bennysbookclub

The Benny's Book Club Reading List
The list so far, please feel free to suggest more!

Atonement - Ian McEwan

Catcher in the Rye - JD Salinger

Frankenstein - Mary Shelley

Guernica - Dave Boling

The Hobbit - JRR Tolkien

Kavalier and Clay - Michael Chabon

Love in a Cold Climate / The Pursuit of Love - Nancy Mitford

Mr Toppit - Charles Elton

Murder is Easy - Agatha Christie

Mystery Man - Colin Bateman

New York Trilogy - Paul Auster

The Other Boleyn Girl - Phillipa Gregory

Parade’s End - Ford Madox Ford

The Resurrectionist - James Bradley

Saturday - Ian McEwan

Sherlock Holmes collection - Arthur Conan Doyle

Small Island - Andrea Levy

Stuart: A Life Backwards - Alexander Masters

Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy - John Le Carre

Tipping the Velvet - Sarah Waters

To the Ends of the Earth - William Golding

Twelve Years a Slave - Solomon Northrup

War Horse - Michael Morpurgo

The list as it currently stands, for anybody who missed it before. October’s book of the month is Saturday if anyone who wants to join us in reading it! Audiobook, play and poetry lists are also up on our blog :) 

Radio plays are here!

First of all a big welcome all of our lovely new followers, and thank you to all of our fantastic old followers for sticking with with us - you really are such a lovely bunch.

Hayley and I have been working hard on the blog this week. There are now audiobooks, plays and poetry master lists as well as the original reading lists. They’re still very much works in progress, so if you spot anything that we’ve missed please let us know, and expect more links soon.

In the meantime here’s a list of all of the radio plays we could find that Benedict has been in, complete with audiolinks to get your ‘Saturday through Monday’ off to a good start :)


The Radio Plays

Click on titles for audio links (some complete, some extracts)

Chatterton - The Allington Solution - Peter Ackroyd

The Cocktail Party- T.S. Eliot

Kepler

The Odyssey-Homer

The Pillow Book - Robert Forrest

The Raj Quartet - Paul Scott

The Recruiting Officer - George Farquhar

Rumpole and the Eternal Triangle- John Mortimer

Rumpole and the Explosive Evidence - John Mortimer

Rumpole and The Family Pride - John Mortimer

Rumpole and The Man of God- John Mortimer

Rumpole and The Penge Bungalow Murders- John Mortimer

Spellbound - Francis Beeding

Tom and Viv - Michael Hastings

Our eternal gratitude as always to Lornasp, without whom there would be an awful lot fewer links!

Hayley - Thanks for all your awesome detective work Kate. I just need to find the time to listen to all of them! And also excellent ‘Saturday through Monday’ usage!

4

Mystery Man - my book recommendation for this month, and our December book.

After a slow start I loved this book, but don’t take my word for it, this is what Benedict had to say about it when he reviewed it for Richard and Judy:

‘This book is mad, hilarious, a whirlwind of craziness and invention.’ 'Its exciting, exhilarating, fantastically inventive and funny all the way through. I can’t recommend it highly enough.’

And there are lots of Sherlock references all the way through, my favourite being the narrator’s recruitment of the local hoodies as the 'Botanic Avenue Irregulars,’ which I’m sure that Benedict would also have enjoyed. The slow realisation as the book progresses that the narrator is incredibly complex and has a number of issues of his own is also beautifully portrayed.

Read it - you won’t regret it. This is one of my favourite books on the list so far.

The Benedict Cumberbatch Reading List


Reading list so far - and please suggest others 

To the Ends of the Earth - William Golding

Stuart a Life Backwards - Alexander Masters

Parades End - Ford Madox Brown

Kavalier and Clay - Michael Chabon

Sherlock Holmes collection - Arthur Conan Doyle

Twelve Years a Slave - Solomon Northrup

Catcher in the Rye - JD Salinger

Frankenstein - Mary Shelley

Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy - John Le Carre

Tipping the Velvet - Sarah Waters

The Other Boleyn Girl - Phillipa Gregory

Atonement - Ian McEwan

Small Island - Andrea Levy

The Hobbit - JR Tolkien

War Horse - Michael Morpurgo

The Resurrectionist - James Bradley

Guernica - Dave Boling

Mystery Man - Colin Bateman

Mr Toppit - Charles Elton

New York Trilogy - Paul Auster

For smythngred - couldn’t reblog old one, sorry. I’m up to 12.17 (half of the Sherlock Holmes and 2/3 of To the Ends of the Earth!

If you let me know what you’re reading I’m happy to read it with you and compare notes. Anybody else want to join us?? 

Watch on bennysbookclub.tumblr.com

And Part 2

(by romangirl88)

World Cat

Just wanted to post a link to WorldCat, just in case it’s a helpful link for any of you guys. It’ll let you know if a book we are reading is in a library near you (you can also search for DVDs, CDs and Articles). Works for the whole of the world so it shouldn’t matter where you are you can use it.

The general link is www.worldcat.org

and this is the specific link to Saturday by Ian McEwan, which is our next book.

Hope this is helpful to some people. I can’t always afford to buy all the books so I get most of them from my library, and you should all go support your local libraries anyway. Haha. (I’m a librarian, I have to say this!)

chaosblue-deactivated20121102  asked:

Hello, have you read all of Parade's End? I thought I heard somewhere that Chris has sex with Sylvia again after he goes back to war. I'm just thinking that at least among fandom which seems to think that Sylvia's infidelity just means she and Chris's love each other more than mere mortals do they'll never buy that Chris and Valentine matter at all. which is what most people will think because that's the way they write tv these days. you sleep around you love the one you cheat on the mostest.

Yes I’ve read them all - more than once. I’m more than a little fixated on the books, can you tell??

At the beginning of No More Parades, Sylvia goes to France and tries to seduce Christopher. Its never clear if she succeeds, but certainly when Perowne comes to her room she is naked and CT is there, so you can draw your own conclusions from that. Before that it is made very clear that they haven’t slept together since she came back from being unfaithful, and she finds this infuriating.

I agree - the way it comes across in the series there is way too much chemistry between Sylvia and CT to ever believe that he would want anyone else. In the book Sylvia is actually much more evil and twisted - her main purpose in life is basically to inflict as much pain on Christopher as possible. A brilliant as Rebecca Hall is, I think she almost makes Sylvia too likeable - it makes it hard to make sense of the rest..

Watch on bennysbookclub.tumblr.com

The World of Parade’s End (Part 1 of 2) (by romangirl88)

Apart from the obvious attraction, this documentary is full of really interesting reflections on the books.

Well worth a watch if you haven’t already.

A Blagger's Guide To: Parade's End by Ford Madox Ford Britain's 'greatest modern war novel' gets a makeover

The Independent - August 26th 2012

The BBC2 adaptation of Ford Madox Ford’s First World War classic Parade’s End began on Friday, with a screenplay by Tom Stoppard, starring poor old typecast Benedict Cumberbatch as “the last Tory” Christopher Tietjens, and Rebecca Hall as his wife Sylvia, with parts for actors including Rupert Everett, Miranda Richardson and Anne-Marie Duff. Ford’s four-part series, published from 1924 to 1928, has become a five-parter on the BBC, broadcast every Friday evening until 21 September.

Fans who are inspired to read Ford’s original novels are spoilt for choice. BBC Books has published a film tie-in edition, with Cumberbatch’s lovely face on the cover; Vintage Classics brings out a handsome version on 6 September; Penguin reissued its Modern Classics edition, with an introduction by Julian Barnes, earlier this month; Carcanet publishes all of Ford’s work, including a definitive critical edition of Parade’s End in four volumes:Some Do Not, No More ParadesA Man Could Stand Up and Last Post, as well as a one-volume version; and the Everyman’s Library Classics collection includes Parade’s End printed on cream wove, acid-free paper with full cloth sewn bindings, and an introduction from Sir Malcolm Bradbury.

Ford joined the Welch Regiment in 1915 (aged 41), partly in an attempt to evade his then-girlfriend Violet Hunt – one of several “Mrs Fords” with whom he had relationships after the first Mrs Ford refused to divorce him. He was sent to France in 1916, where he was wounded while working behind the lines as a transport officer and was invalided home. He returned to live in France in 1922, where he started work on the Parade’s End tetralogy.

Ford was born Ford Hermann Hueffer in 1873, the grandson of the English painter Ford Madox Brown and the son of the German music critic Dr Francis Hueffer. He published his first story, “The Brown Owl”, aged 18, and by his twenties he was collaborating with Joseph Conrad on novels including Heart of Darkness and Nostromo.

In his introduction to the Everyman’s Library edition, Sir Malcom Bradbury calls Parade’s End“quite surely the greatest modern war novel from a British writer”. He’s not the first writer to think so. Graham Greene said of him: “There is no novelist of this century more likely to live than Ford Madox Ford.”

Not everybody thought as well of him, however. Through his editorship of The English Review, Ford supported many writers, including Wyndham Lewis, Ezra Pound, DH Lawrence and Rebecca West – but not all were obviously grateful. Lewis described him as “a flabby lemon and pink giant, who hung his mouth open as though he were an animal at the Zoo inviting buns – especially when ladies were present”. West recalled that he was “stout, gangling, albinoish”, and that being embraced by him was like being “the toast under a poached egg”. Ernest Hemingway, in his memoir A Moveable Feast, called him a “heavy, wheezing, ignoble presence”. And Jean Rhys portrayed him as an elderly lover in her novel Quartet, but then she was one of the many women he escaped so she may have had her reasons.

Ford died in June 1939 in Deauville, France, and ended up buried in the wrong grave. A sympathetic account of his life, and an argument for his worth as a literary giant, can be found in Alan Judd’s 1990 biography, Ford Madox Ford, publisher by Faber & Faber (£18).

Benedict on books

Benedict on his favourite books - that will give us a few to be getting on with!

From the Londontheatre.co.uk interview - Questions & Answers with Benedict Cumberbatch, thanks to curlyandtwitch for the link.


What was the last book you read, and name some of your favourite authors?
Michael Darlow’s terrific biography of Terence Rattigan. Nabakov, Dostoyevsky, Dickens, Paul Auster, William Boyd, Ian McEwan, Martin Amis, Julian Barnes, Nancy Mitford, AS Byatt, Beryl Bainbridge, Hilary Mantel, Andrea Levy… Must get on and read more of them!!!

You and us both Benedict. Paul Auster. Hmmmm. That means I might have to get over my ex-boyfriend related phobia of him and give him another go.

Watch on bennysbookclub.tumblr.com

Benedict’s reviews of Guernica, Mystery Man and Mr Toppit for Richard and Judy. If that doesn’t inspire you to read them them nothing will.

Also very cute Benedict and Olivia footage.