find a picture of him with his award, I’m sorry DHH, you’re still bae]
  • B.D. Wong, 1988, Best Featured Actor in a Play (M. Butterfly
  • Lea Salonga, 1991, Best Leading Actress in a Musical (Miss Saigon)
  • Ruthie Ann Miles, 2015, Best Featured Actress in a Musical (The King and I)
The Winners of the 2014 Tony Awards

Best Musical: “A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder”

Best Leading Actress in a Musical: Jessie Mueller, “Beautiful - The Carole King Musical”

Best Leading Actor in a Play: Bryan Cranston, “All the Way”

Best Leading Actress in a Play: Audra McDonald, “Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar & Grill”

Best Featured Actor in a Play: Mark Rylance, “Twelfth Night”

Best Featured Actress in a Musical: Lena Hall, “Hedwig and the Angry Inch”

Best Leading Actor in a Musical: Neil Patrick Harris, “Hedwig and the Angry Inch”

Best Play: “All the Way”

Best Revival of a Play: “A Raisin in the Sun”

Best Revival of a Musical: “Hedwig and the Angry Inch”

Best Lighting Design of a Play: Natasha Katz, “The Glass Menagerie”

Best Lighting Design of a Musical: Kevin Adams, “Hedwig and the Angry Inch”

Best Costume Design of a Play: Jenny Tiramani, “Twelfth Night”

Best Costume Design of a Musical: Linda Cho, “A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder”

Best Featured Actress in a Play: Sophie Okonedo, “A Raisin in the Sun”

Best Choreography: Warren Carlyle, “After Midnight”

Best Featured Actor in a Musical: James Monroe Iglehart, “Aladdin”

Best Score: Jason Robert Brown, “The Bridges of Madison County”

Best Director of a Play: Kenny Leon, “A Raisin in the Sun”

Best Director of a Musical: Darko Tresnjak, “A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder”

Best Book of a Musical: Robert L. Freedman, “A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder”

Best Orchestrations: Jason Robert Brown, “The Bridges of Madison County”

Best Scenic Design of a Play: Beowulf Boritt, “Act One”

Best Scenic Design of a Musical: Christopher Barreca, “Rocky”

Best Sound Design of a Play: Steve Canyon Kennedy, “Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar & Grill”

Best Sound Design of a Musical: Brian Ronan, “Beautiful: The Carole King Musical”

Special Tony Award for Lifetime Achievement in the Theater: Costume designer Jane Greenwood

Isabelle Stevenson Award: Rosie O'Donnell