beef and potatoes

8

Prospector Campground
Dillon, Colorado

Went camping this weekend, which was a great getaway from the city and it provided some much needed time with friends and the boyfriend! Meals included chips and homemade queso, turkey, cheddar, and egg paninis, and beef stew over potatoes. This weekend also included some very awkward sunburns on my legs? Apparently I don’t know how to evenly apply my sunscreen.

Each time I camp though, I am always reminded of camping gear I still need or want. Maybe that’s what I will ask my family for come Christmas!

Moral of the story: Get outside.

i need poc wizards and witches getting sick of the hogwarts food after so long. there’s only a certain amount of eggs, bacon, and toast they can have for breakfast, and roast beef and potatoes for lunch and dinner for their 7 years of schooling. after about a month of school, they’re all just where’s the goddamn rice??

i need korean witches begging the house elves for some kimchi, and indian wizards craving biryani, and mexican wizards just dreaming for some pozole.

because who can really live without their culture’s food for 7 fucking years?

Frosting and Crushes

Summary: Newt has been distant the past week, focusing only on Tina and their work. You try to strike up conversation with him at dinner, but, after many failed attempts, grow irritated and leave early. Queenie decides to take matters into her own hands.

Word Count: 2,224

Pairing: Newt x Reader

Requested by Anonymous

Requests are currently open! Feel free to send one in


You sit at the dinner table with no goal but to enjoy the meal as Queenie flutters around, stirring pots with both her hands and magic. She already denied your offer to help, so you decided to pass the time talking with her. Newt had disappeared somewhere, probably inside the case, and you had immediately decided against a walk when you glanced at the growing grey clouds outside.

Inside is warm and cozy. You’re wearing your favorite gold sweater. The heat from the cooking keeps out the bite of chilly air rattling the windows. Queenie is humming a jazzy tune you’ve never heard before, only stopping to giggle at Jacob’s red face when he bumps into her.

“I’m sorry.” He says as his face turns a shade of tomato red.

“It ain’t a problem, honey.” Queenie doesn’t break a stride. “What is it you’re making?”

You’re pretty sure she asks it for your sake, given the sounds your stomach has been making since he stuck the pastries he’d spent all afternoon making into the oven, and the smell had spread throughout the small room.

“Special strawberry turnovers.”

“What makes them so special?” You ask, raising your voice over the bubbling, clanking, and simmering sounds filling the area.

“They’re my momma’s recipe. Filled with love and one other special ingredient.”

Queenie swings by Jacob with the pot of stew in hand. “I don’t think nutmeg is very secret, honey.” Five bowls float down into their places around the table as Queenie sets the stew in the center.

“I never said –“

“You don’t have to.” She smiles at him and lifts the pot’s lid.

The rich smell wafts over the table to you. You breathe it in, closing your eyes to revel in the memories it brings back. Your mother always made beef stew with potatoes and chopped carrots for special occasions. Mentally thanking Queenie, you slide your chair back and step toward the pot, scooping the stew in until it nearly sloshes out the side. Queenie merely smiles at you and twirls around Jacob.

She resumes her humming. The turnovers mix with the scent of the stew and your mouth waters. The windows shake, generating a beat that Queenie forms her music around. Jacob’s laugh fills the warm room, and your entire world, for once, is at peace.

Your content joy only expands when Newt walks in, messy auburn hair plastered against his forehead from the rain sprinkling outside, giant, beautiful smile stretched across his face. You glance at your stew, fighting the huge smile trying to break upon your face. Queenie kicks you under the table and, when you meet her gaze, lifts an eyebrow. You give a quick nod before staring back down at your food, trying to resist beaming.

The fight becomes much easier when Tina walks in behind Newt, also covered in water, smile upon her face.

Keep reading

Rouladen mit Rotkohl, Kartoffeln und brauner Sauce. Rouladen usually consist of thinly sliced beef that is stuffed with bacon, onions, mustard, and pickles, then rolled up and cooked. Any meat can be used but the most traditional is beef and appropriately sliced meat for it can be found at butcher shops or even supermarkets. What exactly goes inside can vary between regions. The sauce contains red wine and the dish is usually served for lunch, often on Sundays, as it takes some time to make. Sides are potatoes in all forms (dumplings, mashed, regular) or Spätzle, and red cabbage (often with apples in it) or other vegetables. As in most German meat dishes, the sauce is the MOST. IMPORTANT. THING. This dish was considered a dish of the common people - today, it’s enjoyed by many as a festive or traditional meal.

INGREDIENTS: 

2 lb. brisket or rump, beef, sliced thin - 2 Tablespoons mustard - 1 - 2 gherkin (sour pickles) or 1 dill pickle - 1 onion - 2 slices bacon (about 40 grams Speck) - 1/2 Tablespoon. butter (or Butterschmalz, ghee) - 1/2 Tablespoon oil (or Butterschmalz) - 1 carrot - 1-2 stalks celery - 1/2 cup dry red wine - Bay leaf - Salt and pepper - Fresh parsley for garnish

Slice the beef across the large surface. This can be done with a slicing machine by the butcher or by hand with a very sharp knife. Lay beef out flat. Cut pickle lengthwise into strips, dice onion and bacon very fine. Spread each slice with plenty of mustard, fill one end with chopped onion, 2 slices of pickle and some diced bacon. Roll up from the filled end and tie with string, toothpicks or turkey lacers (Rouladennadeln in Germany) to keep them closed. Melt butter and oil in a saucepan or pot and brown the outside of the roulade. Meanwhile, dice the carrot and celery. Remove roulades to a plate, add “Suppengrün” or mirepoix and sauté for a few minutes, until soft. Place beef rolls back on top of the vegetables, add a half cup of red wine and a little water. Add the bay leaf, some salt (depends on how salty the bacon is) and some grinds of pepper, cover and braise over low heat for 2 hours, or until beef is tender. Remove roulades and keep warm. Puree sauce and thicken with a little cream, sour cream or “Wondra” (like Sossenbinder) flour. Season to taste with more salt and pepper as needed. Place roulades back in sauce until serving time and serve as described above.

It’s weird to think that before about 1500, no one had ever eaten beef and potatoes.

(Or spaghetti with tomato sauce.  Or chicken with corn.  Or turkey with wheat bread.  Or pork with chili.  Or rice with red beans.)

A Brief History of the Spork

The most grievous and recurrent misconception about the spork is that its name is a portmanteau of “spoon” and “fork.” Being part spoon and part fork this seems like the most obvious origin, but in fact the spork was invented by Edwin C. Sporke in New Orleans. Sporke invented the Spork in 1776, and the year is no coincidence. The story of the Spork is in fact, the story of the United States of America.

The year was 1773 and the industrial revolution was in its first decades. The colonists that would form the government of the United States were just arriving in the 13 colonies. At the age of 21, Thomas Jefferson had just been fired from his job in tech support at the University of Oxford. The only record of his duties there suggests that he mostly cleaned the old valuable globes, clocks, compasses, and the Ancient Abacus of Ankh-Ent-Ah-Baccus, where he is noted as having done a substandard job at removing abacus lint from the device. With no job and no prospects in England, Jefferson moved on up to the colonies in America, where he could begin a new life.

Jefferson came to America with only $7 to his name, and those dollars were worthless as the U.S. Treasury would not be formed for another 25 years. He arrived at the port of New Orleans, which was at the time called “Orleans-To-Be.” He had at the time no interest in politics, and applied to work at the only English-speaking establishment in the town. His days at McDonalds were unproductive. He slaughtered the cattle for beef, he peeled the potatoes for french fries, and he ground the bones for bread, which was made from bone powder before the evolution of wheat. But one important thing happened in his years at the restaurant: He met Edwin C. Sporke.

Sporke had arrived from Norway the year prior, and changed his name from Edvald Cornelius Sporkbeklagerdenfalskenorskenavnet to Edwin C. Sporke. Jefferson first saw him when he picked up his order for a Mutton McGruelbowl. Sporke sat down and, to Jefferson’s dismay, began trying to eat the liquid gruel with a fork. Curious, he brought the man a spoon and asked why he wasn’t using it instead. Sporke explained that spoons had been banned in Norway for hundreds of years owing to the infamous “Blood Spooning” of Vikings, from whom the Christian monarchy wanted to distance themselves. Jefferson encouraged Sporke to try, but he was hesitant. Finally, he agreed to eat the gruel with both at the same time, overlapping. The spork was born.

Because it could eat gruel more efficiently than a spoon or fork on their own, Raymond McDonald immediately began producing the utensil. This was done at first by having Jefferson weld spoons to forks, a job he so detested that he left for the east coast, taking the idea with him and keeping (most of) Sporke’s name attached, promising him royalties. Upon his arrival, Jefferson saw the next thing that would revolutionize the way we eat: The assembly line.

Famous entrepeneur- entrepeneuer– entreprenur—- famous businessman Henry Ford was living in New York, growing very rich with his mass constructed horse drawn carriages. Jefferson was impressed with the method, and immediately endeavored to accomplish a mass produced spork by means of his diligence, hard work, and persistence in buying slaves to do his real work for him. Among his early customers was Benjamin Franklin, who would go on to play so an integral role in the founding of the United States that well over 0.04% of Americans can tell you his role even today. Franklin loved the idea of the spork and showed it to George Washington, who could only eat gruel owing to the loss of his teeth in bad poker game in 1771. The men got along splendidly, and the rest, as they say, is history.

For Jefferson and the country at least. Records of Edwin Sporke are fewer and less revolutionary. Sporke never got any royalties. Whether Jefferson never sent them or whether they were stolen by railroad bandits en route will never be known, but as railroads only began delivering mail after 1804, most historians suspect Jefferson cheated Sporke out of his share of the profits. The only thing we now know for certain about Sporke is that he died in 1779, stabbed to death with his own invention during an argument over whether zebras were striped or spotted. Sporke not only died in the encounter, but made a fool of himself by claiming that the animals were spotted, having been tricked at a local zoo that displayed a dalmatian claimed to be the elusive African zebra.

But thankfully we now know his name, and his fate, and his integral role in the building of both the U.S.A. and the spork that bears his name. In this respect he remains far more fortunate than Muḥammad ibn Muḥammad al-Nafzawi, who invented the spork in 1211 in Tunisia and is not remembered in any European history books at all for obvious reasons.