best actor 2012

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Asked how he felt when he got the role he said: “Extraordinary amounts of joy, immediately followed by a tidal wave of neurotic worry.

"You immediately think of Holmes past and present. What am I stepping into? Do I want to be recognised just for this character? You even start to curse your blessings. It’s a strange thing being an actor.” - Benedict Cumberbatch, Nominee, Best Leading Actor, BAFTA 2011, 2012, 2015

Mads Mikkelsen received the prize of The Best Actor in Cannes (2012) for his role in ‘The Hunt’, and he is the first Dane ever who get it. Actor Thomas Bo Larsen, who also have played in this film, says he is not envious to his colleague: “Not at all, I’m happy for my friend. And he sent me a text message saying that he is giving me 50 percent of the Palme,” says Thomas Bo Larsen to TV 2 News. “I had a honor to play with the world’s best actor as he has become.”

[TV 2 News, 2012]

“His became the Best Actor in 2012 for ‘The Hunt’ of Thomas Vinterberg? ‘It’s good for the periods of depression. When nothing works … It is a fragile craft, and it helps to navigate with certainty when there are any doubts. I’m the guy who always sees the glass half empty.’ But as a good citizen of Denmark, which is leading in the list of the most happiest countries, on a scale of 0 to 10, he gets 10. ‘As for my life and my family I don’t think we can be better than we that.’” - [x]

This year’s nominees for Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’ Pre-Show Nominee Luncheon. 

(from left to right) Gary Oldman, Jean Dujardin, Demian Bichir, Brad Pitt and George Clooney

The nominated performances this year for Best Actor are: 

  • DEMIAN BICHIR (as Carlos Galindo) - A Better Life
  • GEORGE CLOONEY (as Matt King) - The Descendants
  • JEAN DUJARDIN (as George Valentin) - The Artist
  • GARY OLDMAN (as George Smiley) - Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy
  • BRAD PITT (as Billy Beane) - Moneyball

‘Mads is phenomenal,’ Edwards says, when  I speak to him on the phone from San Francisco, where he is about to watch the final cut of Rogue One. ‘He’s a very, very smart guy and he has a very good sense of storytelling. He was a really good ally in that we tried to create a situation whereby even though there were about 400 people on set, we would be able to create  a little bubble around the camera.

‘Just the cameraman, the sound guy, me and the actors. We could convince ourselves at times that we were making a much more intimate film. And that’s what we wanted to try to combine: the sort of emotions and performances you get from a smaller and more independent film, but with the backdrop and epic scope of a blockbuster.’

Edwards knew he wanted Mikkelsen after seeing him in The Hunt, the Danish movie for which he won the Best Actor award at the 2012 Cannes Film Festival. In it, Mikkelsen plays a teacher accused of sexually abusing one of his pupils.

‘What I saw in that was this incredible contradiction to Mads,’ Edwards says. ‘There’s this tough, stoic armour that he can wear  very easily. But there’s also a real emotional vulnerability that he’s able to pull out of the  bag when he wants. As soon as I saw that  I thought, “OK, this has to be [Felicity Jones’s] father. We have to get this guy.” He’s the coolest guy. He just takes everything in his stride. Nothing fazes him.’ (article/pic)

12 Years a Slave: Yet Another Oscar-Nominated ‘White Savior’ Story

A few weeks back, I noted that there are not many movies about slavery. Given that, though, the list of slavery films that have been real contenders come Academy Award season has been surprisingly large. Besides 12 Years a Slave, which won a Golden Globe for Best Picture of the Year (Drama) on Sunday night and yesterday received nine Oscar nominations including one for Best Picture, films recognized in major categories on Oscar night over the past 30 years include Glory, (1989, Best Supporting Actor award), Amistad (1998, Best Supporting Actor nomination), Lincoln (2012, Best Actor award), and Django Unchained (2012, Best Supporting Actor award, Best Original Screenplay award).

Despite the number of films, though, there’s a relative paucity of thematic range. All of these critically acclaimed films use variations on a single narrative: Black people are oppressed by bad white people. They achieve freedom through the offices of good white people. Happy ending.

Read more. [Image: Fox Searchlight Pictures; Walt Disney Studios; Weinstein Company]