bernis eel

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Ribbon Eel | Rhinomuraena quaesita

As the adult male reaches full size (approximately 1 metre), it begins to turn into a female, and turns yellow. It will then mate, lay eggs, and die within about a month. Due to this short lifespan, female ribbon eels are a relatively rare sight. Females are yellow with a black anal fin with white margins on the fins.  So, they are not all different species, they are just differently coloured, according to sex…. which they can change during their life times!

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OMG it’s like swimming ribbon candy!

The ribbon eel (Rhinomuraena quaesita), also known as the leaf-nosed moray eel or bernis eel, is a species of moray eel, the only member of the genus Rhinomuraena. What is now known as R. quaesita also includes the former R. amboinensis. R. quaesita was used for blue ribbon eels and R. amboinensis for black ribbon eels, but these are now recognized as the same species. The ribbon eel is found in lagoons and reefs in the Indo-Pacific ocean, ranging from East Africa to southern Japan, Australia and French Polynesia. Although generally placed in the moray eel family Muraenidae, it has several distinctive features leading some to place it in its own family, Rhinomuraenidae.

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The ribbon eel or Bernis eel, is a species of moray eel. The presumed juveniles and subadults are jet black with a yellow dorsal fin, in adult males the black is replaced by blue, and adult females are entirely yellow or yellow with some blue to the posterior.

  • Phylum: Chordata
  • Genus: Rhinomuraena

The Ribbon eel, or Bernis eel, is a species of moray eel that grows up to 3.3 feet and is native to the Indo-Pacific ocean. This is the only moray eel that undergoes sequential hermaphroditism meaning it can change its sex at some point during its lifespan.