best directors ever!

anonymous asked:

someone try to convince me phil wouldn't be the best movie director ever try ! me!

(i thought this said bee movie director but thats besides the point) i actually think dan would be quite good as a director considering he’s a control freak, which we could see clearly in the making of tabinof video where they were filming the trailer for their book. on the other hand i think phil would be great at writing scripts, post-production, and visual effects since he got his MA degree in those categories. basically phil would be the brains and dan would be the execution

@the-alexiad End Times just came up under my “watch it again” on Youtube so I rewatched a few eps and it made me so nostalgic awww

kaneki-ken-u-not  asked:

your jobs are cool! may i ask, what do you have to major in to be able to work as a character designer? I'd like to work in a similar field, but i dont know where or how to start

Hi

Thank you very much for your support :)

I m french, I love speaking english, but please forgive me if there is some english spoken mistakes :

To answer your question I would like to give you some advices and not a tutorial about how to become a character designer or how to draw cool stuff. You can find many tips about graphic design all over tumblr I suppose :)

I have to say that I m teacher since a long time, and more recently I had the chance to teach through Gobelins school as character design/ storyteller teacher.

I would prefer to share with you some informations that nobody use to share but who are much more important than graphic tutorials so I recommand people who read this post to share it a lot :)

I think the most important things I have understood to become art director / character designer is :

1/ practicing, I guess you have to find tutorials about drawing, you have to find life drawing lessons, you have to practice life drawing a lot, nude drawing a lot, you have to find a way to tell a lot of stories, thrygh comicbooks, animations, writing books, fiming..

2/ always focusing first on storytelling in your character design, and not only about “esthetic” , (I will talk more about it below)

3/ and staying curious of discovering many different influences from every kind of Arts or cultures or ages. (I will talk more about it below)

To be franck, I didn’t learn this job through my art school (Gobelins), but through my differents jobs as storyartist, comicker, character designer in real productions.

I mean that you can not do a proper design if you don’t have a strong story behind.

I also mean that my skills as a storyteller (storyartist, writer) are absolutely essential to be a good character designer / art director. for sure, 100%. I have became a better art director when I became a better storyteller (and I still have so much to learn of course)

A good design has to tell a good story. If not, whatever this design is good looking and with nice shapes, with nice brush photoshop made, it is not a good design but a vain design. You can not become a good character designer and less a good art director if you don’t understand that deeply.

The designs below from Ratatouille Pixar movie, are not about doing great esthetic designs (but they are also great good looking in that example) but they are first of all, created from a great story and created to push the story and to tell the story : you can understand relatonships, behaviours of each character, who is main character, who is second character,  through these  line up (below)

Pixar artists doesn’t care about puting graphic details, cool details, they remove all the details who don’t push their story deeper. Pixar artists care about what they are talking about. They want to stay readable, clear, coherent, meaningfull for the audience. This is the main difference between them and for example most of the designers from video games who lost themself in too many meaningless details in their designs (I love video games by the way^^ but they are not good example for you to follow to become a good designer for animation industry)

A good design has to be readable in one second, does not need subtitles to be uderstandable to an audience. that’s all. the rest is vain.

>>>>> in a word : a good design is like an ICON, it has to become iconic. For that purpose,you have to create a strong synopsis, a strong story then to imagine from that story  a strong, pure concept, pure idea to illustrate this story through one or several designs.


so a good design is about thinking good, not really drawing good… :))


 some other great and iconic designs readable in one second without knowing the movie, yes they are not drawing but it does not matter :

So : Do your personal stories, practice scriptwriting as much as drawing, all the time . As you can see, my last design are done from my personal project. I never split drawing and scriptwriting.

I mean don’t wait to get an art school to practice seriously, don’t wait to get a great job as character designer to practice. Practice seriously through many personal projects that you write yourself. So great companies and projects will come to you.^^

_____

learn how to write story through many scenario book or filming book:

here some books I suggest you to read as soon as possible and as much as possible:

in english I guess it is this one: but I m not certain sorry:

“filming” from Eisenstein:

http://www.amazon.com/Lessons-With-Eisenstein-Vladimir-Nizhny/dp/0809013509

in french : “lecon de mise en scene d’Eisenstein”

http://www.eyrolles.com/Audiovisuel/Livre/lecons-de-mise-en-scene-9782907114059

This book from Eisenstein is the most important book I have read about storytelling, and nobody knows it. Thomas Astruc, “Miraculous” creator, is the one who told me about it. There is a lot of books about scenario, storyboard, but none of them will learn you how about filming. This book explain you how the great director put deep meaning in their filming. This book tells about the scenography in a sequence. It explain you how to put meanings everywhere in a story, from the background design, through the character design, and to the storyboard of course.

another book I like is : Story from Mc Kee:

http://www.mckeestore.com/Robert-McKees-book-STORY_p_11.html

Why this book in particular? because it is made from “the Poetic” from Aristote. It is a very shematic book, hard to read, just take your time, take notes, make some exercices from it to understand it. It learnt me a mental grammar about how to think about a story.

____

so: conclusion : I have done a whole feature film screenplay about this personal project. My design are really stronger because they are made from a proper and strong story. This is the most important advice I could give to you.

My deep meaning is : a good drawing means something, tell a story. A good drawing is a drawing that you have thought about before you have started to draw.

Then I can give you some advices about my method of course but believe me, they are nothing compared to thoss about storytelling:

_ gather a lot of documentation and materials when you want to create a design. avoiding cliché is knowling deeply your subject. As I m doing a story about russian revolution and I m not russian, I try to gather many many information about the russian history , russian mythology, russian revolution, russian clothesabout this century, russian people…. This is not only about esthetic materials but about feeling the whole picture of your subject. so you have to read a lot, not only gather pictures.

_ Avoid to follow the “mode” but mix it.^^

I suppose you know we can not create stuff from nothing. We have to start from some pointin Art. But :

To create a new and interesting stuff, you have to mix two ancients stuff (at least) , not starting from only one influence.

My graphic style is a mix between many many influences. I don’t do “japanese stuff”, or “disney stuff”, or “comics stuff”, or “european stuff”, I have mixed everything I have learnt in my life.

Try to stay very curious of all kind of influences ; not only animation but Art in general, litterature, arcitecture, cinema, travelling, history of Arts (I have a History of art 2nd college degree which helps me a lot in my graphic researches). Try to stay open minded in every kind of cultures.

By example : Tezuka, creator of the manga, was very influenced by Disney. Kurosawa, best director ever, was very influenced by american cinema, georges lucas was very influenced by Kurosawa when he did Star Wars…..etc…

Try to discover as many art pieces as you can, never give up that in you whole life to stay inspired.

Personally I ma big fan of History, History of Arts, History of whatever in general. This is the main material I use for my work.^^

For that purpose , try to read many books, old books, shakespeare, Dostoievski, Homere, mythology books, whatever you want but really meaningfull books not only recent best seller(which are great of course^^ but do not focus only on them). this is a main part of your work , this is not lazyness don’t worry^^

same for movies: you can not tell good stories if you have nothing to tell :D : take the time to watch as many movies as you can, this is a main part of your work , this is not lazyness don’t worry^^  :

here some directors I love:

_ Kurosawa

_ Melville

_ Jonnhie To

_ Zemeckis

_ Nicolas Winding Refn

_ Mc Tiernam

_ Kurick

_ Takahata

_ Spielberg

My favorite movies :

_ Pusher II

_ Silence of the lambs

_ Benhur

_ Dersu Uzala

_ 10 commandements

_ Spartacus

_ Rush

_ Ikiru

_ Yojimbo

_ Kaguya princess

_ Munich

_ Mad max fury road

_ die hard 1

_ Hardboiled

_ A.I.

_ Contact


_ Compare yourself with the best artists in the world, not with your classmate in your artschool. If you want to be the best, and do the best production, be demanding and challenge yourself. Comapre your stuff to Pixar, Laika, Dreamworks, oldschool japanese mangaka and animator, ancient painters. Ask yourself why they are better than me? What should I do to improve myself? a lot of answer are not in the esthetic way but in the storytelling way believe me.^^

_ Don’t be shy, don’t be afraid to bother professional artists, show your work to professional as much as you can, ask them advice, be respectful with them and do whatever they will tell you to do to improve yourself. The only way to thank a teacher or a professional who helps you is to work harder and to follow his advices hardly.

_ Work full time, this is like a olympic game, this is serious : you have to be the best to get that kind of extremely competitive job. You need to implicate yourself a lot. You need to find a routine, you can’t work part time for this job. stay very implicated, stay extremely enthousiast.

_ To become better than other, that’s simple : work twice, triple more than other students. really. When a teacher, your boss seems satisfied, it does not have to be the end of the job.You have to impress people, not only satisfied them. Even if your boss seems satisfied, continue to improve your work after the deadline, until it is really great.

_believe in your potential but stay humble all your life, even after school, keep learning form others, never think you are the best.

Let’s stop for now, I hope it will help you and others people who wants to improve themself :)

8

Interview Magazine | Paul Anderson

[HQ]

Paul Anderson (Panda) talks about The Revenant, Peaky Blinders, Legend and Tom Hardy. Legend comes out November 20 and The Revenant will be out in limited release on December 25 and wide release January 8, 2016. Season 3 of Peaky Blinders is also due out in 2016.

*Top photo shared by Paul on instagram. Tom and Panda on the set of The Revenant (2014). @biggierayman “Another one!!!”

Paul Anderson and Team Arthur

As the protagonists of Steven Knight’s Birmingham-set television drama Peaky Blinders, the Shelby siblings haven’t had it easy. Tommy (Cillian Murphy), the second brother in age and the first in everything else, drowns his World War One shell shock with opium. His younger brother John (Joe Cole) is trying to raise his young children following the death of his wife. Ada (Sophie Rundle), the only sister, defies her brothers and marries local communist Freddie Thorne only to have him die unceremoniously between seasons. Finn, the last of the lot, is too young to be a part of the Shelby brotherhood yet remains at risk from their enemies. Then there is Arthur, played by Kennington, South London native Paul Anderson. As the eldest sibling, Arthur should be the patriarch, but he’s not, because Tommy got all the family smarts and Arthur got all the family rage. While he might not be smoking opium, he does plenty of self-medicating with whisky, cocaine, and visceral violence. By the end of the show’s first two seasons, Arthur has accidentally killed a young man in the boxing ring, tried to hang himself, and almost been murdered by Jewish gangster Alfie Solomons (Tom Hardy). Occasionally, however, Arthur channels his energy more productively as Tommy’s right-hand man. When he does, it’s infectious; he’s Arthur fooking Shelby, the sort of character that inspires YouTube supercuts. And because you never know quite where he’s going to fall, there is a certain audience affection reserved only for Arthur. As one YouTube commentor writes,  "The actor playing Arthur does a great job at making him really likeable even when he’s doing dumb shit.“

Until about seven years ago, Paul Anderson wasn’t an actor at all; he was a ticket scalper. "I loved it. A wealth of experience,” he recalls in his thick South London accent. “I earned a lot of money out of it, but that was all I got out of it. Artistically, there was nothing in that for me, so I’d always wanted to do something else.” Anderson did not, however, want to be an actor; “I always wanted to be a frontman in a band,” he says. “Not a footballer. Not an actor. Certainly not a policeman or a fireman. I wanted to be a lead singer. Nothing else,” he continues.

Keep reading

independent.co.uk
Soldier of fortune: Tom Hiddleston is set to become 2012's hottest new
Twelve months ago, only fans of the BBC show Wallander or maybe those who saw him in Joanna Hogg's film Unrelated would've picked Tom Hiddleston out of a crowd. The past year has rather changed matters. Rarely, if ever, has a British actor made such an impression so swiftly – working back-to-back with Kenneth Branagh, Woody Allen, Terence Davies and now Steven Spielberg, he has not so much made a breakthrough as smashed his way into the public consciousness with all the force of a wrecking ball.

Twelve months ago, only fans of the BBC show Wallander or maybe those who saw him in Joanna Hogg’s film Unrelated would’ve picked Tom Hiddleston out of a crowd. The past year has rather changed matters. Rarely, if ever, has a British actor made such an impression so swiftly – working back-to-back with Kenneth Branagh, Woody Allen, Terence Davies and now Steven Spielberg, he has not so much made a breakthrough as smashed his way into the public consciousness with all the force of a wrecking ball.

Even he can’t quite fathom it. Recently he went back to Rada, where he trained. “Some of the staff wanted me to come back and give dispatches from the front line, to give an illustration of what students might expect on the other side of their training,” he explains. “I sat in this room where I’d practised sword-fights and sonnets and Stanislavsky and it felt like I was there yesterday. And I remember saying, ‘I’m supposed to be sitting in the chairs where you are, listening to Mike Leigh or Michael Sheen or whomever.’ I couldn’t believe I was the person giving the talk.” k

We first meet in a private members’ club in Covent Garden, where Hiddleston and I have been assigned use of the fourth-floor library. Seated on an orange plastic chair, he’s tall, thin and handsome in an angular sort of way. His eyes are a fierce blue and his forehead high, supporting a mop of tight brown curls. The handshake is firm, the dress sense preppy – brown brogues, black jeans, and a navy blazer fitted over a white T-shirt. With his Eton education, he seems quintessentially English, though his father was born in Greenock. “When Scotland played England [at rugby], I would support Scotland with him,” he confides.

Given that he turns 31 next month, it’s not that Hiddleston is particularly young to achieve his successes. It’s just the rapidity of his rise that is so shocking. Much of it can be contributed to Branagh. After Hiddleston played his fellow detective in Wallander, and acted alongside him in a West End production of Chekhov’s Ivanov, Branagh wanted his co-star for Thor, the 2011 Marvel Comics blockbuster that he (rather surprisingly) directed. Hiddleston was earmarked for the role of Loki, the god of mischief in Norse mythology and the film’s main antagonist.

He was brought in by Branagh to read for the role, and when the studio executives saw the audition tape, they went wild. “They said, 'Who is that guy? Why haven’t we heard of him before?’” It was a question the rest of Hollywood has since been asking. Woody Allen got in quickly, writing him a letter to ask him to play F Scott Fitzgerald in his delightful fantasy Midnight in Paris. “I didn’t audition,” says Hiddleston. “I didn’t even know he was making a film. He just said, 'Dear Tom, here’s the script, I’d love you to play the part. We’re shooting in Paris in the summer.’”

Also cast in Terence Davies’ recent Terence Rattigan adaptation The Deep Blue Sea (playing Rachel Weisz’s lover), at the same time, he got the call to meet Spielberg for his new film, the First World War epic War Horse. “I remember going home that night and thinking 'What is happening to my life? How did I get here? I’m about to meet one of my heroes! Don’t fuck it up!’” He didn’t. By the time they finished, Spielberg leant across the table and offered him the film there and then. “I nearly whooped, wept, laughed and cried.” Even his agents were shocked.

Then again, it’s not hard to see what entranced Spielberg. Hiddleston must have seemed perfect for the role of the noble British officer, Captain Nicholls. He may not have any military experience, but it’s in his blood. His paternal grandfather was in the Royal Artillery, while his mother’s father was in the Navy. His own father, a scientist by trade, once ran a company that supplied artificial limbs to soldiers returning from the Falklands. Then there’s his father’s great uncle – the last Tom Hiddleston in the family – who was a sergeant in the British Army before he was killed in action, in 1916.

“I always found the extraordinary loss of life in the First World War very moving,” he says. “I remember learning about it as a very young child, as an eight- or nine-year-old, asking my teachers what poppies were for. Every year the teachers would suddenly wear these red paper flowers in their lapels, and I would say 'What does that mean?’ And in history, the next thing you learnt was that there was this terrible, terrible war, from 1914 to 1918, when the country lost an entire generation of young men. And I remember that really affecting me at a very young age.”

As a child, Hiddleston’s “musical instrument of choice” was the trumpet. When he was 12, he was selected at school to play the Last Post on Remembrance Sunday. “I remember feeling the weight of that,” he says. “That I was heralding the two minutes’ silence.” He even told Spielberg that “Americans don’t really understand” the British attitude to the Great War. “It was quite a European war until 1917, when the Americans joined up. They don’t have the same sense of the loss of innocence and the cataclysmic loss of life. A whole generation was wiped out.”

Though on one level an old-fashioned family film, War Horse doesn’t shrink from the reality, with jaw-dropping battle scenes every bit as shocking as Spielberg’s own Saving Private Ryan. Based on the novel by Michael Morpurgo (already the inspiration for a hit play), the story follows a horse bought by a Devon farmer (played by Peter Mullan) and raised by his son Albert (Jeremy Irvine), who names him Joey. When war breaks, the steed is sold to Captain Nicholls – “this agent of separation”, as Hiddleston calls him, “who divorces the horse from his boy”.

Hiddleston plays Nicholls with just the right level of nobility, promising to get Joey back to Albert when the war ends. “Other writers might have made him quite bluff, disciplinarian and possibly cruel. But Michael Morpurgo makes him kindly and decent, upstanding and modest, which I found very moving. That was one of the things that attracted me to the part. Having dug around in so much damage as Loki, here was a man with such a sensitive soul who found himself in uniform, and fighting on the front line.”

Hiddleston will be returning to the “wounded, troubled pain and volatility” of Loki this summer. After watching Thor emerge as one of last summer’s biggest hits (it took $450m globally), he is now the lead villain in The Avengers – which, if you’re a fan of the Marvel Comics universe at least, will be the blockbuster movie to end them all. It pits the all-conquering Loki against the titular posse of superheroes, gathered together from such recent smash-hit films as Iron Man, Captain America and, indeed, Thor.

Not surprisingly, given the exalted company that sort of get-together entails, Hiddleston calls the experience “entirely surreal”. “There was one day when, as Loki, I was sat on some steps, staring at the Avengers in front of me. It would be quite odd just to look at a grouping that involves [such actors as] Robert Downey Jr, Scarlett Johansson, Chris Evans, Samuel L Jackson, Mark Ruffalo, Jeremy Renner and Chris Hemsworth. But the fact that they were dressed in the most outlandish hero costumes was bizarre! And I thought to myself, 'This is the dizzy heights.’”

Still, he must be getting used to this state of disorientation after the year he’s just had. Ask him to put it into words, and he can only talk in clichés. “It all happened so quickly, I’m just concentrating on putting one foot in front of the other,” he tells me. What about fame? Is he worried about losing his anonymity? “I’m trying to cross every bridge when I come to it. I think it would be very dangerous to start planning the date at which I will be unable to go to Sainsbury’s.”

Fortunately, he has a stable upbringing to keep those feet anchored. Born in London, Hiddleston grew up in Wimbledon, the middle child of three (he has an older and younger sister). When he was 10, his parents moved to Oxford, after his father James won a job as managing director of a pharmaceutical biotechnology company with links to the university. “He was really stimulated by being an executive go-between, between these two worlds.”

Before Hiddleston’s mother got pregnant with his elder sister and gave up her work to concentrate on parenthood, she was an arts administrator and casting director for an opera company, having trained as a stage manager. “When I was in my teens, she was always one to suggest possibly going to the Picturehouse [arthouse cinema] rather than the Odeon,” he says. “So she was always peppering my appetite for Jurassic Park and Terminator 2 with an appetite for [Michael Winterbottom’s] Jude or whatever.”

Given this comfortable environment, it’s tempting to look for autobiographical details in Hiddleston’s work. In particular, Archipelago, his second film for Joanna Hogg, a story of upper-middle-class upheaval – or as he puts it, “the implicit tensions and struggles that happen within every family”. His subtle, painful turn as the aimless Edward is arguably his best to date, as the director mined him for information on what it’s like to be a young man of his age. “Joanna asked direct questions: what keeps you up at night? What nags at the corners of your soul in darker moments?”

He may well have thought back to his own family discord, when his parents divorced when he was 12. “It was very difficult and I always say that it made me who I am,” he told one interviewer last year, “because it made me take responsibility for my life and I saw my parents for the first time as human beings, not as perfect love machines. They were both very badly hurt. I mean, it’s hard enough when you’re ending a short-term relationship, isn’t it? I can’t imagine what it’s like to end a 17-year marriage. But I’m so proud of them and I couldn’t do without them and as a result [of the divorce] I have grown-up, intimate relationships with both of them.”

Talking of relationships, there is some confusion I want to clear up with Hiddleston. In the past, it’s been erroneously reported that Hiddleston was secretly married to the actress Susannah Fielding. Already featured in FHM last year, the Hampshire-raised 26-year-old made one of her first screen appearances in an episode of Wallander with Hiddleston back in 2008. Just checking, I say, but are you? “I am definitively not married. That was a big mistake. Don’t know where it came from.” But you are in a relationship right now? “Well, erm, I dunno actually,” he says, shyly. “That’s kind of an awkward answer, isn’t it?”

We leave it at that – after all, Hiddleston is not the sort you find kicking back in the centre pages of OK! magazine, even if his ever-growing circle of female admirers call themselves “Hiddlestoners”.

It was during his school days at Eton that he discovered acting, which he then continued at Cambridge. Reading Classics at Pembroke – the same college that legendary comic Peter Cook went to, he says proudly – he joined the Amateur Dramatic Club. “I love the acting community at Cambridge,” he says. “It’s really quite committed and serious, since the days of Derek Jacobi and Ian McKellen right through to Emma Thompson and Hugh Laurie.”

From Eton to Cambridge and on to Rada sounds as traditional an English education as you could get, I suggest. “In some ways it does and in some ways it doesn’t. Since my education, I’ve done quite untraditional things. There are very few Etonians who went to Rada. And far fewer Etonians – certainly when I was there – went to Cambridge. I don’t know whether it’s the same now. Most people I knew went to Oxford, because it seemed more of an easy bridge.”

Arriving at the time of the Laura Spence affair – the high-flying state-school pupil who was refused a place at Oxford, allegedly because of her working-class background – he says the entrance examiners put him through his paces. “They made sure I was able to think for myself and stand on my own two feet, intellectually. Cambridge is a meritocratic place. I know this sounds odd, but I met more kinds of people there than I’ve probably met in any place in my life. It seemed to be so international, and there were people from all walks of life, all backgrounds. Any chips on any shoulders had to be very swiftly removed, in any direction.”

When we speak for a second time, just before Christmas, Hiddleston has been “knee-deep in mud, blood and warrior poetry”, playing the title role in a new Sam Mendes-produced BBC film of Shakespeare’s Henry V. With plans to shoot Henry IV Part 1 and 2 in early 2012 – in which he will reprise the role as Prince Hal – it truly feels as though he’s taking over from his fellow Rada alumnus Branagh, who famously directed himself in his 1989 film of Henry V. Already dubbed “Branagh’s boy” in the press, Hiddleston clearly sees him as a mentor. “I trust him implicitly,” he says.

I ask whether he chatted with Branagh about taking on the role of Henry V. “Over the years, we’ve talked about it,” he admits. “He was very kind. He sent me an email when he found out. He just said, 'I heard about the Henrys. The very, very best of luck. You’ll have a fantastic time.’ I was going to ask him about it, then I thought, 'I don’t know.’ What I took from that email was that I had his blessing, in a sense. And I do feel Shakespeare is like an Olympic torch that gets passed on from generation to generation.”

Never mind the Bard: Hiddleston has taken the torch from Branagh, it seems, as he goes once more unto the breach.

[TRANSLATION] PSYCHO-PASS OFFICIAL PROFILING 2: Kagari Shuusei

Profile: Kagari Shuusei ・縢 秀星 + Execution Record

I know Kagari’s profile was translated a long time ago, I just decided to translate it myself as well because it kinda felt incomplete without him and Masaoka so…  As they say, for the collection. XDD  Since there’s no new info, as a bonus, I added Kagari’s record from the Dominator shooting history section. It could serve as another evidence of his death.


「俺もあんたも、他人の幸せが妬ましいってだけのゴミクズさ」

“We’re just human refuse who can do nothing but envy the happiness others have.”

 

「市民のためじゃない。俺は・・・」

“It’s not for the citizens, I-”

ID: 00457-AEQY-57889-2

Kanji name: 縢 秀星

Romaji name: Kagari Shuusei

Affiliation: Ministry of Health and Welfare, Public Safety Bureau, Criminal Investigation Department, Division 1

Occupation: Enforcer

Date of Birth: December 3, 2090

Age: 22 (the age when he went missing)

Blood type: B

Former address: Tokyo-to, Shin-Chiyoda-ku, Kasumigaseki, 2-1-B, MWPSB

Emergency contact’s address: Tokyo, Shinjuku-ku, Hyakunin-chou, B-5-14

Kagari Masanori (relation: father) 

Physical Examination: N/A

[Education and Career]

April 2096 ・ Designated a latent criminal during the Physical Examination for 5 years-old children carried out by Ministry of Health and Welfare 

・Confined to Hachiouji Rehabilitation Center

March 2103 ・Passed Scholarly Ability Certification Exam on secondary school basis

August 2110 ・Released from Hachiouji Rehabilitation Center

Keep reading

anonymous asked:

Anymore marching band au headcanons?

there are always more marching band au headcanons, my dear.

  • at their first game during freshman year, they’re in the stands and chilled drops his trumpet. the mouthpiece gets lost beneath the bleachers and the only thing that saves the trumpet is the bell being too wide to fit through the space. he literally started crying.
  • their band director is Dr. Exquest (thank u hella-rad-otps) and they’re the best band director ever B)
  • ze can play the canadian national anthem on his flute and sometimes when they’re practicing playing the american national anthem he plays the canadian one instead (he never does it during games though).
  • they normally have really cool shows , but ze’s favorite was the one they did about space. on the topic of space, he forced the rest of the boys to watch the entirety of Star Trek: The Original Series with him and all of the movies too (including the reboot movies) and chilled developed a really big crush on Chris Pine and made the rest of the guys watch Into the Woods with him.
  • every year the band puts on a special Halloween show where they dress up as zombies and play Thriller. it’s quite a bit of extra practice but everybody loves it.
  • smarty and tom start dating in freshman year but keep their relationship a secret for a really long time, until the time when ze starts serenading all the boys with flute music and smarty gets jealous of everyone thinking tom and ze are together.
  • galm’s house is the go-to for video game night, which is every Friday after the football game (even if they get home at like midnight) and they always end up sleeping in one big pile on galm’s bedroom floor.
  • when the band goes on overnight trips, the boys go to great pains to be seated near each other on the buses and to room together every time.
  • when fundraising time rolls around, it’s always a brutal competition between the boys to see who can sell stuff to the parents of the other guys (smarty usually gets to all the parents first and nobody can figure out how).
  • you can usually tell what kind of mood galm is in by whether he plays Talk Dirty to Me or Careless Whispers before class starts.
  • ze’s parents absolutely love chilled and have even gone so far as to call him their unofficial son. chilled is extremely smug about it and always jokes about how ‘once we get married, ze, i’ll really be part of the family’ while ze just rolls his eyes or flat out ignores him.
  • the boys actually wear each other’s clothes a lot, but by far galm has ended up with the most clothing stolen from him, and smarty is the one who steals the most clothing.

(previous marching band au headcanons)

anonymous asked:

Drama au! Kenma hates being on stage, but he is the best director ever. Kuroo always has to use a wig, because no one manages to get his hair to behave before show time. Yaku is gsnk hori. Lev and inouka keep on hitting the lamps with their heads. Lev is terrible at learning lines, but he has a lot of talent so they all have to deal with him changing the plot every night. Yamamoto is the in charge of sound, and they all have to convince him that rap music is not the best for every scene

leave a movie in my ask box, and i’ll answer ~~

1. did i watch it: yes | no

2. did i like it: absolutely not | not that much | i liked it | jeez i love this movie

3. favorite actor/actress performance:

4. do i think it’s the best movie this director ever made: yes | no