beer cars

anonymous asked:

Hello, I'm the anon who's freaking out about being thrown into adulthood, and thank you for your previous help. 1.) How do I mamage/budget a minimum wage salary? 2.) I've never been great with any sort of organization, but would you mind teaching me about home organization and important paper organization?

Okay, so this post will be about budgeting on minimum wage, and later in the day I will also post about paper organization. Enjoy!

Budgeting on Minimum Wage

Overview

The average minimum wage in the US is $7.25/hr. Even working full time at 40 hours a week, that’s only a profit of $290 before taxes. This is not a fair living wage! You are worth way more than this amount! I strongly encourage you to start looking for another job that pays better, look for something around the $10-$15 range. 

While $7.25 is atrocious, thousands of people around the world support families on much less. If they can do it while supporting children, so can you! To live off a minimum wage budget you need to declare yourself independent. If your parents are still claiming you as a dependent YOU WILL NOT BE ABLE TO DO THIS. I also recommend that you have the highest amount possible taken out of your taxes so that you get money back from your state at the end of the year, instead of being in debt to them.

What I’ve done is come up with a budgeting plan based off some made up factors and my own personal experience.

Housing

1. City life. Forget about the city! Apartments located in cities can be three times as expensive as apartments in small towns or villages. On top of the extra expense, they’re much smaller and have less amenities included. I’d much rather live in a one bedroom apartment with a dishwasher and a conveniently located Laundromat, than a literal closet with no windows on a fifth floor walkup. Look for apartments twenty minutes to a half hour outside of your closest city. Now you have the close conveniences of a city, with none of those pesky city prices that your budget can’t handle.

2. College towns. Shop around and look at apartments by local colleges. Large colleges with have apartment complexes within walking distance of the school grounds. Landlords know that college students have less money (you might even be a college student yourself) and adjust their prices accordingly. Even apartments next to ivy league schools are priced this way, so don’t be discouraged by the institution’s “prestige”.

3. Locale. Your safety is more important than your bank account. It doesn’t matter if you live in Section 8 housing or in an affluent suburb. Some apartment complexes and neighborhoods are just safer than others. I live in a heavily populated and upper middle class suburb, and the first year I moved in, a drunk woman tried to throw a beer bottle at my car. Thankfully this is the only time this happened to me, but it made me feel unsafe in my environment. Before signing a lease, walk or drive around your prospective home’s neighborhood at night. Take in the atmosphere, and make sure it’s one where you could comfortably run to the local supermarket at 10:30pm and pick up toilet paper.

4. Roommates. Living on minimum wage requires that you find one or two roommates to help split the rent. The more the better! Get together with your more responsible friends, so at least you’re living with people whose company you enjoy. There are lots of “roommate wanted” forums and message boards for you to browse on the internet, but always bring a responsible adult with you before meeting a stranger. Please. Bring your mom if you have too.

Food

1. Low-spoon food. I created this post a few months ago which offers lots of suggestions about cooking and shopping on a budget.

2. Online recipes. Here are some of my favorite online Tumblr cookbook resources. 

3. I also regularly update my cooking on a budget tag. 

Misc Expenses

1. Gas. Shop around and find the cheapest gas in your area. Avoid gas stations next to colleges, highways, and in touristy areas. Look into getting as gas rewards card from your favorite supermarket. I get 10 cents off a gallon with Stop & Shop every time I do a big shop. 

2. Dollar store. Get to know your local dollar and bargain stores. You can buy everything from pots and pans to bed sheets there. These stores often sell bulk ramen for $1 and large cans of crushed tomatoes for 75 cents. That’s enough food for you to live off of for several days. When shopping, I make three grocery store stops to ensure that I spend the least amount possible on my pantry needs. I go Dollar Store, Stop and Shop, and then to my local organic grocery store. I’m going to make a list of things that I buy at Dollar Stores and things that I don’t buy at Dollar Stores soon!

3. Cable. We are living in the digital age- you don’t need cable television. Use Netflix or Hulu or whatever. It will save you tons of $$. 

4. Internet. As far as internet speed goes, if you’re living with roommates you will probably need a higher speed. Living by yourself, choose a lower one. Most internet companies offer large discounts to new subscribers. These typically only last a year, but will save you serious money. Make sure to take note of when this discount expires, and contact the company before it does. If you don’t, they’ll begin charging you the full amount without notice.

5. Verizon. I just want to take a moment to talk about how much I love Verizon because they have literally saved me so much money in the three years I’ve been with them. After you sign a contract with a new internet company, they charge you a bunch of ridiculous fees like “activation fees” and “installation fees”. I called Verizon and was like “I’m a poor college student, I can’t afford this” and they were like “don’t worry, we’ll waive the fee”. I signed a two year contract with them that saved me $80 on a high-speed internet bill per month (my price being only 50.99 a month). After the contract expired I call them and they put me on a month to month, keeping the price absolutely the same. TLDR- get Verizon if you can.

6. Utility. Get on a monthly budget with whatever utility company services your new apartment. Although it may seem like the cheaper option, paying the actual amount of electricity you spend per month is the more expensive. It’s also unpredictable, and a minimum wage budget won’t allow for it. See this for more info.

7. Amazon. I buy a lot of my beauty, cleaning, and cat products online. Amazon offers Prime shipping free for a year with a student email address, and then offers it at a greatly reduced price after the year. If you are a student, snap up that free deal ASAP. If it’s in your budget, I’d greatly recommend investing in Amazon Prime.

8. Saving money. It’s so important to attempt to break way from the “paycheck to paycheck” vicious cycle. Living this way does not allow for emergency expense money, and trust me, sometime soon you will need emergency expense money. Your cat might get sick or your car may die, whatever it is, it’s always smart to have at least $500 squirreled away. I’m gonna level with you, things have been tight for my budget and I haven’t been able to save anything for the past three months. But this month I will!

Example Budgets

Full Time

Working with the $7.25/hr and 40hr/week model, here’s an example budget for living on minimum wage. That’s $1,160 a month without taxes.

Housing: Let’s say you’re sharing an apartment with two close friends, the rent being $1,500 without any amenities. That rent split three ways is $500 each.

Gas I commute twenty minutes every day, and I drop about $20-$25 a week on gas. That’s $100 on gas a month.

Food: I do one big shopping a month with my boyfriend. We drop around $180 and that’s including toiletries and soap and stuff. So maybe you’ll spend about $100 a month on all your shopping needs.

Cable/internet:  Hopefully you took my advice and skipped cable. Let’s say you’re paying around $50 per month for internet. Split three ways that’s $17 each.

Laundry: Hopefully you’re not like me and are only spending around $20 on laundry per month.

Random expenses: Because there always are some. Let’s just tack on another $100.

With everything added up, you still have around $290 left before taxes! That money can go into a savings account, and after several months, you’ll have that $500 worth of emergency money saved.

Part Time

Working with the $7.25/hr and 25hr/week model, here’s an example budget for living on minimum wage. That’s $725 without taxes.

Housing: In this case, you need to look for apartments in the $800-900 range. In my area, one bedroom apartments go for around $1000, so you may need to get creative with your roommate (I don’t think you could have more than one roommate in this situation). Buy dividers to split the bedroom or studio in half! Let’s say your rent is $850 with nothing included, that’s $425 each.

Gas You’re still looking at a large gas bill per month, so it may be more inexpensive to ride a bike or use public transportation. Let’s say you use public transportation, and spend around $50 a month on that. Or maybe you and your roommate can split gas expenses and share a car?

Food: Pinch those pennies! Use some of those budget cookbooks I linked above to help you cook healthy and delicious meals for under $4 each. See if you can only spend $80 a month on groceries.

Cable/internet:  Hopefully you took my advice and skipped cable. Let’s say you’re paying around $50 per month for internet. Split two ways is $25 each.

Laundry: Hopefully you’re not like me and are only spending around $20 on laundry per month.

Random expenses: Because there always are some. Let’s just tack on another $100.

That leaves you $25 to put in your bank account, if that. This is a paycheck to paycheck situation, and you will probably need to get another source of income to feel secure. But you can still do it!

Something’s Gotta Give

Pairings: Chris Evans x Reader

Style: One-Shot

Warnings: Angst, language, smut!!!!! (NSFW, 18+!)

Word Count: 3K

Summary: You’ve been filming Infinity War over the past 8+ months and for whatever reason, you cannot stand the sight of Christopher Robert Evans. But on a cold winter’s night, stuck in a cabin for “mandatory bonding”, you and Chris work out your issues…physically. Includes cameos of our favorite super-dorks Seb, Tom, Scar & Mackie!

A/N: OK, so Chris is a bit of an ass here. But there’s always been this small little part of me that thinks he has a dark side… he can’t be fluffy and loving all the time, right? ;) I also haven’t written smut in like YEARS so please don’t come @ me just enjoy, OK? Also, dedicated to the love of my life @dolangram because she inspires me daily to be a better writer and also just a better person. ILY forever <3 Enjoy! (Gif not mine)

Originally posted by lovelynemesis

You couldn’t stand him. Literally, every single thing he did put you on edge. Every time he breathed. Every time he spoke. Every time he laughed so fucking hard he clutched his chest and threw his beautiful blonde head back, unable to breathe. And now, here you were. Stuck with him for a full 24 hours in a snowed-in cabin. What. The. Hell.

“Oh this is going to be such fun.” You hear Tom say from the corner of the room, rubbing his hands together after setting his bags down on the floor. 

“Whose idea was it to do this again?” You mumbled, more to yourself than to anyone in particular.

“Cheer up, doll, it’s the last time we’ll all be together like this for a while. It’s supposed to be fun.” Your best friend grinned at you, slinging his bulky arm across your shoulders and ruffling your hair.

“Seb!” You grunt at the weight of him, shoving him off you. “Knock it off.”

Keep reading

11 strange things about living in Germany.
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Moving to another country is exciting, but challenging. Cultural differences become more visible and you have to adapt to a different way of life. 

Here are the top things I found strange about life in Germany. 

1. Bureaucracy 

I thought Mexico was very bureaucratic, until I lived in Germany. Do you need to open a bank account in Germany? Are you a foreigner? you’ll need two weeks. First you need to ask for an appointment, then submit all the paperwork and wait until every single document, number and statement comes through the mail. Registering yourself at the local office? three days minimum. Germans know this and always complain about it. On the upside: Germans are very efficient and most things will be done right the first time.

2. Nothing is open on Sundays 

In Germany most restaurants, supermarkets and stores are closed on Sundays as most people use this day to relax or be with their family. Most Cafés are open though and there are lots of parks where you can take a walk.

3. Cash only 

The first two weeks I was in Germany I had lots of problems with my bank: I could pay with my card but I couldn’t withdraw cash from the ATM’s. This wouldn’t be a problem in most countries but German businesses rarely accept cards and when they do it is usually an EC Card issued by a German bank. Credit cards are not a big thing in Germany and most stores, bars and restaurants are “cash only”. 

4. People will tell you what to do 

Germans are very forward when giving advice and they will try to make you understand that the best way to do things is "the German way". When Germans are sick they drink ginger tea, so you must also drink ginger tea. Got a zit? rub some German ointment on it. For Germans their cars, beer, technology and everything Deutsch-made is the best (and it kind of is). I got told to “cover up” twice while walking from the gym to my house wearing shorts in the Winter so be ready to get free advice when in Germany. 


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5. Don’t jaywalk 

Germans are very anal about this. Most people will wait until it is their turn to cross the street. If you cross before the Ampelmann turns green, there is a possibility you will be yelled at. It is vital for Germans to set a good example for children so people disregarding order deserves a good dose of public scolding. Just be civil and wait until it is your turn. 

6. Internet censorship 

In 2011 several foreign exchange students received fines for watching porn online ignoring Germany’s strict copyright laws. Streaming video is not always illegal, but still many youtube videos and websites are blocked and downloading illegally can get you fined with a couple hundred euros. 

7. Remembrance

German cities and towns are full of beautiful buildings and monuments honouring historic moments, great people and also victims of Nazi persecution. Signs with the names of the most famous concentration camps with a big “Remember” on top can also be found outside several train stations. Other common sights are the Stopelsteine which are small golden squares found on sidewalks with information of people killed or sent to concentration camps during WWII. 

8. Planning ahead

Germans love to plan ahead. You should have seen the face of my friend’s mom when I told her I had come from Mexico and had not yet found an apartment to live in Berlin. I ended up finding a place a week later but Germans tend to plan everything with lots of anticipation. Germans are not big on being spontaneous and feel more confortable when everything is carefully planned.

9. Beer is everywhere (and is everything) 

Germans love beer. Legal age for drinking is 16 and people can drink just about anywhere: the subway, streets and university cafeterias. It is common to see people sipping beer at 11 a.m. and on the train heading back from work. Broken bottles are a common sight on weekends and passed out people laying in their vomit inside the train becomes part of the occasional scenery after a couple of months (in Berlin). 


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10. Disinfecting food

My friend Valeria who is also Mexican and has lived in Germany for over two years now told me how she looked everywhere for fruit and vegetable disinfectant when she first arrived, but couldn’t find it. Germans don’t use it. Need to wash vegetables? fill the sink with water, throw the vegetables in and stir a little. In Mexico people usually take fruits and vegetables, place them in water and then add some drops of chlorine, iodine or other chemical to disinfect, so that was a strange thing I had to adapt to. 

11. Germans are the nicest people you’ll ever meet

I needed to end the list by saying that Germans are some of the nicest people I have met. The occasional douchebag is present, but Germans will go out of their way to explain things, show you their culture and cook for you. Germans will stuff you with their food, speak English to you when you have trouble getting your point across and buy you a beer when you need someone to talk to. Something I noticed as well is people buying extra loafs of bread for the homeless and young children helping the elderly cross streets, and most of all… Germans are fun! 

Rethinking CIS: finding a few grains of truth in a fucked up TERF story.

If a bullshit argument gets repeated over and over again, sometimes it’s worth weighing it again to find out what it is inside that argument that makes it so appealing. I’ve been thinking a long time about objections people have to the word ‘cis’. Most is just bullshit ‘blah, blah, I don’t want my privilege labelled’, ‘blah blah, I want to be able to label you as other’ etc. 

But one argument stood out: 

We’re assigned a gender too. 

Now, before we start, some common definitions of Cis:

“Cisgender means that you agree and identify with the gender you were assigned at birth.”

“Cisgender is a t type of gender identity perception, where an individuals’ experiences of their own gender agree with the sex they were assigned at birth.”

“Denoting or relating to a person whose self-identity conforms with the gender that corresponds to their biological sex.”

“If the doctor announces a baby as being a girl, and she is fine with being a girl, then she is cisgender.”

“You’re cisgender if the doctor says “it’s a boy” and you’re basically like truuuuuuuuuuuueeeeeeeeeeeeee forever”. 

Now, there is something obviously absent here: transness. The experience of being assigned a gender that does not align with your gender identity. The experience of being transgender. But there is something implied in all these definitions too: agreement (notice the word agree in 2 of them), comfort, being ‘fine with that’, the absense of trauma. That, I think, is a mistake.

See, being assigned a gender at birth is not merely a word, it’s a pretty big package deal. It comes with a set of boundaries, a set of expectations, a set of pressures, a set of dangers, a set of assumptions. If you’re assigned female at birth, it comes with a second class status, a target on your back to subject you to violence and rape, and a worth almost completely defined by what you could mean to a man. We’re not just assigned a gender identity, we’re also all assigned a gender role in a violently sexist society. 

And gender roles never fit. They’re designed not to fit. The ideal male role and the ideal female role are completely unachieable goals that we’re nonetheless pressured to meet. Sometimes, when a man loves cars and beer and the gym and doesn’t cry much, they almost feel comfortable. But on some level, they never truly fit any of us. 

So, thing number one: We’re all coercively assigned a highly restrictive and violently policed gender role that does not fit us.

But that’s not all. A little side story: In 2009 I was sterilized against my will because I am trans. It was a very traumatic experience, a violation that turned upside down every right I believed I had and told me I did not have the right to exist. 

Incidently, I also never ever ever want children and  had at several points in my pre-2009 life considered sterilization. Given enough time, I probably would have eventually chosen the procedure myself. As a result of that, I am not childless against my will and do not suffer the same grief and despair as my trans friends who wanted children and find that that option was taken from them. That is a struggle I don’t have. But that did not make my experience any less traumatizing. I don’t ‘agree’ with what’s happened to me. I’m not ‘fine with it’. It was a deeply violating nonconsentual act on my body that marked this body and this life as ‘not truly mine to control’.  

So, thing number two: Being forced to walk a road that you would have walked anyway is still nonconsentual, coercive and potentionally traumatizing. 

And finally- I lack the experience and knowledge to explain this last point in depth - quite a few trans POC have already pointed out that what our society defines as ‘man’ and ‘women’ are very specifically white gender identities. Stuck between hypersexualization and desexualization, ‘dangerous’, ‘exotic’ and ‘submissive’, men, women and genderdiverse people of colour all experience that their gender will always be viewed as deviant because it can not comfort to white womanhood or white manhood. For those at the receiving end of genocide, colonisation and westernisation, frameworks for what it means to be a man, a woman or some other gender within their own culture are almost completely inaccessable, erasured, destroyed and replaced with a white western gender binary.

So, thing number 3: Colonialism means people of colour are marked gender deviants by default while being denied to a non-colonialized understanding of their gender identity. 

Now, put all those things together and I think we need to radically rethink what it means to be cisgender. 

I don’t think we need to get rid of the word cisgender. It’s very valuable to have a word that describes not being transgender and not having to deal with specific trans experiences. 

I do think we need to get to an understanding of cis that acknowledges that assigning a gender to a person who turns out to be cis is still restrictive, colonializing, potentially traumatizing and ultimately nonconsentual.

This is not fine. This is not in agreement. This is, in fact, still violence.