berehulak

PHILIPPINES. Manila. October 19, 2016. They Are Slaughtering Us like Animals. The blood of Florjohn Cruz stains the floor in his family home, where he was shot by police while fixing a radio for his mother. Police left a cardboard sign at the scene calling Cruz ‘a pusher and an addict’. Cruz had given himself in to police months earlier, admitting to drug addiction and promising to put an end to his habit, under a government amnesty program.

General News, First Prize, Stories at the 2017 World Press Photo Contest.

Photograph: Daniel Berehulak for The New York Times

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CHEERY RED - photography by Tarun Chhabra, National Geographic Your Shot - text: Janna Dotschkal

‘Tarun Chhabra’s 15-year effort to capture Indian culture in a “self-initiated” photo project has yielded this “good and rare picture” of Holi celebrants in India. Holi is the Hindu festival of love in which participants splash each other with bright colors that represent “energy, life, and joy.” Chhabra writes of the experience, “I was kneeling down in the middle of a group of people who were singing bhajans (devotional songs). People were throwing lots of water and colors, and I was fully drenched … My eyes were filled with water-and-color paste, and this was very irritating and painful. With great difficulty I tried to slightly open my eye … and found the beautiful moment unfolding just in front of me. People … were singing devotional songs, and red color was flying like clouds. This amazing moment [gave] me inner strength, and I dared to open my eye slightly more to compose the picture.”

1) ©Tarun Chhabra 2) ©Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images 3) ©Kevin Frayer/AP Photo 4) ©Achal Mishra

PHILIPPINES. Manila. October 9, 2016. They Are Slaughtering Us Like Animals. Jimji, 6, cries out in anguish, saying “Papa!” as workers prepare to move the body of her slain father for burial. President Rodrigo Duterte of the Philippines currently oversees a brutal campaign against suspected drug users or dealers, with a call to “slaughter them all.”

General News, First Prize, Stories at the 2017 World Press Photo Contest.

Photograph: Daniel Berehulak for The New York Times

PHILIPPINES. Manila. October 11, 2016. They Are Slaughtering Us Like Animals. Heavy rain pours as police operatives investigate inside an alley where a victim, Romeo Joel Torres Fontanilla (37) was killed by two unidentified gunmen riding motorcycles in the early morning. 

President Rodrigo Duterte of the Philippines began his anti-drug campaign when he took office on June 30, 2016. Since then, more than 2,000 people have been slain at the hands of the police alone. Beyond those killed in official drug operations, the Philippine National Police have counted more than 3,500 unsolved homicides since July 1. The victims, suspected users and pushers, are not afforded any semblance of due process.

General News, First Prize, Stories at the World Press Photo Contest.

Photograph: Daniel Berehulak for The New York Times

PHILIPPINES. Pasay city. October 2, 2016. They Are Slaughtering Us Like Animals. Police investigators near the body of Michael Araja, 29, who neighbours said was killed by two men riding by on a motorbike, as part of President Duterte’s war on drugs.

General News, First Prize, Stories at the 2017 World Press Photo Contest.

Photograph: Daniel Berehulak for The New York Times

By now, you’ve probably seen the photo of Aylan Kurdi, the 3-year-old refugee from Syria who died with his 5-year-old brother and mother after their small rubber boat capsized on its way to Greece. You might remember his velcro shoes. His red shirt. His lifeless body lying face down in the sand.

The image has opened a debate about the ethics of publishing photos of children suffering and dying. But regardless of one’s position, the photo is now part of a tradition — another iconic image of a child that has shaped our understanding of global events and that will likely live on in our minds for years to come.

In 2000, former Washington Post photographer Carol Guzy spent time at a refugee camp in Albania during the Kosovo crisis and took a photo that won the Pulitzer Prize — one of four in her career. It depicts a young boy being passed through a barbed wire fence at the border.

“It’s actually a joyful photo,” Guzy says. “Families that had escaped ethnic cleansing did not know if their loved ones had survived or not, were lined up on along that fence.” When one family saw their relatives on the other side of the barbed wire, they celebrated and handed their young children back and forth while waiting to be reunited.

Guzy says images of children are particularly moving. “It’s something about being completely at the mercy of events happening around you, and being unable to protect yourself — children especially — that reaches the heart and soul of people,” she says.

An Image Of A Child Can Change The Way We See The World

Top image: Family members, reunited after fleeing Kosovo, pass 2-year-old Agim Shala through the barbed wire fence into the hands of his grandparents at a camp in Albania. The photo was taken on March 3, 1999.Carol Guzy/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Bottom image: James Dorbor, age 8, was suspected of having Ebola. Medical staff in protective gear carried him into a treatment center on September 5, 2014, in Monrovia, Liberia.Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images

PHILIPPINES. Quezon City. October 26, 2016. They Are Slaughtering Us Like Animals. A 17-year-old a few hours after she was killed by masked gunmen. Filipino president Rodrigo Duterte has launched after his inauguration a new brutal “war on drugs”, with vigilantes and armed forces allowed to deal with the threat as they see fit. As of now, thousands of suspected drug dealers and users have been killed without any kind of supervision.

General News, First Prize, Stories at the 2017 World Press Photo Contest.

Photograph: Daniel Berehulak for The New York Times