best picture winner!

22nd Critics' Choice Awards Winners
  • Best Picture ‘La La Land’
  • Best Director Damien Chazelle, ‘La La Land’
  • Best Leading Actor Casey Affleck, ‘Manchester by the Sea’
  • Best Leading Actress Natalie Portman, ‘Jackie’
  • Best Supporting Actor Mahershala Ali, ‘Moonlight’
  • Best Supporting Actress Viola Davis, ‘Fences’
  • Best Original Screenplay ‘La La Land’ and ‘Manchester by the Sea’ (TIE)
  • Best Adapted Screenplay ‘Arrival’
  • Best Young Actor/Actress Lucas Hedges, ‘Manchester by the Sea’
  • Best Acting Ensemble ‘Moonlight’
  • Best Cinematography ‘La La Land’
  • Best Art Direction ‘La La Land’
  • Best Editing ‘La La Land’
  • Best Costume Design ‘Jackie’
  • Best Hair and Make Up ‘Jackie’
  • Best Visual Effects ‘The Jungle Book’
  • Best Animated Feature ‘Zootopia’
  • Best Action Movie ‘Hacksaw Ridge’
  • Best Actor in an Action Movie Andrew Garfield, ‘Hacksaw Ridge’
  • Best Actress in an Action Movie Margot Robbie, 'Suicide Squad’
  • Best Sci-Fi/Horror Movie ‘Arrival’
  • Best Comedy ‘Deadpool’
  • Best Actor in a Comedy Movie Ryan Reynolds, ‘Deadpool’
  • Best Actress in a Comedy Movie Meryl Streep, 'Florence Foster Jenkins' 
  • Best Score ‘La La Land’
  • Best Song ‘City of Stars’ from ‘La La Land’
  • Best Foreign Language Film ‘Elle’
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Oscars | 89th Academy Awards
IMDb complete coverage of the 89th Academy Awards

Complete History of Best Picture Oscar Winners  

Academy Awards: Best Picture Winners

All Quiet on the Western Front (1930)

Clark Gable and Claudette Colbert in It Happened One Night (1934)

Clark Gable and Vivien Leigh in Gone with the Wind (1939)

Humphrey Bogart and Paul Henreid in Casablanca (1942)

Gregory Peck and Dean Stockwell in Gentleman’s Agreement (1947)

Gene Kelly and Leslie Caron in An American in Paris (1951)

Marlon Brando in On the Waterfront (1954)

Alec Guinness, William Holden, and Jack Hawkins in The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957)

Anthony Quinn, Peter O'Toole, and Omar Sharif in Lawrence of Arabia (1962)

Sidney Poitier and Rod Steiger in In the Heat of the Night (1967)

Al Pacino and Simonetta Stefanelli in The Godfather (1972)

Paul Newman and Robert Redford in The Sting (1973)

Robert De Niro in The Godfather: Part II (1974)


Jack Nicholson, Peter Brocco, Josip Elic, Nathan George, and Will Sampson in One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (1975)

Woody Allen in Annie Hall (1977)

Robert De Niro, Christopher Walken, John Cazale, John Savage, and Chuck Aspegren in The Deer Hunter (1978)

Dustin Hoffman, Meryl Streep, and Justin Henry in Kramer vs. Kramer (1979)


F. Murray Abraham and Tom Hulce in Amadeus (1984)

Robert Redford and Meryl Streep in Out of Africa (1985)


Willem Dafoe in Platoon (1986) 

Tom Cruise and Dustin Hoffman in Rain Man (1988)


Jodie Foster in The Silence of the Lambs (1991)

Clint Eastwood in Unforgiven (1992)

Liam Neeson and Ben Kingsley in Schindler’s List (1993)

Tom Hanks in Forrest Gump (1994)

Mel Gibson in Braveheart (1995)

Jennifer Connelly and Russell Crowe in A Beautiful Mind (2001)

Sean Astin and Elijah Wood in The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003)

Clint Eastwood and Morgan Freeman in Million Dollar Baby (2004)


Leonardo DiCaprio and Jack Nicholson in The Departed (2006)

Javier Bardem in No Country for Old Men (2007)

Ben Affleck in Argo (2012)

Michael Keaton, Liev Schreiber, Brian d'Arcy James, Mark Ruffalo, John Slattery, and Rachel McAdams in Spotlight (2015)

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The “Best Picture” Show 2016

Oscar Best Picture Winners Final Images 2016-1927

THE LEGO BATMAN MOVIE


This is the best Batman movie in five years – during which time there’s been almost as many flicks featuring the caped crusader as there have been Best Picture winners.  

The LEGO Batman Movie and its star, as ubiquitous as his appeal is somehow never-tiring, gets what Batman v Superman never quite cottoned on to – that a film about a guy who dresses up in leather to fight villains called Egghead and Condiment King (as per the movie, yes, they’re real) is supposed to be fun.

Reprising his role as the highlight of The LEGO Movie, Will Arnett is joined by his Arrested Development co-star Michael Cera (Robin) in the fight against a cavalcade of bad guys, many among them a little too camp for modern iterations and here lead by Zach Galifianakis’ Joker, obsessed with his status as Batman’s No.1 adversary.

Opening with a spectacular parody of The Dark Knight Rises, The LEGO Batman Movie is best when riffing on its hero’s extensive legacy, even revisiting his earlier castings, drastic changes in tone and, lovingly, much-loved ‘Kapow!’ graphics of decades-past. The panoply of DC characters a treat for any fan, the surprise addition of villains from a slew of other cult favourites including a batch of Daleks, aka ‘British killing machines,’ will have any pop-culture enthusiast salivating.

Arnett is reliably superb, playing up the dark, brooding temperament popularized by Christian Bale, while Galifianakis envelops a Joker notably more engaging than Jared Leto’s turn in whatever Suicide Squad was. The whole premise slyly drawn from a central plot point of Christopher Nolan’s trilogy now duly adopted by blockbusters everywhere, the film too skewers some of the peculiarities of the Bat-verse hitherto unaddressed in most features.

Why, for instance, has no one figured out that the only person in Gotham young and rich enough to be Batman, is Batman? How does Bruce Wayne cope with being so dark and mysterious literally all of the time? Is there something more than a little weird about his relationship with the Joker?

All these questions are answered, playfully, with a thrilling Killing Joke Easter egg thrown in for good measure; only one of the gentle digs at Batman’s relationship with the clown king of crime.

As fun as it is, the novelty of Arnett’s character so evident in The LEGO Movie wears off in the film’s latter half as he is forced to maintain the shtick and LEGO Batman’s abundant levels of energy for an entire feature. Infrequent musical renditions and beatboxing from the central characters (definitely aimed at younger audience members) might also try the patience of some of the older fans, though a throwaway line about Batman never paying his taxes almost makes up for it.

One for the kids and any and every Batman fan out there, it’s fantastic to see that Animal Logic have done it again.

The LEGO Batman Movie is in cinemas on March 30

GOLDEN GLOBES 2017: FULL WINNERS LIST

BEST MOTION PICTURE - COMEDY OR MUSICAL:

  • WINNER: La La Land
  • 20th Century Women
  • Deadpool
  • Florence Foster Jenkins
  • Sing Street

BEST MOTION PICTURE - DRAMA:  

  • WINNER: Moonlight
  • Hacksaw Ridge
  • Hell or High Water
  • Lion
  • Manchester by the Sea

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MOTION PICTURE - COMEDY OR MUSICAL:

  • WINNER: Ryan Gosling, La La Land
  • Colin Farrell, The Lobster
  • Hugh Grant, Florence Foster Jenkins
  • Jonah Hill, War Dogs
  • Ryan Reynolds, Deadpool

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MOTION PICTURE - COMEDY OR MUSICAL:  

  • WINNER: Emma Stone, La La Land
  • Annette Bening, 20th Century Women
  • Lily Collins, Rules Don’t Apply
  • Hailee Steinfeld, The Edge of Seventeen
  • Meryl Streep, Florence Foster Jenkins

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MOTION PICTURE - DRAMA:

  • WINNER: Casey Affleck, Manchester By the Sea
  • Joel Edgerton, Loving
  • Andrew Garfield, Hacksaw Ridge
  • Viggo Mortensen, Captain Fantastic
  • Denzel Washington, Fences

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MOTION PICTURE - DRAMA:

  • WINNER: Isabelle Huppert, Elle
  • Amy Adams, Arrival
  • Jessica Chastain, Miss Sloane
  • Ruth Negga, Loving
  • Natalie Portman, Jackie

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR IN ANY MOTION PICTURE:

  • WINNER: Aaron Taylor-Johnson, Nocturnal Animals
  • Jeff Bridges, Hell or High Water
  • Simon Helberg, Florence Foster Jenkins
  • Mahershala Ali, Moonlight
  • Dev Patel, Lion

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN ANY MOTION PICTURE:

  • WINNER: Viola Davis, Fences
  • Naomie Harris, Moonlight
  • Nicole Kidman, Lion
  • Octavia Spencer, Hidden Figures
  • Michelle Williams, Manchester by the Sea

BEST MOTION PICTURE - ANIMATED:

  • WINNER: Zootopia
  • Kubo and the Two Strings
  • Moana
  • My Life as a Zucchini
  • Sing

BEST MOTION PICTURE - FOREIGN LANGUAGE:

  • WINNER: Elle, France
  • Divines, France
  • Neruda, Chile
  • The Salesman, Iran/France
  • Toni Erdmann, Germany

BEST DIRECTOR - MOTION PICTURE:

  • WINNER: Damien Chazelle, La La Land
  • Tom Ford, Nocturnal Animals
  • Mel Gibson, Hacksaw Ridge
  • Barry Jenkins, Moonlight
  • Kenneth Lonergan, Manchester by the Sea

BEST SCREENPLAY - MOTION PICTURE:

  • WINNER: La La Land
  • Nocturnal Animals
  • Moonlight
  • Manchester By The Sea
  • Hell or High Water

BEST ORIGINAL SONG - MOTION PICTURE:

  • WINNER: “City of Stars”, La La Land
  • “Can’t Stop the Feeling!”, Trolls
  • “Faith”, Sing
  • “Gold”, Gold
  • “How Far I’ll Go”, Moana

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE - MOTION PICTURE:

  • WINNER: La La Land
  • Hidden Figures
  • Lion
  • Arrival
  • Moonlight

BEST TELEVISION SERIES - COMEDY OR MUSICAL:

  • WINNER: Atlanta
  • black-ish
  • Mozart in the Jungle
  • Transparent
  • Veep

BEST TELEVISION SERIES - DRAMA:

  • WINNER: The Crown
  • Game of Thrones
  • Stranger Things
  • This is Us
  • Westworld

BEST MINI SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION:

  • WINNER: People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story
  • American Crime
  • The Dresser
  • The Night Manager
  • The Night Of

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A TELEVISION SERIES - COMEDY OR MUSICAL:

  • WINNER: Donald Glover, Atlanta
  • Anthony Anderson, black-ish
  • Gael Garcia Bernal, Mozart in the Jungle
  • Nick Nolte, Graves
  • Jeffrey Tambor, Transparent

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A TELEVISION SERIES - COMEDY OR MUSICAL:

  • WINNER: Tracee Ellis Ross, black-ish
  • Rachel Bloom, Crazy Ex-Girlfriend
  • Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Veep
  • Sarah Jessica Parker, Divorce
  • Issa Rae, Insecure
  • Gina Rodriguez, Jane the Virgin

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A TELEVISION SERIES - DRAMA:

  • WINNER: Billy Bob Thornton, Goliath
  • Rami Malek, Mr. Robot
  • Bob Odenkirk, Better Call Saul
  • Matthew Rhys, The Americans
  • Liev Schreiber, Ray Donovan

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A TELEVISION SERIES - DRAMA:

  • WINNER: Claire Foy, The Crown
  • Caitriona Balfe, Outlander
  • Keri Russell, The Americans
  • Winona Ryder, Stranger Things
  • Evan Rachel Wood, Westworld

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A LIMITED SERIES OR A MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION:

  • WINNER: Tom Hiddleston, The Night Manager
  • Riz Ahmed, The Night Of
  • Bryan Cranston, All the Way
  • John Turturro, The Night Of
  • Courtney B. Vance, The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A LIMITED SERIES OR A MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION:

  • WINNER: Sarah Paulson, People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story
  • Charlotte Rampling, London Spy
  • Kerry Washington, Confirmation
  • Felicity Huffman, American Crime
  • Riley Keough, The Girlfriend Experience

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A SERIES, LIMITED SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION:

  • WINNER: Hugh Laurie, The Night Manager
  • Sterling K. Brown, The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story
  • John Lithgow, The Crown
  • Christian Slater, Mr. Robot
  • John Travolta, The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story 

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A SERIES, LIMITED SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION:

WINNER: Olivia Colman, The Night Manager
Lena Headey, Game of Thrones
Chrissy Metz, This Is Us
Mandy Moore, This Is Us
Thandie Newton, Westworld

CECIL B. DEMILLE LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD:

WINNER: Meryl Streep

Moonlight (2016)

“Gone With The Wind”, “Casablanca”, “The Godfather Parts 1 and 2”, “Lawrence Of Arabia” and “Moonlight”. What do all these films have in common? They’ve all won Best Picture at the Academy Awards. It’s strange to see a film like “Moonlight”, a low budget feature that Oscars host Jimmy Kimmel jokingly said no one had seen in the movie theaters. Though it wasn’t my initial prediction for the top honor, director Barry Jenkins’s great film created a universe of tension and mayhem where coming to terms with your identity is a challenge in itself.

Over 20 years, we get to know Chiron (Alex Hibbert, Ashton Sanders and Trevante Rhodes), a homosexual youth growing up in Miami’s most poverty stricken slum, Liberty City. He is constantly bullied, first because of his awkwardness, but the harassment becomes more brutal as the reason centers around his sexual orientation. To make things worse, his mother Paula (Naomie Harris) neglects her son and is more focused on her crack addiction. Chiron finds solace in two places. First as a child with drug dealer Juan (Mahershala Ali) and his girlfriend Teresa (Janelle Monae) and then as he gets older, he starts having sexual feelings over his friend Kevin (Jaden Piner, Jharrel Jerome and Andre Holland). After losing touch with his childhood crush, Chiron, now a neighborhood drug dealer and Kevin, fresh out of prison and working as a cook, reunite years later, and Chiron finally tackles his sexual crisis as a means of going on with his life.

“Moonlight” was based on an unpublished play by Tarell Alvin McCraney which the playwright and Barry Jenkins adapted to screen. Generally, the action consists of momentary gaps between the dialogues which reinforced the realism and conflict among the characters. There was also the foreign film influence in the manner which the camera was filmed and the detailed close up on facial expressions. The final act reminded me of Ingmar Bergman’s “Persona” because of the intimate face to face embrace between the two lead characters in a small space far removed from the outside world. It created a first hand look into how Chiron and Kevin look back at the taboo nature of their gay relationship and the consequences it had on their lives. To add to the aesthetic cinematic experience, the chamber orchestra score by Nicholas Britell added an ironic yet mesmerizing touch to the action. One would expect nonstop rap and hip hop songs, but the seriousness of the story required a more soothing feel.

On the acting front, Jenkins assembled a fine group of performers that brought so much life to their characters. As Juan, Mahershala Ali, beautifully conveyed the profile of a man who has seen it all is immune to the decadence surrounding him day and night. Janelle Monae brought some compassion to Teresa, where her gentleness and kindhearted manner eased some of the pain for Chiron. The three actors who played Chiron and Kevin were each convincing in the age ranges of the same character and were similar to one another in looks and personality. But “Moonlight” belonged to Naomie Harris as the drug addicted mother. Just like Charlie Creed-Miles in “Nil By Mouth” (see review below), Harris didn’t just play a drug addict, she became the person and assumed all the baggage that her character possessed. The scene that would have gotten her an Oscar if it wasn’t for Viola Davis was when she demands drug money from her son while scolding him for spending time with Teresa. Her eyes bulged and her breath seemed labored. You feel her constant pain which she wears on her sleeve. Sometimes, you just get nominated in the wrong year.

As much as I enjoyed “Moonlight”, my vote was for “La La Land” for Best Picture and that seemed to be the case for 5 minutes. “Moonlight” is an independent film that wasn’t epic in its pace and appearance and was just plain depressing. It leaned more towards the small scale look of “Marty” but that film was more feel good. “La La Land” has the old Hollywood nostalgia of “The Artist” which I believed was its ticket to Best Picture. It had dancing, singing, Cinemascope, beautiful fashion and romance. In a nutshell, it was “Singin’ In The Rain” for the 21st century. What I hadn’t considered was the “Oscars So White” controversy of the last two years, where black actors and craftsmen were largely ignored. This resulted in a demographic shift in the AMPAS membership, leading to a more diverse voting body. They tend to perceive films a different way and decided that nostalgia should stay in the past. Also with LGBT issues being all over pop culture, that was an extra bonus. Normally, I’m not a fan of all these things being conglomerated into one feature, but at least “Moonlight” was a well made, well acted film, that just happened to have these characteristics. It didn’t politicize and it told a story about human strife that as I stated before brought to mind foreign language films of yesteryear. For that alone, “Moonlight” was a good choice for Best Picture. 

8/10

anonymous asked:

hey lucy what are some of your fave best picture winners? I'm trying to watch a bunch of them but I only really wanna bother w ones I'll prob like for now lol

the ones i’ve seen, roughly ranked: titanic, american beauty, moonlight, forrest gump, argo, lotr return of the king, the hurt locker, spotlight, birdman, slumdog millionaire, 12 years a slave, the departed, schindler’s list, casablanca, all about eve, silence of the lambs, the artist, west side story and no country for old men. i still have a lot to see

This morning director Ava DuVernay joins the growing list of women whose films received Oscar nominations for Best Picture without receiving a nomination for Best Director themselves.

The list of women who have directed Best Picture nominees/winners:

  • Randa Haines, Children of a Lesser God, 1986
  • Barbra Streisand, The Prince of Tides, 1991
  • Valerie Faris, Little Miss Sunshine, 2007 (her co-director Jonathan Dayton received a nomination) correction: neither Faris nor her co-director were nominated that year. 
  • Loveleen Tandan, Slumdog Millionaire, 2008  (her co-director Danny Boyle won the Oscar for Best Director that year)  
  • Lone Scherfig, An Education, 2009
  • Lisa Cholodenko, The Kids Are All Right, 2010
  • Debra Granik, Winter’s Bone, 2010
  • Kathryn Bigelow, Zero Dark Thirty, 2013
  • Ava DuVernay, Selma, 2015

Additionally Kátia Lund, co-director of City of God, did not receive a nomination for her work on the film despite the fact that her co-director  Fernando Meirelles did.

Only 4 women have ever been nominated for best director and only 1, Kathryn Bigelow, has won. 

jadethirlwall: #Repost @leighannepinnock
・・・
And then I have these 3 girls.. my rocks, my saviours, my sisters, my best friends, my bad ass bitches.. my absolute everything! #GirlPower at its very very best! ❤❤❤❤

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whoever made this video is a god send

10

On this day, Bernardo Bertolucci’s Best Picture winner The Last Emperor was released into theaters in Italy after a mammoth production.

The film required 19,000 extras over the course of the shoot.

Queen Elizabeth II was visiting Beijing on a state visit during filming of the famously immense coronation scene in the Forbidden City. In a rare instance, the Chinese authorities granted priority to the production over the Queen, who was therefore unable to visit the Forbidden City.

No private automobiles were permitted during filming, which meant that even Peter O’Toole, the film’s lone recognizable actor, were forced to rely on bicycles as a means of personal transportation.

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The final shot from all 88 Best Picture winners | Full list below 

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