bells line

Emotional Wreckage, One Line at a Time™
  • “Rubbish. We become rubbish.”
  • “Look. Look at me. Come wake me up. For still here I be.”
  • “I’ll never leave you again.”
  • “Can anybody be happy if they aren’t free?”
  • “There’s a beast running wild no question. But I fear the wrong monster’s released.”
  • “Because he loves her.”
  • “Let’s go home.”
  • “We’re together now, its going to be fine.”
  • “So much for true love.”
  • “Lumière, my friend. It was an honour to serve with you.”
  • “I set her free. I’m sorry I couldn’t do the same for all of you.”
  • “The outside world has no place for a creature like me.”
  • “Come back! Please don’t leave me. I love you.”
  • “It’s foolish I suppose, that a creature like me might one day earn your affection.”
  • “I can feel a change in me. I’m stronger now but still not free.”
  • “It’s as if I’m seeing it for the first time.”
  • “I am not a beast!”
  • “Easy to remember, harder to move on. Knowing the Paris of my childhood is gone.”
  • “It’s dangerous” // “Yes it is.”
  • “Keep it with you, then you’ll always have a way to look back at me.”
  • “He’s not a monster Gaston, you are!”
  • “Why are we not human?” // “Because she doesn’t love him.”
  • “When the master lost his mother and his cruel father took that sweet lad and twisted him up to be just like him… We did nothing.”

Finally, Evermore in its entirety, but especially:

She will still torment me, calm me, hurt me, move me, come what may. Wasting in my lonely tower. Waiting by an open door. I’ll fool myself, she’ll walk right in. And be with me forevermore.

2

So it’s been five years to the day since I started my historical (or, well, historical-ish) Disney princesses series.  I have no idea how it’s been this long – I feel like I drew some of these yesterday – but it seemed as good an opportunity as any to revisit Belle now that I’m five years older and wiser.  And now that I’m way more into the 1780’s/90’s.

I drew that original Belle on a whim, fueled by my sister’s time working as a costumed interpreter at Colonial Williamsburg, and assuming it would be a one-off piece.  In the long run, despite all their now egregious flaws, I owe this series for some pretty cool jobs, meeting a ton of cool people, developing an unexpectedly voracious appetite for historical fashion, and eating a fair amount of humble pie along the way.

I think this Belle probably marks the swan song of my historical Disney princess series.  Much as I’d love to continue doing it forever, I’ve got a lot of exciting personal projects that I’m ready to dedicate more of my precious free time to. I’ll probably continue designing this stuff in my off hours – who am I to resist drawing the likes of Slue Foot Sue and Katrina Von Tassel – but I’m going to focus less on polished illustrations, and more on the research and design.  When you get right down to it, that’s the aspect of this stuff that I love. :)

Thanks to everyone who stuck with me over the past five years, and here’s to way more historical fashion in the years to come  I can’t even put into words how lovely y’all’ve been. 

Just a little change. Small, to say the least.

-C

Here’s another Beauty and the Beast concept painting I did! This knocks out two designs in one piece: Belle’s gold dress and the Beast in his human form. In the words of Glen Keane through Belle in a cut line, ‘Do you think you could grow a beard?’ I’m one of the people who wishes that the Beast remained in his non-human form, so I tried to keep some of his more “animal” features in this design (mainly those furrowed brows). Belle’s gown is perfect in the original film and if it isn’t Baroque, don’t fix it, so I tried to remain faithful to the original design. I imagined it being made of a more diaphanous fabric than the fabric in the animation, though. The overall style of this one is based on Gainsborough who to my understanding was one of the inspirations for the original film.

Auntie Bells

by reddit user Pippinacious

Auntie Bells wasn’t really my auntie, or anyone else’s for that matter. I’m not sure she even had any real family at all. It was just what everyone called her. She’d been a fixture in the neighborhood since long before I was born and there wasn’t a single person who didn’t at least know of her.

She was something of a living legend; a crazy cat lady type without the cats. It wasn’t unusual to look out your window in the dead of night and see Auntie Bells shuffling down the street, big walking stick clutched in one hand, her tameless hair shining white in the moonlight. And if you didn’t see her, you’d hear her. Auntie Bells took her name from the bracelets she wore on both wrists, strands of twine run through a countless number of tiny bells that tinkled with her every movement.

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