bedroom feelings

a review of rainbow now that all my thoughts are together
  • bastards: great opening song. a++ gravelly/sorta raw vocals. i feel like this is gonna be an especially good anthem for high schoolers tbh like it's just such a nice "it's gonna be alright" message.
  • let 'em talk: 2010 kesha meets 2017 kesha. play this at the club tbh. but like....a classy club, u feel me?
  • woman: i'm a boy and this makes me wanna scream that i'm a motherfucking woman out the car window at random passerby
  • hymn: if kesha wants to start a church where they play this song i will be at every goddamn sunday mass.
  • praying: what can i say about this that hasn't already been said? i am just sO PROUD OF KESHA ROSE SEBERT
  • learn to let go: this is the ultimate upbeat anthem of recovery. the kind of thing that you dance to in your bedroom to feel better on a shitty day.
  • finding you: um???? did someone say 'sequel to past lives'??? this is just so cute y'all put it on your mixtapes and all that gay shit.
  • rainbow: no wonder this is the mf title track. the way her voice is so genuine and kind of shaky and powerful all at once. the piano. the way it swells and grows stronger just like she's gotten stronger. this is where i died the first time tbh
  • hunt you down: the "boy i'll murder you if you piss me off" anthem all the lady country singers wish they wrote
  • boogie feet: once again, a throwback to old kesha. eagles of death metal are the reason we put eagles on the list of protected animals obvi
  • boots: soundtrack for the female james bond movie we all know we want
  • old flames: DO I NEED TO SAY ANYTHING BESIDES DOLLY PARTON
  • godzilla: this shit is the cutest thing i've ever fuckin heard what the goddamn fuck
  • spaceship: i could fall asleep to her voice in this song but in the best way. what a nice, soft way to end an album. a++. 10/10
blue orchids

hanahaki & soulmate au (reposted)

pairing: jungkook | reader
genre: angst and a sprinkle of fluff
word count: 18.748
warnings: implied smut
disclaimer: I do not own the hanahaki disease concept.

I am immensely thankful for the talented people who have created art / edits for this story: x, x, x, x, x, x ♡ also, make sure to read moonlight (drabble from jimin’s pov) and home after rain (short sequel) after reading this story. enjoy!


You were eighteen years old when Jimin’s name showed up on your hand.

The day is fresh and clear in your memory: early December, the winds stronger than ever as they threatened to pierce through the windows of your room, hints of snowflake dancing in the air as the first snowfall augured an even sharper winter. There was a smile on your face that didn’t match the unrelenting coldness of the month, and even though the night was falling and the air felt icy on the tips of your fingers, there was only warmth in your chest as you went through the pictures of your phone.

Pictures of you and Jimin drinking hot chocolate, of clumsy iceskating, of funny faces that made you laugh out loud in the quietness of your bedroom. The feeling sparking in your chest could be considered somewhat dangerous— after all, you were just a girl that didn’t have any marks on her skin, a girl whose fate was yet to be decided. Something as enigmatic as love could be a treacherous thing, too risky for someone that couldn’t decide their destiny on their own.

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APRIL 3: Hayley Kiyoko (1991-)

From “Girls Like Girls,” to “Cliff’s Edge,” to “Sleepover,” Hayley Kiyoko has been giving us gay bop after gay pop, and so, we’d like to take today to celebrate the indie pop princess’s 26th birthday. Happy birthday Hayley!!

Although most of us have fallen in love with Hayley through her music career, she was also gracing our television screens long before many of us would have even thought of ourselves as girls who liked girls. Born April 3, 1991 in Los Angeles, Hayley was born to be an entertainer; her father is a comedian and an actor, while her mother is a former figure skater turned choreographer. Hayley first found herself in the spotlight at five years old when she began appearing in commercials and ad campaigns for companies like Slim Jim, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, and JC Penny’s. Throughout her acting career, Hayley has starred in films such as Scooby Doo! The Mystery Begins, Scooby Doo! Curse of the Lake Monster, and Lemonade Mouth and has also been featured in television shows The Fosters and CSI: Cyber.

Despite the lengthy acting resume, music has always been Hayley’s first love. She began taking drum lessons when she was just six years old and was producing her own drum charts by the time she was eleven. After a brief stint with the musical group The Stunners, Hayley started releasing her own music in 2013 with the debut of her first E.P., A Belle to Remember. The song “Girls Like Girls” from her second E.P. This Side of Paradise served as a public coming out party. In an interview with Paper Magazine following the release of the “Girls Like Girls” music video, Hayley had this to say:

“When we shot the music video for ‘Girls like Girls,’ I felt like I was finally telling my story for the first time. The yearning feelings I had and also the feeling of being so alone. I think that’s why people connected with the music video. Not only because they too have experienced deeply liking someone, but also the sadness and longing that comes with it. You could be around so many people, and still have the feeling of being so alone and misunderstood.”

Hayley’s refusal to play coy or to reduce her sexuality to subtext is what has garnered her the huge following of young girls she has today. There are two things you can count on when you listen to a Hayley Kiyoko record – the insatiable need to dance around your bedroom, and the eerie feeling that you yourself wrote the lyrics sometime long ago in one of your prepubescent diaries – Hayley Kiyoko is to gay girls what Taylor Swift is to straight girls, a vital and viciously loved source of validation.  

-LC