best college and universities

#optomstudies here with a post about university studying! I’ve been reading many study tips masterposts in the community, but some of these won’t work that well for university. So here are 3 tips for adapting to uni study!

Loose leaf? Notebook? Neither! (but if you must choose between the two, I recommend hole-punched loose leaf - easy to file :D) There is just no time, especially once you get to your higher years, that you will be able to write paper notes especially considering the level of detail that you are required to learn things to get good marks. 

When I was studying therapeutics, lectures were more like an essay crammed into 60-80 ppt slides! Using 10pt Calibri, 1.15 spacing, custom 1cm margins - I still had 12 pages for a 2 hour lecture (see below)

Two lectures / week, for 12 weeks! Although this was the most-content heavy subject, my other courses were still way too time consuming to write notes for. Sadly, you can’t summarise much, because MCQs pick at details.  

As for laptops, cheap netbooks are only ~$300, but I’d recommend these really great student laptops

And yet, you have to wonder why #studyblr doesn’t have more digital notes? Isn’t every studyblr the owner of a computer as a tumblr user? I’m trying to encourage everyone to feel more confident about posting their digital notes as part of the “#studyblrs get real” tag (see here), so if you have some great typed study notes, please tag me with #optomstudies and I’ll be happy to reblog you!

Read through your lecture slides so that you have a basic grasp of the topic before classes. If you have any readings assigned, do them too. This means that you’ll

  • go in knowing what concepts you need clarified
  • revise one more time (remember the forgetting curve?)
  • be much better placed to answer questions and participate in class discussions (get those participation marks!! ;))
  • find it easier to follow along with much more complicated topics than you’ve experienced in high school!
  • remember a lot more of the topic when you come back to revise later on!

Yes, I know, studyblr blasphemy right? But this is what you do when strapped for time. Particularly with biological/chemical sciences, lecturers will have basically summarised what you need to know on the slides. 

Before your lectures, read through the slides (should take about 30 minutes for a 2 hour lecture) and mark/circle anything you don’t understand - then when you get to the lecture, jot down a clarification in your own words based on the professor’s explanation. Eventually, you’ll find that you have studied the topic well enough to not need your own footnotes. 

It takes a little experience to know which professors have slides you can study off (tip: it’s usually the ones where you don’t have to write down much) but it’s totally worth the time you save!


Hope this has been an informative post about the differences between university and high school studying! Please follow me for weekly study tips, study pics and now kpop vocab lists!


MY WEEKLY STUDY TIPS

WHAT I WISH I’D KNOWN BEFORE UNIVERSITY STUDY TIPS SERIES

SEE ALSO My Tips This Past Month - It’s too long to list everything, see all original posts here and my study tips directory (web)

 + my cute stationery + my spreads!

I don’t know if you guys are aware of what’s been happening on Book Twitter the last few hours or so but someone on LitReactor wrote an article about why “Posting About Politics Kills Your [Writing] Career.” To the best of my knowledge, the article has since been pulled, and I wouldn’t have linked to it anyway because I don’t want to give the article clicks or the author money, but I’m going to be really honest with you guys for a second, cos I feel like I don’t actually post that much about myself or my personal life/background here.

Being vocal about politics has actually killed my mother’s dream career. She works in technology now, but when she was only a little older than me and pursuing her MA, she attended Beijing Normal University, which is one of the best colleges for teachers in China. She was bright and she was idealistic, and she’s good at talking and she loves teaching. She wanted to be a teacher. But then she participated in the Tiananmen Square Protests in 1989, and she was banned from holding government office, which teaching counts as, and so she’s never formally been a teacher.

And I’ve grown up with her stories about it. I’ve grown up being terrified of the social and economic consequences of my opinions. I’m not very loud on platforms that are attached to my real name (which is part of why I use a pseudonym; the other half is habit, because I was one of those Good Kids who listened to our computer teachers when they told us not to reveal personal info online when I was like 12, so), and I’m terrified of public and political backlash. I’m not ashamed of my opinions, but I’m terrified that they might produce material consequences against me, because they have produced material consequences against my mother.

But here’s the thing: I’ve never heard my mom express regret about it. She’s been sad, she’s been disillusioned with the protestors of 1989 (I am too, but that’s a different post and a longer story), but she’s still very loud about what her opinions are and what she believes to be right. Of course there are consequences to your speech. There will always be. But articles like these try to intimidate people, to hold them in fear, to stop them from speaking their minds.

And there’s something so fucking privileged about being so sheltered from politics that it doesn’t matter to you one way or another whether or not you participate them. There are so many people who are held a prisoner to politics against their will because governments have politicised their bodies, their very right to live and their right to access, and to, in essence, tell writers––especially marginalised writers––to shut up about being treated like a human is some type of bullshit.

Publishing has always been politics. It’s been political since the moment it began. The reason America exports so many books and imports so little has to do with American imperialism and global geopolitics. The choices that editors make––I will acquire this author and not that one––are politics. The amount of publicity we give to certain authors but not others––those are all political. Franz Fanon is political. Jane Austen is political. YA is political, SFF is political, the devaluation of romance as a genre is political. The privileging of literary fiction is political. Gatekeeping is political.

When everything in your life is impacted by politics, you will be political, and the books that you write, the posts that you share, will be political, and it takes some kind of nerve to be telling people to shut up because you aren’t impacted, you don’t care, and you’re holding people’s careers over their heads about it. It’s so fucking shitty, especially in times when we need to be political and push back against a state that seems now set on culling our rights.

I’s married now! 😍
My best friend
College sweetheart
Soulmate
Ruby (Steven universe reference 😂)
My Swiffer (insider) ….

You know it’s real when someone expands your heart in ways you never imagined . I remember us pushing each other to study during finals week. We never had much but we’ve alwsys had each other. We continue Holding each other through heartbreak. Learning and growing together. Becoming better people for ourselves and each other.
Our spiritual partnership is one that mirrors . Holding each other accountable in love and compassion.

You get on one nerve that no one else knows about lmao . But you make me laugh. You helped me understand what love looks and feels like. In the words of Zora Neale Hurston


“Love makes your soul crawl out from its hiding place ”


Thanks for choosing me this lifetime 😍😍😍😍

THE BEST ESSAY ADVICE YOU WILL EVER GET

Yo peeps, so as you can probably tell, I’m about to blow your mind. You might want to sit down, grab some water, you know, keep yourself hydrated. Maybe do a few stretches.

Now that you’re all ready, let’s begin! A girl who wrote about hotdogs and Costco got into Stanford and most Ivy League Schools, a student who wrote about his love for food got into Stanford, while Cornell’s admissions officer’s favorite essays were about lint and failing the driver’s test four times. Observing a pattern here? All these people chose kind of silly topics to write about. You might be wondering, “Yo,why would I want to sound stupid in front of the admissions officer, this doesn’t make sense!” . Well, that’s a valid argument. Now read this excerpt from one of the essays I mentioned above.

“While enjoying an obligatory hot dog, I did not find myself thinking about the ‘all beef’ goodness that Costco boasted. I instead considered finitudes and infinitudes, unimagined uses for tubs of sour cream, the projectile motion of said tub when launched from an eighty foot shelf or maybe when pushed from a speedy cart by a scrawny seventeen year old. I contemplated the philosophical: If there exists a thirty-­three ounce jar of Nutella, do we really have free will? I experienced a harsh physics lesson while observing a shopper who had no evident familiarity of inertia’s workings. With a cart filled to overflowing, she made her way towards the sloped exit, continuing to push and push while steadily losing control until the cart escaped her and went crashing into a concrete column, 52” plasma screen TV and all. Purchasing the yuletide hickory smoked ham inevitably led to a conversation between my father and me about Andrew Jackson’s controversiality"

Yes, yes, she’s literally talking about hot dogs and Costco. Now don’t underestimate her, this girl got accepted to 5 Ivy League Schools and Stanford. Jeez, that’s impressive. So now, you might be thinking , “Okay, enough of this, just get to the juicy part, give us the magic potion!” . Luckily enough for you, I’m getting to the point.

If you want to write an essay that slays everyone else’s like Beyoncé, first you gotta be true to yourself. You’re 17 or 18, you don’t want to end poverty or save the world. Maybe you enjoy pepperoni pizza, maybe you love watching horror films, maybe you love shopping at Macy’s, whatever it is, write about it.

The key is to choose a seemingly silly topic and present it in an intellectual light. Your ability to turn something silly into something genius will impress them and make you more memorable. In order to do that, you need to have a lot of knowledge about the topic you chose, which is why you need to be true to yourself. But then again, don’t write a pointless essay, don’t tell the officers that you can stuff 20 cheese balls in your mouth. Although I think it’s impressive, the admissions officer will beg to differ.

So there’s the secret formula to write a winning essay. Best of luck and I hope you get into your dream school!

Diyanshu Emandi

The Best (and worst) Ways to Save on Textbooks!

After I posted my overrated first year advice post, a lot of people were commenting on my advice about buying textbooks. I agreed so much with all of these comments, so I thought I would do a more comprehensive post about how I buy my textbooks and what I recommend for others. 

Disclaimer: Obviously, where you buy your textbooks can be influenced by so many factors (location, income, etc.) so don’t feel obliged to listen to all of this advice! It is just my opinion, and as always, different things work for different people. 

Go Ahead

  • Buy used from upper year students. This is my number one go to way to save money on textbooks. Meeting with an upper year and buying a book is reliable and just makes sense. Also, they aren’t trying to turn a profit, so it is often the best deal. 
  • Bargain with people who are selling. If you do decide to buy from an upper year, try to bargain with them to get the best possible deal. Often times they are just trying to get rid of the books, so if you offer to bundle them, they will give you a better price. 
  • Buy off of Amazon Prime, or another reputable seller. If you can get a better deal and the guarantee that your books will arrive within 2-3 days, why not? 
  • Buy the looseleaf edition and a binder, rather than the hardcover copy. I have seen books at my bookstore that are $300+ and the looseleaf copy is like $100. It is the exact same material in every way, except that it isn’t bound together, so it is definitely worth the money saved. 
  • If there is an electronic copy available, print it yourself. Make sure you have the rights to print it first, but if you do, then this is a great way to save. My politics prof made all of our readings available online to download, and I got them all printed for $9. Much cheaper than an actual textbook. 
  • Rent textbooks. I have to be honest, I don’t know a ton about renting, but there are usually websites and places on/around campus that let you rent a textbook and then return it at the end. Just make sure that it is considerably cheaper than owning the book. 
  • Share the book with a friend. If you know someone on your floor or someone you hang out with often, share the book! Make a schedule of when each of you will get it, and you only have to pay half of the cost. 

Proceed With Caution

  • Buying an electronic copy. This is a great way to save, as long as you are comfortable doing a lot of reading online. I definitely recommend this if you have a tablet, or are just used to reading online. If you like to take notes in a book, or you get a headache from reading online, it might be worth it to find a hard copy. 
  • Buying online from an unreliable site. This might apply more for my fellow Canadians/non-Americans because fewer sites offer good, quick shipping to us! I remember when I was looking for textbooks, I would think I found an amazing deal on a book, then see that it would take 6 weeks to ship. It isn’t worth it to be 6 weeks behind on readings to save a bit of cash. 
  • Buying from a bookstore off campus. I guess it depends on how willing your school is to screw you over, but at my school, the on-campus prices are the same as at Chapters. If they are the same price anyways, you might as well go for the convenience of the on-campus store. 
  • Checking it out from the library. I think this is a great idea if it is a light reading class, especially because textbooks are often on reserve at the library. However, if you have readings every night or a big project based on the textbook, it can be super inconvenient to have to check the book out every day. 
  • Buying an older edition of a textbook. I see this advice all the time, and I just don’t think it is good at all! It is very annoying that publishers do this, but usually a new edition is completely rearranged, and can often have different content and different homework questions. I made this mistake at the beginning of the year and got a book that had literally nothing in common with the class, so I ended up buying the new edition anyways. 

Other Ways to Save 

  • Make sure you actually need the book before purchasing. Look on the syllabus — not just under “required textbooks” but also under the course schedule. If there is only one reading from the textbook, try to borrow it from a friend or use the online version. 
  • If there is a reader, try to find the readings online. Sometimes profs will try to sell you a reader that has a bunch of readings from various sources. Often these are super popular readings like John Rawls or Judith Butler that can be easily accessed online. If you can find copies of them all of JSTOR or your school library, don’t bother with the reader. 
  • Take good care of textbooks that you buy so you can sell them next year. If you write and highlight in the book, it is harder to sell for a good price. If it is pristine condition, you can sell it for a bit less than the cover price rather than super cheap. 
  • It is a lot better to sell books to other students than to sell to the bookstore/online. If a textbook costs $50 new, you can sell it to another student for $40, whereas the bookstore would only pay you like $4.50. They really lowball you, so try to sell directly to other students! 

Sometimes I read Snowbaz fics and they are just so American
I don’t think people realise how different the UK is to the USA
I mean they live in South East England, a more accurate fanfiction would be:

-going for a cheeky Nandos

-trip to Margate (shitty beach, closest to London)(EVERYONE has been to Margate)

-or South End (Nearest beach on the northern side/near Essex)

-Baz having to deal with Transport for London’s tubes and buses and Oyster cards

-Borris Bikes!

-Disneyland Paris (euro star gets you there easy! 2 trains from London)

-Crying about University (not college!)(Baz goes to one of the best Universities in the UK)( are people going to ignore that?)

- Hipster tea house AU (which sell scones obviously)

- The West End! More theatre AUs

-Chessington World of Adventures (there best ride is called Vampire just saying)

-NORMAL AUs! They would go to Secondary school from the age of 11-16 (year 7 to 11)(exams from year 10-11 are called GCSEs)
And16-18 would be Sixthform where they would study four subjects to get them into uni (exams are called A-Levels)(This is what I do)(Message me if you need help there)

(Does anyone else in the fandom live in London? I feel lonely…)Add more to the list of just British AUs!

Foul Ball (Part 3 of Curve Ball)

Originally posted by darlingiamobsessed

Summary: Derek Hale college AU; Reader and Stiles become close friends, and the reader gets some interesting news.

Author’s Note: Yaaaaaay! The next part is FINALLY here! This was a ton of fun to write, so I hope you all like it! The next part will hopefully come a bit quicker!

As always, thanks to @snipsnsnailsnwerewolftales for beta-ing this, and for all the wonderful input and suggestions! Basically the whole movie section was written by her since I was having some writer’s block, so tell her how much you enjoy it as well! c;

Warnings: Just some language

*******************************************************************************************

“You’re going out tonight, right?” I asked Lydia, plopping down on my bed. She was busy inspecting the clothes in her closet as she answered, tossing a few things onto her bed.

“Yes,” she said, voice soft as she concentrated on her fashion choices. “I don’t plan to be back until probably Sunday. Aiden and I are hanging out.”

“For three straight days?” My tone came out as more shocked than I meant it to be,  maybe even a bit naive, earning a half-hearted glare.

“He says he wants to spend time with me and work on our relationship,” she defended, drawing out word as if it tasted bitter on her tongue, a hint of sarcasm laced somewhere underneath, poking the metaphorical elephant in the room. I was only half-listening now, pulling up tabs on my laptop and keeping an eye on my phone.

“So, you’re going to have sex all weekend,” I deadpanned, my voice a monotone of stating the obvious. Lydia turned to me and offered a wicked grin, making me laugh. “Just be careful.”

“What are you going to do while I’m gone?”

“Oh, a friend is coming over. We’re gonna binge watch Star Wars and probably eat lots of popcorn,” I explained, eyes scanning over the syllabus I had pulled up on my computer screen for one of my classes.

“Have fun with that,” she mumbled in reply, making me grin. Oh, the joy of being a nerd. Lydia left about an hour later, receiving a text from Aiden saying he was there to pick her up and whisk her away for their weekend long ‘important relationship building bonding alone time’, and, let’s face it, a very… eventful evening. I waited until she was out the door before scrambling for my phone to text Stiles and let him know he could come over any time.

Me: Time for a marathon, I hear it is. Ready and waiting, I will be. Get your ass over here, you should.

Me: Sorry. Yoda stole my phone, the little green bastard. Anyway.

Me: My roommate left so come over any time. :)

Keep reading

What your expensive post secondary education will not teach you

The best advice I can give to anyone going through the college/university experience is to enjoy it for what it is and to keep a fair balance between school and the rest of your life. It’s easy to get lost in the stress of it all, between classes and readings and assignments and midterms and papers and finals. But at the end of it, one day it will all stop and you’ll realize that all that worrying and stress don’t really accumulate to much.

You’ll have your piece of paper and some superficial designation, maybe some or no debt, a handful of good friends and a shit load of bad ones. But once you cross that threshold you’re in the real world with real world problems. You’re joining a pool of people with the same credentials as you and you’ll soon realize that “doing well” in school doesn’t account for much when you’re pitted against peers who pretty much look the same as you on paper.

So that’s what I mean when I say to keep a balance between school and life. The other parts of your life will mark you different in a world where so many of us look the exact same to potential employers. Nurture your hobbies and talents and don’t sacrifice them because you don’t have time. The fact that you do something else besides your chosen field of study, whether it’s music or film or whatever, will make you stand out of the crowd.

We’re each coming into the same mess and inheriting a world of issues and conflicts that we have little choice but to shoulder. Nurture and embrace all the factors that make you who you are and encourage others to do the same for themselves. In a world that requires experience for everything but refuses to provide any, you must be confident in presenting and defending any and every talent and skill you posses. This is something our expensive education fails to teach us completely.

If an adult says your dreams are unachievable use that as a drive to prove them wrong. Age 15 I got told by a careers counsellor that I would never be able to get into Exeter or Cambridge because I was going to get Cs at best in college. 

While I didn’t end up going to those two universities my A level grades were good enough for Exeter. I did better than any adult ever told me I would do. I got told I’d get Cs, Bs at best. I got full marks on EPQ, I got 2 A grades and B grade in my A levels.

Adults think they’re doing you have favour by telling you to be realistic, but the truth is if you aim high even if you don’t quite reach that height you’ll still be goddamn high up. Do not let people tell you you can’t do something, you deserve to try for those aims and see where you get, not be told you’ll fail at the first hurdle. 

anonymous asked:

What Are the best paid jobs ?

According to Forbes:

  1. Anesthesiologist, $235,070.00 per year
  2. Surgeon, $233,150.00 per year
  3. Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, $218,960.00 per year
  4. Obstetrician/Gynecologist, $212,570.00 per year
  5. Orthodontist, $196,270.00 per year
  6. Internist, $188,440.00 per year
  7. Physician/Surgeon/ all other, $187,200.00 per year
  8. Family and General Practitioner, $183,940.00 per year
  9. Psychiatrist, $182,600.00 per year
  10. Chief Executive Officer, $178,400.00 per year

Obviously, people who go to med school make bank. Just keep in mind that med school is hard. It takes a lot of time, discipline, and commitment.

The World’s Best Universities For Employment In 2016

It’s great to attend university to delve deeply into a field of study that you’re passionate about. But, at the end of the day, it’s also helpful to know that when you finish your years of higher education at a reputable institution, you will emerge with a degree that will give you a good chance of securing a job.
10 Things I wish I knew before starting college

1) Have a game plan before each semester starts. Make sure that you don’t overload yourself with too many units or extracurricular activities. Do enough while still staying sane

2) Take some fun classes that had nothing to do with your major. Branching out and trying new things is always good

3) Join clubs that interest you. See what is out there

4) Go to Professor’s and TA’s office hours and come up with questions you want answered. Going to office hours will allow you to stand out from the hundreds of students they see on a daily basis

5) Let go of toxic people. If they don’t care about you now, they never will

6) Make sure to use some of your free time for yourself, whether it is by exploring the city or watching a movie on a Friday night. Always studying and isolating yourself is not healthy. Small breaks are always needed

7) Take care of yourself. Make sure to stay hydrated and eat your meals. Sometimes we forget when we are stuck in the library all day

8) If you don’t have time to hang out with friends, ask them if they wanna join you to study, even if it may be in silence. Sometimes having company while you study will motivate you more

9) Friends will always come and go. But never let go of the ones that are there for you at your worst. Some of the friendships you make in college will last a lifetime

10) Reach out to close friends or to a therapist/psychologist on campus if you are going through anything rough. A helping hand will go a long way when needed