begining middle end

The Zodiac Signs’ Most Common Writing Problems

Procrastination: Taurus, Leo 

Thinking of different unrelated scenes with no idea how to put them together: Aries, Sagittarius, Capricorn, Aquarius

Making Mary Sues: Cancer, Virgo, Pisces

Knowing the beginning and end of your story, but not the middle: Gemini, Libra, Scorpio

New ask game for writers

1. Favorite place to write.
2. Favorite part of writing.
3. Least favorite part of writing.
4. Do you have writing habits or rituals?
5. Books or authors that influenced your style the most.
6. Favorite character you ever created.
7. Favorite author.
8. Favorite trope to write.
9. Least favorite trope to write.
10. Pick a writer to co-write a book with and tell us what you’d write about.
11. Describe your writing process from scratch to finish.
12. How do you deal with self-doubts?
13. How do you deal with writers block?
14. What’s the most research you ever put into a book?
15. Where does your inspiration come from?
16. Where do you take your motivation from?
17. On avarage, how much writing do you get done in a day?
18. What’s your revision or rewriting process like?
19. First line of a WIP you’re working on.
20. Post a snippet of a WIP you’re working on.
21. Post the last sentence you wrote in one of your WIP’s.
22. How many drafts do you need until you’re satisfied and a project is ultimately done for you?
23. Single or multi POV, and why?
24. Poetry or prose, and why?
25. Linear or non-linear, and why?
26. Standalone or series, and why?
27. Do you share rough drafts or do you wait until it’s all polished? 28. And who do you share them with?
29. Who do you write for?
30. Favorite line you’ve ever written.
31. Hardest character to write.
32. Easiest character to write.
33. Do you listen to music when you’re writing?
34. Handwritten notes or typed notes?
35. Tell some backstory details about one of your characters in your story ________.
36. A spoiler for story _________.
37. Most inspirational quote you’ve ever read or heard that’s still important to you.
38. Have you shared your outline of your story ________ with someone? If so, what did they think of it?
39. Do you base your characters of real people or not? If so, tell us about one.
40. Original Fiction or Fanfiction, and why?
41. How many stories do you work on at one time?
42. How do you figure out your characters looks, personality, etc.
43. Are you an avid reader?
44. Best piece of feedback you’ve ever gotten.
45. Worst piece of feedback you’ve ever gotten.
46. What would your story _______ look like as a tv show or movie? 47. Do you start with characters or plot when working on a new story?
48. Favorite genre to write in.
49. What do you find the hardest to write in a story, the beginning, the middle or the end?
50. Weirdest story idea you’ve ever had.
51. Describe the aesthetic of your story _______ in 5 sentences or words.
52. How did writing change you?
53. What does writing mean to you?
54. Any writing advice you want to share?

Paris Hilton’s entire career was a performance art piece that all at once defined, critiqued and predicted modern culture. Whether by design or not, her work set the template for: -The downfall and comeback of Britney Spears -The spread of social media -The meteoric rise of High School Musical -The selfie -Lady Gaga’s first two album cycles -Meme culture -The Cubs winning the World Series -KPop -Silicon Valley -The Kardashians’ very existence -The Trump Administration -Globalism -Blue Ivy Carter -The Marvel Cinematic Universe …the list goes on. Whether you like it or not, Paris Hilton is the beginning, middle and end of everything you know about culture. That’s hot.

Originally posted by jadiore

Have you ever wondered why highlighters come in packages of 4 or 5?

That’s because there’s a universal technique of reading comprehension, synthesis, analysis and abstracting.

  1. Use the first color to highlight the titles and the second color for the subtitles so you start giving structure and organization to the text.
  2. Use the third color for the unknown words, then you can write down the meaning.
  3. The fourth color is for the main idea, which can be at the beginning, middle or end of each paragraph.
  4. Finally, use the fifth color to highlight supporting ideas and interesting facts.

If you do this you won’t have to read the whole text while studying and it just makes it easier to understand.

Something I also do while highlighting texts is writing a two to five words summary right to each paragraph, it makes it easier to cram or study quicker.

Hope this helped! xo

anonymous asked:

explain homestuck

one day a CS major with some photoshop skills decided he wanted to make a silly user-submitted command comic about some asshole kid walking around his house, which would explode into some Plot Shit, generally following the model of a previous work, Problem Sleuth (which ran for a year and concluded itself cleanly, i.e., had an actual Beginning, Middle, and End)

anyway, then The Internet Teens picked it up and suddenly this guy’s audience was no longer CS nerds looking for shitty CS jokes and ridiculous plot shit, but teens looking for Feels and Gays

anyway the two things got combined and seven years and 7,958 pages later with probably approaching close to an hour of animation and ~4-5 hours of flash games spread throughout, we are left with an animation reflecting on just how many times the same characters have fucking died.

it was supposed to consist of seven acts.

the following is the current act structure:

  1. Act 1
  2. Act 2
  3. Act 3
  4. Intermission 1
  5. Act 4
  6. Act 5 Act 1
  7. Act 5 Act 2
  8. EOA5 (once upon a time, people thought this 13-minute animation was the climax)
  9. Intermission 2
  10. Act 6 Act 1
  11. Act 6 Intermission 1
  12. Act 6 Act 2
  13. Act 6 Intermission 2
  14. Act 6 Act 3
  15. Act 6 Intermission 3
  16. Act 6 Act 4
  17. Act 6 Intermission 4
  18. Act 6 Act 5 Act 1
  19. Act 6 Act 5 Act 2
  20. Act 6 Act 5 Act 1: Again
  21. Act 6 Intermission 5
  22. Act 6 Intermission 5 Intermission 1
  23. Act 6 Intermission 5 Intermission 2
  24. Act 6 Intermission 5 INTERFISHIN
  25. Act 6 Intermission 5 Intermission 3
  26. Act 6 Intermission 5 Intermission 4
  27. Act 6 Intermission 5 Intermission 5
  28. Act 6 Intermission 5 Intermission 6
  29. Act 6 Act 6 Act 1: Homosuck
  30. Act 6 Act 6 Intermission 1
  31. Act 6 Act 6 Act 2
  32. Act 6 Act 6 Intermission 2
  33. Act 6 Act 6 Act 3: GAME OVER
  34. Act 6 Act 6 Intermission 3 (psyche the ride never ends)
  35. Act 6 Act 6 Act 4
  36. Act 6 Act 6 Intermission 4
  37. Act 6 Act 6 Act 5
  38. Act 6 Act 6 Intermission 5

essentially, all you need to know about homestuck is this: if someone tells you it’s a cohesive unit they’re lying, and if someone tells you it’s ending, they’re also lying

I saw Guardians of the Galaxy 2 again today and noticed a bunch more things on the rewatch.

  • First of all I was expecting to be bored at least some of the time (I mean, I just saw it a little over a week ago), but I never, ever was, not even once. This movie uses every minute so well. (Unlike the first one, where most of the Ronon and Thanos scenes dragged horribly even the first time, and were completely skippable on a rewatch.)
  • I love how the end of the movie recontextualizes some of the earlier scenes. For example, Mantis’s misery and fear is so obvious when she first meets the gang, and in most of her scenes afterwards. The first time you watch it, her anxiety is easily read as nervousness around strangers. The second time, though, it’s such a gut-punch to see her standing behind Ego, wringing her hands, and knowing why.
  • Drax mistaking Yondu for Peter’s actual father is another of those fantastically recontextualized scenes. The first time, it’s funny, just a tossed-off joke. The second time, though … right in the feels. Because Drax, for the most part, doesn’t get the whole concept of people pretending to be something other than what they are. He watches Yondu and Peter interact with each other and he totally gets the actual relationship in a way even they don’t.
  • Speaking of which, there is some really brilliant editing in this movie. This time around, I noticed how it cut from Ego’s “I’m your dad, Peter” right to the first installment of Yondu’s storyline (which also involved interacting with his parental stand-in, Stakar). And none of the significance of this is clear if you don’t know the characters’ emotional context! You basically can only pick it up after having seen the movie once.  
  • The pacing on all the emotional arcs is so, so good. I didn’t even really notice, the first time around, how strong the Peter-Rocket arc is, from their fighting in the beginning, through Rocket not wanting to leave him on the planet, to their little moment of connection at the end.
  • I still can’t get over how this movie has eight major characters (not counting Ego; let’s not count Ego) and every single one of them has a) an emotional arc of their own, b) at least one strong platonic relationship arc with a beginning, middle, and end, and c) at least one scene in which they get to be awesome and do something important. EVERY SINGLE ONE OF THEM. Even the noncombatants. Even the baby!
  • The first time around, I didn’t really notice how brutal Gamora and Nebula’s fight is. @sheronm pointed out how incredibly OTT Gamora picking up the ship cannon is (in a way female characters rarely get to be) but the whole fight is like that: brutal, dirty, vicious, and not sexualized in the slightest. Speaking of which …
  • The only shirtless scenes in the whole movie are guys (Peter on the ship, and Yondu at the brothel). The closest the movie comes to a romance arc is Peter and Gamora flirting and dancing. I still adore how Mantis and Drax make it explicitly clear that they aren’t into each other in a sexual/romantic way, and yet the most important relationship either of them has in the movie is with each other, and he’s willing to die to save her in the end. The movie doesn’t completely ignore romantic love (the Peter/Gamora relationship is still important), and it is true that there are a few sexist jokes (like Peter hitting on the Sovereign queen – though he apologizes for it, which is a rare thing). But overwhelmingly, this is a movie that never dismisses its female characters to “love interest” or sexualizes them any more than the male characters are.
  • When I saw this movie the first time, I thought the soundtrack and use of music was better in the first movie, but now that I’ve seen them both back to back, I was so, so wrong. They both have great music, they both have some great musical scenes, but I think it’s mostly that the first movie has a faster, more actiony soundtrack, while the second movie has a slower, gentler, more emotional soundtrack that I didn’t fully appreciate at first. But in the first movie, the music is mostly a (well-done!) melodic accompaniment to the action, while in the second movie, the songs are very carefully fit to the scenes in which they occur – whether the important thing is the peppy/awful contrast (“Come a Little Bit Closer” over the murder montage), or the whole point is that the song is so terribly, cheesily on point (“Brandy”), or sometimes because the song fits the emotional tone of the scene in the best fanvid kind of way (“Father & Son”, or the repeated use of “The Chain” for the characters being separated and then coming all back together in Peter’s love-epiphany/Power of Friendship™ moment at the end).

It’s just sooo goooood. I really didn’t expect a bombastic, ridiculous musical comedy in space to genuinely be one of the best movies I’ve seen in ages.

✍ Finally, an ask-meme for writers! ✍
  • 01: When did you first start writing?
  • 02: What was your favorite book growing up?
  • 03: Are you an avid reader?
  • 04: Have you ever thrown a book across the room?
  • 05: Did you take writing courses in school/college?
  • 06: Have you read any writing-advice books?
  • 07: Have you ever been part of a critique group?
  • 08: What’s the best piece of feedback you’ve ever gotten?
  • 09: What’s the worst piece of feedback you’ve ever gotten?
  • 10: What’s your biggest writer pet-peeve?
  • 11: What’s your favorite book cover?
  • 12: Who is your favorite author?
  • 13: What’s your favorite writing quote?
  • 14: What’s your favorite writing blog? c;
  • 15: What would you say has inspired you the most?
  • 16: How do you feel about movies based on books?
  • 17: Would you like your books to be turned into TV shows, movies, video games, or none?
  • 18: How do you feel about love triangles?
  • 19: Do you prefer writing on a computer or longhand?
  • 20: What’s your favorite writing program?
  • 21: Do you outline?
  • 22: Do you start with characters or plot?
  • 23: What’s your favorite & least favorite part of making characters?
  • 24: What’s your favorite & least favorite part of plotting?
  • 25: What advice would you give to young writers?
  • 26: Which do you enjoy reading the most: physical, ebook, or both?
  • 27: Which is your favorite genre to write?
  • 28: Which do you find hardest: the beginning, the middle, or the end?
  • 29: Which do you find easiest: writing or editing?
  • 30: Have you ever written fan-fiction?
  • 31: Have you ever been published?
  • 32: How do you feel about friends and close relatives reading your work?
  • 33: Are you interested in having your work published?
  • 34: Describe your writing space.
  • 35: What’s your favorite time of day for writing?
  • 36: Do you listen to music when you write?
  • 37: What’s your oldest WIP?
  • 38: What’s your current WIP?
  • 39: What’s the weirdest story idea you’ve ever had?
  • 40: Which is your favorite original character, and why?
  • 41: What do you do when characters don’t follow the outline?
  • 42: Do you enjoy making your characters suffer?
  • 43: Have you ever killed a main character?
  • 44: What’s the weirdest character concept you’ve ever come up with?
  • 45: What’s your favorite character name?
  • 46: Describe your perfect writing space.
  • 47: If you could steal one character from another author and make then yours, who would it be and why?
  • 48: If you could write the next book of any series, which one would it be, and what would you make the book about?
  • 49: If you could write a collaboration with another author, who would it be and what would you write about?
  • 50: If you could live in any fictional world, which would it be?
  • My English Professor: What's your favorite book?
  • Me: The Silmarillion
  • English Professor: That's not a book, that's just a collection of Tolkien's thoughts and ideas
  • Me: Then why is it in book form
  • Me: You want to fucking fight

HEARTWOOD: Non-binary Tales of Sylvan Fantasy is the newest anthology from P&M Press.

Across time and cultures, humanity has spun tales about the forest: tales of caution, adventure, rites of passage, and discovery. Some of those stories persist as the folklore and fairy tales that delight our imaginations today, and the forest remains a symbol for facing the unknown and emerging transformed.

This anthology is for everyone who’s walked through the undergrowth, in the silence of nature, and longed for an adventure of their own to unfold. These stories of modern-day sylvan fantasy will showcase the best non-binary cartoonists of our day, guiding characters like us into the woods and back again.

Submission Period

Submissions will be open to the public from October 16th - November 13th. (A line-up of preselected creators will also be unveiled throughout this period!)

Who Can Participate

We want submissions from people who identify as nonbinary, genderqueer, agender, bigender, neutrois, twospirit, genderfluid, demigender, trans fem or trans masc, and other genders outside the “man or woman” binary. 

For team submissions, at least the writer must meet the above criteria. If two submissions are equally matched, the all non-binary team will be prioritized. Use #TeamHeartwood (Tumblr or Twitter) to find teammates!

Age Restrictions

All contributors must be 18 years or older. All content must be suitable for readers as young as 14 years old.

Specifications

  • Comics from 4 - 12 pages long
  • 6” x 9” trim size (template provided)
  • Bleed? Yes.
  • Black & White or Grayscale (no screentones please)
  • 600 dpi

Timeline

Selection Process (October 2017 - December 2017)

  • Project Announcement - 2 weeks
  • Open Submissions - 4 weeks
  • Final Selection - 2 weeks

Work Period (December 2017 - July 2018)

  • Creator Portraits - 1 week
  • Script + Thumbnails - 8 weeks
  • Pencils - 10 weeks
  • Inks - 6 weeks
  • Grayscale - 6 weeks
  • Letters - 2 weeks
  • Bios - 1 week

Kickstarter (Fall 2018)

Compensation

Contributors to our first anthology were paid $100/page plus Kickstarter bonuses. In keeping with P&M Press’ founding goal of increasing pay with each successive campaign, HEARTWOOD contributors will be compensated at $105/page plus any Kickstarter bonuses.

Contributors also receive a minimum of 10 complimentary copies of the anthology, royalties on all digital sales, and royalties on any print runs of the anthology after the first printing sells out.

Rights

Creators will cede exclusive first worldwide print and digital rights to their stories for a full calendar year from the date of publication, and non-exclusive worldwide print and digital rights in perpetuity. Ownership remains with the creators.

What We Want

  • Previously unpublished stories.
  • Forests. Jungles. Decaying structures reclaimed by nature. Trees, trees, and - oh yeah - more trees! Deep, lush settings that have character. (If you absolutely hate drawing backgrounds/characters interacting with their environment, you may want to sit this one out.)
  • At least one protagonist must be non-binary.
  • At least one non-binary protagonist must be human (they can be half magical-species-you-made-up, but their gender should not be portrayed as a “fantastical” result of that).
  • Stories set now-ish (a hard date isn’t necessary, but keep the human fashion and any tech to post-1990 and pre-2030).
  • Movement from one space to another (entering, leaving, traveling), literally and/or metaphorically.
  • Personified aspects of the natural world (e.g. whispering winds, walking plants, talking animals, etc).
  • Original fantastical creatures/beings.
  • Discovery and Understanding.
  • Tests (of will, wits, ethics, etc).
  • Person Allied With Nature.
  • A spirit of adventure!

What We DON’T Want

  • No fan works. No auto-bio. No prose. No one-off illustrations.
  • Stories that basically amount to “protagonist realizes they are non-binary and explains gender to the other characters/the reader.” Your character can come to understand their gender better by the end of the story, but there should be a plot beyond that.
  • Meet-cutes. (“Two people meet and crush at first sight, the end.”)
  • Horror: this includes horror tropes, body horror, classic horror monsters like werewolves or vampires, popular cryptids/urban legends like Slender Man or the Jersey Devil, and so on. Your story can use fear and danger as plot elements, but if instilling fear/existential dread in the reader is the overarching theme, this is the wrong anthology.
  • Tolkienian fantasy: no elves, dwarves, orcs, etc. We won’t freak out if you make something up that’s very loosely(!) inspired by any of these (unless it replicates the problematic elements of Tolkien’s work, in which case your work will not be accepted).
  • Cursing is permitted as long as words aren’t used literally (i.e. “Shit, you scared me!” as opposed to “Let’s go shit in the woods!”) and are used very sparingly when used at all. In general, we’d prefer not.
  • No porn. No references to specific sexual acts. No explicit nudity whether sexual or non-sexual (sorry, folks). “Consensual fade-to-black sex between legal adults” is fine.
  • No depictions of abuse (sexual, physical, psychological) whether pictorial or written. Characters may vaguely reference (in non-graphic language) abuse that they have suffered in the past if doing so serves the story or is integral to the character (i.e. maybe the story is about a survivor working on their agoraphobia by going on what they believe will be a brief, non-magical hike…).
  • No gore. People can get hurt, bleed, die, etc, but not in a grossly over-the-top way that fetishizes violence.
  • No slurs, no racism (not even “fantasy racism”), no misogyny, no transphobia, no ableism, no xenophobia, no white supremacist nonsense in general. (And please, no stories whose sole purpose is to teach that these things are bad.)

Ready? Here’s How To Pitch

Send us an email at powerandmagicpress@gmail.com with the subject line “Heartwood Pitch” that includes the following information/attachments:

  1. The name, pronouns, and role of everyone on your team (or just yourself for solo submissions). Give the name(s) you want used during communications with you, marketing of your contribution, and credits in the book (even if those are all different).
  2. A working title and page count for your comic (doesn’t have to be exact).
  3. A synopsis of your story, including a beginning, middle, and end. Spoil everything, but try to keep it under 500 words.
  4. Preliminary sketches associated with your pitch: character ideas, important creature designs, environment concepts (the latter is especially important if your portfolio lacks strong examples of background art), etc. These don’t need to be final or polished pieces! Just detailed enough to give us an idea.
  5. Links to any relevant publishing credits (whether you’re writing the comic, drawing it, lettering it, or doing everything yourself). Self-published works and webcomics count as credits! Choose examples that best reflect the style you intend to use for this comic. You may simply include a link to your portfolio if you have no pre-existing credits, but please note that folks with sequential storytelling examples will receive preference.
  6. Tell us about yourself, your cultural and artistic background, and why you want to be in HEARTWOOD. Short and sweet is best!

More Questions? 

Check out the FAQ. If your answer isn’t there, Ask away!

I wanted a perfect ending. Now I’ve learned, the hard way, that some poems don’t rhyme, and some stories don’t have a clear beginning, middle, and end. Life is about not knowing, having to change, taking the moment and making the best of it, without knowing what’s going to happen next.
—  Gilda Radner

Hey guys! Here’s some advice for writing that rhetorical analysis essay on the ap lang/comp exam in a few weeks:

intro paragraph: 

This should only be 3-4 sentences long. Don’t spend too much time on it! Make sure you cover the SOAPS. 

This is how I like to do it:

  • speaker, occasion, subject (1 sentence)
  • purpose (1 sentence)
  • audience (1 sentence)
  • thesis (1 sentence)

Your thesis should tell what you’re proving about the effects of the author’s techniques– it shouldn’t straight up list the techniques you’re discussing! Also, your thesis will ideally be a complex-compound sentence, which means it will have at least one dependent clause and two independent clauses. That makes your writing more sophisticated! 

Here’s an example thesis (that I wrote for an analysis of a single paragraph):

“As Martin Luther King Jr.’s ‘Letter from Birmingham Jail’ addresses the criticism of his actions and defends his methods, his twenty-third paragraph declares his complaints against the intransigence of the white moderate, defining the white moderate’s innate complacency as the single greatest obstacle in the Negro pursuit towards freedom.”

body paragraph:

There should be 2-4 body paragraphs, depending on the length of the passage. Remember: go with the flow of the text, and don’t force yourself to write exactly 3 body paragraphs. 

The paragraphs should be organized chronologically through the text, not by technique! This means sectioning the text by paragraph (1, 2, 3) or breaking it into parts (beginning/ middle/ end), depending on the format of the passage. 

My body paragraphs generally follow this structure:

  • topic sentence- briefly describe what the paragraph is about. use transition words to identify the segment of the text you’re talking about 
  • 2-3 CSAs (basically examples)
    • claim: your position on the use of a rhetorical strategy
    • support: the quote, summary, or paraphrase of the text
    • analysis: explain how the strategy enhances the meaning and purpose of the text
  • synthesis to tie together the examples and state how they work together
  • closing sentence

Limit yourself to 2 strategies per paragraph to keep your essay focused. When writing under time constraints, I tend to be able to provide 2 examples of one strategy and 1 example of a second strategy, per paragraph, but that’s not a hard and fast rule.

conclusion paragraph:

Make this short and relevant. You’ll still have one more essay to go after this!

  • restate your thesis using different wording (1 sentence)
  • call to action, reflection, or extension (2-3 sentences)- it can be any of the following:
    • ask readers to evaluate the message of the piece
    • ask readers to agree with writer’s purpose
    • ask readers to examine how message is pertinent in modern-day
    • ask readers to reflect on the appropriateness of the piece in modern-day
    • another closing idea
Legit Mini Lesson #1

What is a Chapter? - Understanding the Structure and Use of Chapters in Novels

A chapter is more than a more than a random chunk of story. The best way to think of a chapter is as a mini-story within the overall story that you are telling. A chapter is self-contained and events within a chapter tend to be linked in some way. Even if two completely separate events are shown in different scenes, there will always be an implications of those events being connected, either through time or circumstance. 

It is important to remember this as a writer because your audience certainly will not forget this fact, and may not appreciate scenes being randomly linked together within a chapter if they are not connected.

So to reiterate - a chapter has it’s own beginning, middle and end, complete with a climax. Your protagonist(s) will have a goal within that chapter, conflicts that they will have to deal with, and some sort of resolution that progresses your reader into the next chapter of your novel. 

But of course, it’s not that easy, is it? Not by a long shot. There are a lot of other things to consider, but this is a good starting point for understanding chapters and how to use them in storytelling. 

Now that we’re talking about chapters, let’s get down to the nitty-gritty of discussing the structure of chapters. 

Chapter Structure

As we already said, chapters are more than just a chunk of story. Chapters are typically made up of several smaller components - otherwise known as “scenes.” How many scenes does a chapter typically need? That’s up to you,  the story you’re trying to tell, and a number of other factors. 

If you really want a good starting point for chapter structure then 3-5 scenes works well for most writers. 

So let’s craft a chapter based on this sort of “structure.” In this chapter, my protagonist has the goal of hunting down a demon that has been terrorizing the city she protects. The plan is for her to meet the demon and to discover that he is actually a fellow vigilante. 

Okay, so that’s pretty basic. I need to come up with a lot more for that to function as a full chapter. But you can see that it works as a full chapter, as it does tell a full story. So let’s get into the scenes.

Scene 1 - Protagonist meets with her mentor to discuss the problem of the demon. She notices some odd things about the demon’s behaviors when the mentor discusses him that give her doubt.

Scene 2 - Protagonist is out on patrol and manages to catch sight of the demon. She follows him but quickly loses him.

Scene 3 - Protagonist in her daily life. She is thinking about the demon so much that he is becoming almost an obsession. She ends up discussing him with a friend of hers.

Scene 4 - Protagonist is out on patrol again. While trying to find the demon she ends up in a nasty fight with even worse monsters. The demon ends up saving her life and she realizes that he is a vigilante like herself.

In this structure we have a goal - a conflict/complication - a climax - and a story shift at the end of the chapter. This shift is important as it makes for a chapter that will keep your reader wanting to move on to the next part of the story to see what happens next. 

(Any shift in story, whether it’s a change in time, POV, or a dramatic turn of events is a good time to break for a new chapter, FYI.)

Anyway, I have a lot more to say regarding scenes, so I’ll leave this mini lesson off for now. 

For @seungchuchuweek’s Day 5 Prompt: Mythology/Folklore!

Featuring an au I’ve been working on for a while, set vaguely in a Tang dynasty-like China. Seung Gil is a Kumiho* and Phichit is a furry

*nine-tailed fox

The Dragon & the Red Wolf:

Once upon a time, there was a young queen, beautiful and beloved by her people for her just and wise rule. They called her the Red Wolf for her copper hair and fierce love of her kingdom, but not all were so enamoured by her. A rebellious faction known only as the Usurpers ransacked the capital and forced the young queen into exile. Escaping into the far reaches of the Hollowed Mountains, a young man with a mysterious past is enlisted by her guards to lead her across the border into the neighbouring country still loyal to her rule. The Dragon, they call him, for his sullen and quiet temperament and unmatched swordsmanship. The young queen, however, is not so impressed. But theirs is a love story that has no beginning, middle or end. She doesn’t know when she falls and he doesn’t know when she begins to mean more than a paycheck. It just happens like the first flakes of snow on frosted ground. Natural, beautiful and dangerous.