benthic fish

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Crinoids, sea star, snails and a bony fish surrounding and living in a ghost nets,  recorded in 2012 Off Ozuchi, in Japan, at 493 m depth.

Derelict fishing gear, sometimes referred to as “ghost gear” or “ghost nets” is any discarded, lost, or abandoned, fishing gear in the environment. This gear continues to fish and trap animals, entangle and potentially kill marine life, smother habitat, and act as a hazard to navigation. 

Derelict fishing gear, such as nets or traps and pots, is one of the main types of debris impacting the marine environment today.

  • video: ID HPD1384C1HDB2026_01494500_01511400/ JAMSTEC
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Following on from the series, here is my “Mucky Secrets” documentary in full. It’s a nature documentary about the marine life of the Lembeh Strait at the heart of the Coral Triangle off north Sulawesi in Indonesia. The Lembeh Strait is a popular scuba diving destination, famed for its excellent “muck diving”. A huge diversity of weird and wonderful marine creatures can be found on the mucky seabed, including everything from tropical fish to benthic sharks to nudibranchs. Critters compete for survival with an armoury including camouflage, mimicry, toxicity, and dazzling coloration.

“Mucky Secrets” is an excellent resource for scuba divers, aquarists, marine biology students and anybody interested in the underwater world. The documentary features underwater macro footage from many of Lembeh’s famous dive sites including Critter Hunt, Police Pier, Tanjung Kusu-Kusu, Nudi Falls, Aer Perang, Jahir, Makawide, Nudi Retreat, Retak Larry, TK (Teluk Kembahu), Hairball and Aw Shucks.

Marine life featured in the film:

0:00:00 Introduction
0:05:11 Corals
0:05:57 Tunicates - sea squirts - ascidians
0:06:37 Symbiosis - sea anemones - anemonefish (clownfish)

CRUSTACEANS
0:07:29 Commensal shrimps (partner shrimps)
0:09:12 Emperor shrimp
0:11:07 Mantis shrimps
0:12:34 Squat lobsters
0:13:27 Hermit crabs
0:14:26 True crabs
0:15:55 Sea Urchins

ELASMOBRANCHS
0:17:11 Blue spotted stingrays
0:18:15 Brownbanded bamboo shark

EELS
0:18:59 Snake eels
0:20:27 Moray eels
0:21:34 Ribbon eels

REEF FISHES
0:22:33 Cardinalfishes
0:24:43 Trumpetfish
0:25:58 Seahorses
0:27:06 Pygmy seahorse
0:28:30 Pipefishes
0:30:38 Ghost pipefishes
0:33:22 Shrimpfishes - razorfishes
0:33:58 Seamoths - short dragonfish
0:35:03 Oriental flying gurnard
0:35:58 Blennies
0:36:49 Gobies
0:37:46 Sea pen
0:38:17 Dragonets
0:40:49 Mandarinfish
0:42:08 Frogfishes
0:46:39 Juvenile fishes
0:47:12 Spotted parrotfish
0:48:20 Sweetlips
0:49:05 Yellowblotch razorfish
0:49:37 Filefishes
0:50:24 Boxfishes - cowfishes
0:50:57 Puffers (pufferfish)
0:52:21 Sharpnose puffers (tobies)
0:52:50 Porcupinefishes
0:53:45 Panther grouper
0:54:10 Whitemargin stargazer
0:54:54 Leopard flounder
0:55:25 Flatheads
0:56:36 Scorpionfishes
0:57:27 Ambon Scorpionfish
0:58:04 Rhinopias
0:59:50 Lionfishes
1:02:29 Demon stinger (spiny devilfish, bearded ghoul)
1:03:17 Fireworm
1:03:45 Waspfishes

MOLLUSCS
CEPHALOPODS
1:05:48 Cuttlefishes
1:08:38 Octopuses
1:11:34 Flame scallop
GASTROPODS
1:12:03 Sea snails
1:14:37 Sea slugs - nudibranchs
1:21:49 Sea slugs feeding
1:23:57 Nudibranchs mating
1:26:11 Sap-sucking slug
1:26:59 Headshield slugs
1:27:49 Sea hares
1:30:21 Polyclad flatworm
1:31:18 End credits

The Leftvent - Linophryne lucifer

Leftvents are deep-sea anglerfish, who have the symbiotic bacteria and obligate parasitic males common to many of the other anglerfish.

The genus name Linophryne is Greek, and means “toad that fishes with a net”, and lucifer means, well, “Lucifer”. It’s a devil-toad-fish with a net. The whole genus is sometimes called “netdevils”. They’re uncommon enough thatbasically the entire genus is known by that common name.

Proceedings of the General Meetings for Scientific Business of the Zoological Society of London. 1886.

Gopher Rockfish (Sebastes carnatus)

Also known as the gopher seapearch, the gopher rockfish is a species of of rockfish (Sebastidae)  which occurs along the Pacific coast of North America, ranging from Oregon south to southern Baja California. Gopher rockfish can typically be found in the intertidal zone, but can be seen at deeper depths as well. They are primarily nocturnal, feeding on a range of benthic invertebrates, and occasionally fish and cephalopods.

Classification

Animalia-Chordata-Actinoptergyii-Scorpaeniformes-Sebastidae-Sebastes-S. carnatus

Image: Tom Murphy VII