beer-bottle

2

Rivertowne Old Wylie’s IPA (Picked up at Bottles Packs and Growlers in Philadelphia). A 2 of 4. A really nice citrus and tropical presence in the nose - smells quite juicy. Drinks with a firm bitterness up front and fades to a relatively sweet body. As this warms there’s some nice complexity to the hop profile, but the malty sweetness is still a bit too dominant. Not bad at all, but nothing stands out above the many great similar IPAs.

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1. The meaning behind my URL

2. A picture of me

3. Why I love my bestfriend

4. Last time I cried and why

5. Piercings I have

6. Favorite Band

7. Biggest turn off(s)

8. Top 5 (insert subject)

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I edit the look of my blog whenever you edit my feelings.
10

Second Life: The Heineken WOBO Doubles as Beer Bottle and Brick

Fifty years ago, Heineken developed a revolutionary and sustainable design solution to give its beer bottles a second life: as an architectural brick. The concept arose after brewing magnate Alfred Heineken visited Curacao during a world tour of his factories in 1960. He was struck by the amount of beer bottles—many bearing his name—littering the beaches and the lack of affordable building materials for residents. In a stroke of genius (or madness), Heineken realized both problems could be solved if beer bottles could be reused as structural building components. Enlisting the help of Dutch architect N. John Habraken, Heineken created a new bottled design—dubbed the Heineken WOBO (World Bottle)—that doubled as a drinking vessel and a brick. As author and architecture critic Martin Pawley notes, the WOBO was “the first mass production container ever designed from the outset for secondary use as a building component.” The new squared off bottle was both inter-locking and self-aligning, allowing it to nestle seamlessly and snugly into adjoining “bricks.” With Habraken’s design, a 10 by 10 foot hut could be constructed with 1,000 WOBO bottles. Though a test run of 100,000 bottles was produced in 1963, the marketing department’s worries about liabilities doomed the project. The WOBO was subsequently and unceremoniously retired. Though only two official WOBO buildings remain, both on the Heineken estate in Noordwijk near Amsterdam, the concept remains a powerful and inspiring one. Indeed, the experiment is a reminder of how a major corporation might seriously take on sustainability in an innovative way.