be you campaign

Phoebe Tonkin photographed by Alexandra Nataf for Matteau Swim SS17

i know that people being on their phones has become like a symbol of apathy and uncaring but so many people i know use social media to share love. like yesterday i got to watch a wedding livestreamed to everyone who couldn’t make it. i’ve seen my friend slowly learn how to cope with being a teen mom because of a massive outpouring of “mumblr” support + tips. i’ve seen my friends come out as gay, learn to cook, discover the flaws in their feminism, work for social change, make good life choices, go to amazing places, develop passions, form educated opinions, learn to love themselves. i’ve seen people post the bravest recovery posts and shy political posts and everything in between. 

and i don’t honestly care how edgy you think your art is. what you’re telling me when you draw grey people looking at a white screen is that you don’t care what happens to the other people in your life.

but i do. i care about the boy i’m in a long distance relationship with, but i also care about people i’ve never met. i’ve been following some people for three years and genuinely care about their experiences. i’m glad you’re still in touch with the people you love, even if you’re not paying attention directly to me! i get happy when you finally dump him! i’m sad when your cat gets sick! i give a shit.

i don’t think technology is taking empathy away from us. i think it’s changing it.

7

Donald Trump and his senior staffers are all using unsecured email servers. Right. Now.

If you paid any attention during the presidential campaign, you know that Donald Trump repeatedly harped on Hillary Clinton’s use of a private email server while she was Secretary of State. The controversy fueled the common “lock her up” chant at Trump’s rallies. And now something even more hypocritical and enraging about Trump’s staff information security has come to light.

2

All President Trump had to say about literal Neo-nazis literally marching through the streets with torches until they LITERALLY KILLED SOMEONE was “We condemn in the strongest possible terms this egregious display of hatred, bigotry and violence on many sides — on many sides

There aren’t many sides to this. There weren’t people on many sides committing hate crimes. There were just the hate and racism you based your whole campaign around, Donald. We see you not wanting to offend your little supporters, you flaming piece of shit

anonymous asked:

What is something the average American, with no legal or social clout, can do to help with campaigning against mass incarceration rates, and campaigning for prisoner rights?

Although it’s easy to feel like individually we might not have much clout or that one person’s opinion won’t make much difference, when ordinary people unite around a particular issue, it becomes the most powerful force in the world.  The key is to organize – when you organize people and organize resources, you get power.  It’s what has propelled major policy changes like banning the criminal history question on job and college applications, limiting the use of solitary confinement, and recent commitments to close Rikers Island.  If you are someone with no direct experience with the criminal justice system, the best thing you can do is identify groups and campaigns near you that are led by or centering people who have been locked up themselves (and their families).  Those closest to the problem are usually closest to the solution, but furthest from resources and power.  Follow their lead and join them in marching, advocating, and meeting with public officials.  Invest in them financially if you are able – while social movements often appear organic and spontaneous, it costs money to organize them.  Finally, don’t underestimate the power of social media.  While action in the streets and the offices of public officials is still the most effective way to generate change, there are plenty of ways to support those activities from a distance by participating in social media campaigns.

anonymous asked:

I wish you would write a fix where the batfam gets Jason the dog we all know he needs.

“I hope for both of your sakes that you have a goddamn good explanation for this”, Jason says slowly and with his best murderer voice, the same one that once upon a time made Gotham’s underground shake with fear.

But Nightwing only smiles at him, and Robin doesn’t even deign him with an answer.

“Hiya, Little Wing.”

“No. No hiya and no Little Wing. What the hell are you doing in my house? And what the hell is that thing?”

Damian’s eyes land on him like knives while he clutches the thing closer to his chest. Which is kinda hilarious to see, since the thing’s as big as the kid is.

“This is Grayson”, Damian announces.

Jason glares from him to Dick - who’s currently very busy trying to hide a grin - and then to the thing again. It’s ugly, and wrinkly, and covered with old scars.

“I can see the resemblance”, he deadpans. “Now get both of them and yourself out of here, brat.”

“He’s a Neapolitan Mastiff”, Damian continues.

“I don’t care.”

“We just boosted a drug ring”, Dick offers as an explanation. “He belonged to one of the dealers.”

“Dick”, Jason warns, because he’s got an idea of where this little charade is going and fuck no. “I. don’t. care.”

“Father said that we can’t have another dog”, Damian goes on like Jason had never spoken. “I’ve prepared a list of things you’ll need for his care and a temporary diet you can follow until the veterinary suggests something more adequate to his needs.”

“Damian. No”, Jason straight out refuses, looking right into the kid’s eyes in hope to make himself very clear.

“He needs a place to stay”, Damian insists anyway, because stubborn doesn’t even begin to cover that particular trait of his personality.

“No.”

He expects the kid to start screaming and throwing threats any seconds now, and he doesn’t care. He’s not going to be bullied in taking care of one of Damian’s pet. How they even dared to think to pull a stunt like this on him is beyond Jason’s comprehension, and he’s oh so ready to give them a piece of his mind about it.

But Damian doesn’t yell at him. Doesn’t swear to maim him and everyone he’s ever cared about. Instead he looks up at him and… pouts. Because yes, that’s a pout, through and through. Jason is speechless for a good thirty seconds, just staring wide-eyed at this kid pouting at him like he’d kicked him or something, and then he comes back to his senses.

Keep reading

positivity on this website

mlm positivity: you don’t exist for straight women’s fantasies, you aren’t predators, men loving men is good and wholesome, you aren’t a sinner

wlw positivity: you aren’t predatory and creepy, its okay to want to sleep with girls, nothing about you is dirty

trans/nb positivity: you aren’t “wrong” or making things up for attention, you are worthy of respect and love, you aren’t “faking” things for attention

ace/ar0 p0sitivity: you ARE queer! people DO hate you! DONT let people tell you there arent HATE CAMPAIGNS against you!!!!! you are VALID and QUEER and being reminded of your VERY REAL OPPRESSION is positivity!!! People WILL tell you you’re going to hell for not being sexually attracted to anyone!!!! Be PREPARED to get KICKED out of your HOME for being a cishet ace!!!! Your parents are going to put you in CONVERSION THERAPY for being a cishet!!!!!! People HATE you!!!! M O R E F E A R M O N G E R I N G !!!!!! uwu ur valid uwu <3 <3

Save the bees!

Honey nut cheerios is running a “save the bees” campaign. If you google it, they’ll send you wildflower seeds! Im super excited for flowers!!!

::edit::

Just a reminder, check to make sure the flowers are not an invasive species in your area! I know where I live, all the species are safe to plant, but do a quick google search and double check!

D&D: How to Use Character Arcs as a Dungeon Master

In my previous post on character arcs, I talked about how a player should determine how they want their character’s arc to begin and end. It was from a player’s perspective. But how does a DM write an adventure that will make that player’s arc happen?

First, get the information you need. Ask your players to each determine how their characters will begin the campaign and how they want them to change by the end of it. Then ask for copies of their character’s traits, flaws, ideals, and bonds. Note whether a player’s character is going to die tragically and if they are okay with that. With this information, you can give the players what I call a moral quandary, personalized for their own character’s arc. A moral quandary is giving the player two difficult options that the player must decide how their character would choose. The character should lean to one side of a moral quandary at the beginning of an adventure, but gradually start to lean the other way as their arc comes to completion. 

For instance, a cleric might be presented with a choice to kill an evildoer or merely capture them. If the cleric is heading down an arc where their ideal changes from “all life is precious” to “evil must be stopped at all costs” in their character arc is going to make very different choices in that situation depending on where they are on their arc.

Let’s figure out how we can use this info as a DM and where to put moral quandaries using a 9-point story structure. These are not an entire campaign, but you can use each point as a fixed point in the narrative; a story outline based on the characters’ arcs. Plenty of different stuff can happen between each point, but the points must happen to create a robust story.

Call to Action

The player is given an initial call to action. Essentially, a moral quandary disguised as a quest hook. Try to have a separate but related call to action for each player. Ideally, the players should refuse the call to action, as they haven’t been “changed” yet. If they play to their characters’ initial backgrounds and traits, they will refuse the call. You can even enforce this by loading your call with descriptions of how the character is feeling. “You are offended that someone would even offer something so morally reprehensible to you, despite the fact that you could use the money.”

A good-hearted rogue is starting a tragic fall arc and is offered a chance to make millions from some morally questionable actions involving an evil regime, but decides it is wrong. An innocent paladin starting a coming of age arc could be offered a chance to rise against an evil regime, but values their own safety. A studious apprentice wizard starting a corruption arc is offered power in exchange for service to an evil regime, but decides they can get power on their own.

Inciting Incident

Something happens to force the player to action, whether they are ready or not. Try to come up with an inciting incident that involves all of the players, not just one. The inciting incident can act as where the adventuring party finally meets.

The evil regime in the Call to Action ends up invading the players’ quiet suburb to enforce martial law. The players escape or fight back or else they and their loved ones die or are enslaved. The rogue decides to run from their debts by joining the party. The paladin has seen firsthand what the regime can do, and will now join the party to find someone else who can help them stop it. The wizard seeks out more power to stop the regime.

1st Plot Point

The players learn the first shreds of information about the overarching narrative of the campaign. After the inciting incident, some characters might not be convinced and want to turn back. This gives them a reason to continue onward together, as a team. There should be no turning back from the 1st plot point.

Players learn how this evil regime has been spreading across the kingdom. It still holds many mysteries, but its power is great and threatening. Its power is centered in a capital city, which the players now opt to travel to in order to find the things they currently desire.

1st Pinch Point

A pinch point is the first real display of power from the antagonist or opposing force. In D&D this should be actual combat, though it doesn’t have to be. As long as the players see firsthand what the antagonist can do to their characters, this part will add the tension/drama that it should. If you want to have a 1st Pinch Point for each character, then this display of force should directly target the player’s character arc and spark the desire to change through a moral quandary. It’s an awakening. Create tension by ending a session with this pinch point.

The players come across a thieves’ guild run by the evil regime. The rogue takes note of how rich, glamorous, and lawless the life of a criminal is to spark their tragic fall arc. The paladin realizes how deep the corruption of the world runs and sparks their coming of age arc as their innocence starts to fade. The wizard realizes how much resources the evil regime has, and wonders what sorts of power they had in mind for him sparking their corruption arc.

Midpoint

More info is revealed about the antagonist and the perception of the characters change. They have an epiphany and decide to continue onward through their arc. This can, and most likely will, happen at different times for each character and their varying arcs.

The players learn about the leader of the regime. They have been pushed to the breaking point by the regime’s forces. The rogue decides join the regime and start doing crime for the regime and acting as a double agent against the party. The paladin no longer cares about finding someone else to help them stop the regime, vowing to end it themselves. The wizard gets an unholy tome and decides to learn how to make a pact with the demon the regime mentioned to overpower the regime. They are all still heading to the capital, though now with severely divergent goals.

2nd Pinch Point

The antagonist reveals their full power and threatens the completion of the characters’ arcs. The entire party should, in general, be at their lowest moment and completely without hope. This should happen at the same time for everyone. Ideally, end a session with this pinch point to create a cliffhanger and highlight the hopelessness.

The players reach the capital of the evil regime. The rogue is faced with a moral test, where they will be offered riches and allowed to live if they rat out their adventuring party. They choose to take the offer and are betrayed by the regime’s leader and sentenced to death anyway. The paladin comes face to face with the regime’s leader after being ratted out by the rogue. They fail the encounter and barely manage to escape with their life. The wizard is also defeated and their unholy tome is destroyed in the battle. The rogue is imprisoned and the paladin and rogue escape the leader and are being hunted in the capital.

2nd Plot Point

The last piece of the puzzle has come together in the second plot point. The characters finish their arc and learn how to overcome the antagonist. This can happen at different points and doesn’t have to happen quickly. For a tragic character, this is the part where they finally meet their end. Tragic characters fail to change or their change is self-destructive and they fail to overcome the antagonist of the story (tragic, isn’t it?). Think of this part as a moral quandary that characters’ finally “know the answer” to, as far as their character arc is concerned.

The rogue tries to escape, succeeds, but heads back to the thieves’ guild instead of his adventuring allies, and they ultimately betray and kill him. The paladin’s innocence is shattered and they gather rebel forces over time to take on the regime’s leader, becoming a leader themselves. They also find an unlikely ally in the wizard, who has finally succumbed to evil. The wizard still doesn’t know how to summon the demon, but they have already gotten a taste of evil’s power by performing vile rituals on captured regime members and will now use their power for vengeance against the regime’s leader.

Climax

The characters finally face off with the antagonist. The promise set out at the beginning of the campaign is fulfilled. The characters, having completed their arcs, are now changed enough to be able to defeat the antagonist. This should be the players at their most powerful and should be the most epic battle to take place in the campaign.

The paladin’s rebel army and the wizard’s evil magic face off against the evil regime’s leader. The battle is long and epic, but the characters succeed, freeing the kingdom of the evil regime.

Resolution

The game shouldn’t abruptly end after the antagonist is defeated! There needs to be closure. The players’ characters find out the results and the aftermath of defeating the antagonist, for better or for worse. In the case of an ongoing game, you should now set up the next campaign here.

The paladin and wizard regard each other as unsteady allies who no longer have a common enemy. The wizard seeks more power, even seeking to possibly usurp the void of power left from the regime’s defeat. The paladin and their rebel army gather in defiance of the wizard. The paladin tells the wizard to leave the kingdom and not threaten anyone with their evil, else the paladin will smite them down. The wizard, not having many spells left after the battle and not being ready to face an entire army, teleports away to parts unknown with a puff of green smoke. The paladin is placed in power, and the wizard now acts as a looming threat. Perhaps an NPC and villain for the next campaign?


This character arc outline is not cut-and-dry. You should use it as a guide, not a rule. Some characters might abruptly choose to change. Some will reach different parts of the outline at different times or out of order. Some characters might waffle between two sides of their arc before deciding which side they want to be on. But the more you talk to your players about it, the easier it is to come up with a generalized plan for your campaign’s story. Heck, your story might even change from what you initially intended by the end of it (a character with a bad roll can still end up dying before even finishing their arc!) But hopefully this will aid you in making the players love their characters even more and have fun as they grow and change in your campaign’s world. That’s what it’s all about, after all.