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Berlin: Fortissimo Strikes Multi Film Deal With China’s Zhang Wei

Hong Kong- and Amsterdam-based Fortissimo Films has struck an agreement to represent a slate of pictures by Chinese producer-director Zhang Wei.

The deal includes his upcoming “The Sound of A Dream,” as well as two previous features.

Zhang’s last film, “Factory Boss” earned the best actor prize for Yao Anlian at the 2014 Montreal Film Festival. It will next play at the Berlin Chinese Film Festival (Feb. 16-23,) which overlaps with the Berlinale and as a market screening at the EFM. The deal also covers Zhang’s “Destiny.”

Zhang moved into filmmaking after a successful career in business. He now operates his own Shenzhen-based production company, Huahao Film & Media.

He is known for presenting candid visions of marginalized Chinese lives through his films. “Destiny” (“Xi He”) is the tale of an autistic boy’s struggle to get an education. “Factory Boss” is the story of an entrepreneur who desperately takes on low margin jobs to keep his business afloat.

The big-budget “Sound of a Dream” is the story of four visually impaired children from Tibet whose dream is to appear on a TV talent show.

“Zhang [has a] unique perspective on contemporary life in China to the world. His first two films reveal his award winning vision and strong sense of story, and we are looking forward to bringing these and his upcoming films to the international scene,” said Fortissimo chairman Michael J Werner.

The deal was negotiated by Fortissimo’s Werner together with Zhang, and Peter Donner of Beijing based Lightshades.

Related stories‘Batman v Superman’ To Get Day-And-Date China ReleaseMattel’s 'Thomas & Friends’ Spinoff To Get China Theatrical ReleaseESPN Scores Strategic Agreement With China’s Tencent

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The Trouble With Superman

Superman should be invincible. Since his car-smashing debut in 1938, he’s starred in at least one regular monthly comic, three blockbuster films, and four television shows. His crest is recognized across the globe, his supporting cast is legendary, and anybody even vaguely familiar with comics can recount the broad strokes of his origin. (The writer Grant Morrison accomplished it in eight words: “Doomed Planet. Desperate Scientists. Last Hope. Kindly Couple.”) He’s the first of the superheroes, a genre that’s grown into a modern mass-media juggernaut.

And yet, for a character who gains his power from the light of the sun, Superman is curiously eclipsed by other heroes. According to numbers provided by Diamond Distributors, the long-running Superman comic sold only 55,000 copies a month in 2015, down from around 70,000 in 2010—a mediocre showing even for the famously anemic comic-book market. That’s significantly less than his colleague Batman, who last year moved issues at a comparatively brisk 150,000 a month. Mass media hasn’t been much kinder: The longest-running Superman television show, 2001’s Smallville, kept him out of his iconic suit for a decade. Superman Returns recouped its budget at the box office, but proved mostly forgettable.2013’s Man of Steel drew sharp criticism from critics and audiences alike for its bleak tone and rampaging finale. Trailers for the sequel, Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, have shifted the focus (and top billing) to the Dark Knight. Worst of all, conventional wisdom puts the blame on Superman himself. He’s boring, people say; he’s unrelatable, nothing like the Marvel characters dominating the sales charts and the box office. More than anything, he seems embarrassing. Look at him. Truth? Justice? He wears his underwear on the outside.

Behold! I give you the problem of Superman. It’s a problem that has less to do with the character himself and more to with DC Comics, which found itself stuck with a flagship character it thought needed fixing. In trying, it broke him nearly beyond repair.

Recommended: Why We Still Miss Jon Stewart

* * *

The storytelling engine Joe Shuster and Jerry Siegel devised for Superman when they created him should be, like their hero, bulletproof. Clark Kent is a mild-mannered reporter hiding his secret identity from the world, including his sharp, competent coworker, who happens to be the woman of his dreams. He’s stuck in a love triangle with himself, between the man he is, and the man he wishes he could be. He’s an immigrant driven not by tragedy but by an unshakable sense of right and wrong and a desire to fix the world for the less fortunate—a battle that can never end. As the famed comics creator Alan Moore wrote:

Almost certainly by instinct rather than by psycho-social analysis, two Cleveland teenagers had crafted a near-perfect and iconic fantasy which spoke to something deeply rooted in the psyche of working America [in the early 1930s] … At his inception, Superman seems very much a representative of the downtrodden working classes his creators hailed from, and a wonderful embodiment of all the dreams and aspirations of the powerless.

This is who the character is at his best: not a walking set of superpowers, but a man fighting for truth and justice to the best of his considerable ability.

Superman was so popular in the 1940s that his comic was adapted into a smash-hit radio show, which itself proved popular enough that it helped bring down parts of the Ku Klux Klan. Before long, he was the biggest comic-book character in the world. But Siegel and Shuster, exploited and cast aside by the company whose fortunes they had made, saw barely a dime of the profits. Away from his creators and under DC’s management, Superman changed from a rabble-rousing populist into a bland icon of the establishment, cycling through the same sets of adventures every few years: a hero with nothing better to do than devise elaborate pranks to play on Lois Lane. Despite the gloriously silly super-science of Silver Age Superman, with its time-travel, transformation rays, and bottled cities, the engine rusted under the hood.

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In 1962, the competition arrived. In August of that year, the newly christened Marvel Comics, already humming with hits like The Fantastic Four, debuted Amazing Fantasy #15, the first appearance of Spider-Man. Steve Ditko and Stan Lee, his creators, had reinvented the Superman engine, taking the archetype of the superheroic outsider and making him an underdog through a series of clever tweaks. Where Clark Kent’s romantic life was a game, Peter Parker’s was a soap opera; where Clark’s boss was gruff, Peter’s was a jerk; where Kent was ignored in civilian guise, Parker was actively picked on. Marvel had, in effect, figured out how to supplant Superman. In doing so, they began selling not just to children but also to college students, and eventually to adults. It was a challenge that DC, formerly the dominant comics publisher, had to answer.

DC responded to Marvel in halting steps during the 1970s by refashioning many of its characters to be a little more quarrelsome and a little less aspirational. Some, like Batman, easily made the switch. Others, like Flash or Wonder Woman, were reinvented to varying degrees of success. But with Superman the company routinely stumbled, worried about messing up its star hero.

In 1971 DC hired Jack Kirby, the architect of Marvel Comics, but instead of assigning him the main Superman book, it put him on a spin-off, Jimmy Olsen. Even as Kirby was cranking out concepts that would become pivotal to the DC Universe, the company had other artists redrawing his Superman in the house style. It assigned the Batman writer Denny O’Neil to tell more modern Superman stories, but rolled back his changes as well. As the comics landscape shifted, Superman remained either purely superheroic or continued to lean on the endless, increasingly tired triangle of Lois, Clark, and Superman. DC had typecast its flagship character as a company man, and no amount of multicolored kryptonite or super-pets could change that.

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The character was still popular enough in the wider cultural sphere: The 1978 film Superman, starring Christopher Reeve and Margot Kidder, was a hit. But eventually DC faced facts: The comic needed fixing. In 1985, DC hired John Byrne, a writer from Marvel, as part of a massive retooling effort. The resulting series, Superman: Man of Steel, summoned a bit of the competition’s swagger, quickly reinventing and streamlining portions of Superman’s universe while keeping its fundamental cheeriness. The evil scientist Lex Luthor became a corporate raider. Bits of continuity ephemera, like Clark Kent’s early career as Superboy, were dropped.

For a while, things ran smoothly, but Superman couldn’t quite seem to shake his stodgy reputation. Despite Byrne’s reboot, the comics’ sales again flagged, rising only in the 1990s with a series of increasingly desperate stunts. DC married Clark Kent and Lois Lane. It killed Superman and brought him back. It split him into two different bodies, one red, one blue. Each event brought diminishing returns. Finally, DC decided it was time to try and give Superman a fresh start for the new millennium.

To date, it has not stopped trying.

* * *

The problem DC faced was this: You can’t fix something if you’re not sure where it’s broken. One of the issues halting a successful reinvention of Superman is a shift in the nature of the comics market. Since the 1980s, the dominant trend in the industry has been specialty comics shops replacing newsstands as primary distributors. Given this change, companies like Marvel and DC have focused their marketing toward an ever-dwindling market of adult fans, darkening their characters in an attempt to keep the interest of a readership desperate for mainstream respectability. In effect, adults were colonizing young-adult narratives and warping them in the process—an early example of what later occurred with Michael Bay’s legendarily crass Transformers films.

In one of the uglier paradoxes of the superhero-comics industry, characters who were devised to entertain children soon became completely unsuitable for them. Leaning into this trend in an effort to entice new adult readers, DC largely abandoned its strengths as a publisher of optimistic, bizarre superheroics and fumbled for an edgier identity. Aspirational characters were hit hard by this change—Wonder Woman in particular has suffered nearly as many reboots as Superman, the latest of which has cast her as the bloodthirstiest of her Justice League coworkers, her trademark lasso of truth traded for a sword.

But the trend proved particularly damaging to the Man of Steel. The 1986 Dark Knight Returns, one of the landmark wave of “mature” superhero comics, cast him as a Reaganite stooge and ended with Batman knocking him out. The choice directly shadowed Superman’s history up until the present. The dour trailers for Batman v Superman draw directly from the imagery of The Dark Knight Returns, with several shots paralleling panels from the earlier comic. The effect is to shout for everybody watching: This is a serious film. Pointedly, in these trailers Superman never once smiles.

In fact, it’s hard to escape the impression that Superman’s own company finds him a bit embarrassing. As the comics writer Chris Sims points out in his review of the anniversary compilation Superman: A Celebration of 75 Years, DC’s company line on Superman seems to be that he’s “a depressed sad sack who never wins.” The company ditched his iconic red trunks in 2011 and placed him instead in the blue, armor-like suit he currently wears on film. In response to fan complaints that Superman was “too powerful” and thus boring, it constantly adjusted his level of strength. Broader attempts to reconcile the character with its new approach have been filled with false starts and cold feet: Many of the innovative Superman runs of the past decade, including Joe Casey’s short-lived attempt to position the character as a pacifist, were either quickly rolled back or derailed by editorial interference. Promising new approaches, including a radical late ’90s pitch by the modern comics superstars Grant Morrison, Mark Millar, and Mark Waid, likewise went unexplored.

Instead, the majority of Superman stories published in recent years have either been chair-rearranging reboots or have focused on the question of his relevance. The relaunches have been particularly difficult to ignore. Since 2001 alone, DC has commissioned five different reboots of Superman’s origins in the comics: the excellent Superman: Birthright and All-Star Superman, the adequate Superman: Secret Origins, the execrable Superman: Earth One, and the ongoing (and rather good) Superman: American Alien. Mass media has gotten in on the act as well, with the show Smallville and the blockbuster Man of Steel likewise being obsessed with reinventing the character for modern America.

Questioning Superman’s place in culture isn’t an inherently bad idea, and it’s no wonder that creators want to dig into his truth-and-justice symbolism in a world that seems to hold both in short supply. However, that impulse has led into a rabbit hole of navel-gazing narratives that endlessly attempt to justify the character’s existence. In its constant attempts to “fix” Superman over the last 20 years, DC has largely forgotten to tell stories with him.  

The irony of all this is that, for all the rust and ineffectual tinkering, the storytelling engine built by Siegel and Shuster still runs. Superman remains as inspirational a character as he did during the Great Depression: Considering the current state of rampant income inequality, brutal law enforcement and corrupt politics, the immigrant superhero from the planet Krypton may be more relevant now than he has been in years. What the comic requires now is not another reboot, but a forceful, committed attempt to refine the engine that currently exists—to stop trying to make Superman something he’s not, and to focus instead on what he is. The current writer on Action Comics, Greg Pak, has leaned into this idea with stories of a more socially aware Superman. It’s a good start. But it remains to be seen whether or not DC will allow it to stick.

* * *

Who, then, is the modern Superman? Per Grant Morrison’s critically acclaimed All-Star Superman (2005), a love-letter to the Silver Age of Superman comics, Clark Kent is a man whose god-like power is his incredible empathy, juxtaposed against strange and dastardly villains—tyrant suns, Bizarro clones, the megalomaniacal Lex Luthor. He’s a journalist who fights corruption and oppression wherever he finds it, both in and out of costume, as in Mark Waid’s Superman: Birthright (2004), which retells the character’s origin with an emphasis on his relationships with the Daily Planet and the astute Lois Lane.

Perhaps most importantly, he’s a character who deeply feels his responsibilities, but still manages to be cheerful, funny, and down to earth—the defining characteristics of Kurt Busiek’s alternate-universe tale Superman: Secret Identity (2005). Secret Identity in particular is worth noting for another reason: it’s the only Superman story to graft the refinements of Stan Lee’s underdog Spider-Man back onto Superman. As a result, it’s the best Superman story of the decade and perhaps one of the best of all time.

Taken together, these stories point to a way forward for Superman that could easily recapture people’s imagination while mirroring Siegel and Shuster’s original vision: stories of a man with the powers of a god, who chooses to live as a normal person and fight for normal people. Stories that are part newsroom drama and part mind-bending superheroics, mixing in corrupt corporations and alien invaders from other dimensions. Stories that can veer into snappy romantic comedy or genuine emotion with the removal of a pair of glasses. Stories that stop trying to reboot Superman and instead refine and build on what’s already there.

In other words, if you believe in him, the man can fly.

Read more from The Atlantic:

This article was originally published on The Atlantic.

Michael Kors has identified a huge weakness in its business — and it should terrify Macy's

(Jonathan Alcorn/Reuters)
People wait in line to enter a Michael Kors store during day after Christmas sales

Michael Kors’ just identified a huge weakness in its business — American malls. 

Despite strong gains in the overall business, the handbag retailer says it saw a decline in North American mall traffic. 

And company Chairman John Idol told investors on a conference call that he only expects things to get worse. 

“We believe that mall traffic in North America is going to continue to decline,” Idol said. “And the reason for that is, is again we think that people in North America are a bit more savvy when it comes to digital shopping, and it’s just been more cultural here for a longer period of time.”

Mall traffic in Europe and Asia is stable, but that could change as more shoppers in those markets adopt e-commerce. 

Idol hits on a bigger trend in retail: a move away from physical stores that threatens malls everywhere. 

Macy’s is closing 40 stores in the beginning of this year. 

Analysts at RBC Capital Markets believe that this is part of a larger trend in retail, as more customers shop online instead of in stores. Shoppers are also increasingly unwilling to shell out for expensive apparel, deciding instead to spend their money on electronics and restaurants.

“Macy’s announced store closings could have a number of implications on the overall retail landscape,” the analysts at RBC write. “We believe Macy’s decision will catalyze other specialty retailers and department stores to take a harder look at their boxes in these underperforming centers.

Macy’s isn’t the only retailer being hit by the trend. 

Walmart’s recent decision to close stores highlights "how much the retail landscape has changed,” according to analysts at Conlumino, a New York-based research firm.

“The blunt truth is that while stores remain a vital part of the retail mix, they are not quite as relevant as they used to be,” according to Conlumino CEO Neil Saunders. “Walmart’s decision is part of a larger shift that will be played out across all parts of the retail sector over the coming year and beyond.”

NOW WATCH: It’s official: Michael Kors isn’t cool anymore



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Kendall Jenner Joins Calvin Klein's Sexy Spring Campaign -- See the Stripped-Down Pics!

Kendall Jenner just keeps getting hotter!

The 20-year-old reality TV star took to social media to announce her newest gig – modeling in Calvin Klein’s Spring 2016 global advertising campaign.

WATCH: Kendall & Kylie Jenner’s Secret Boob-Slapping Handshake

“I want to be with you in #mycalvins,” she captioned a racy Instagram video montage that includes close-up shots of her features on Tuesday. “My new Spring 2016 @calvinklein campaign… What do you do in yours?”

The post was followed up with a snap of Jenner from the campaign, in which the supermodel leans back on a stool and shows off her toned tummy while rocking a sports bra and underwear from the popular brand.

Tyrone Lebon

“I pose in #mycalvins,” she wrote on Wednesday. “What do you do in yours? Here’s my Spring 2016 @calvinklein campaign shot by Tyrone Lebon.”

PHOTOS: Justin Bieber ‘Flaunts’ His Calvin Klein Underwear in Stripped-Down Ads

In another steamy shot, the Keeping Up With the Kardashians star lays in bed in nothing but her intimates. “I dream in #mycalvins,” the text on the ad reads.

Tyrone Lebon

Flaunting her flawless abs (and cleavage!) once again, the third ad features Jenner in a matching black bra and briefs set, styled with a sparkly jacket and low-rise jeans.

Tyrone Lebon

Jenner joins a group of already announced celebrities for the campaign, including musicians Kendrick Lamar, Fetty Wap, FKA Twigs, Joey Bada$$ and Justin Bieber.

WATCH: Kendall Jenner & Gigi Hadid Twerk in Chanel Gowns in Paris

Prior to the exciting announcement, Jenner made headlines one day earlier with a video posted to Vogue magazine’s Instagram.

In the short clip, Jenner shows off her twerking skills in a beautiful designer gown outside of Chanel’s Haute Couture Spring-Summer 2016 runway show in Paris alongside her close pals, sisters Gigi and Bella Hadid. See it go down in the video below.

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Ghost In The Shell cast: Michael Pitt to star as villain opposite Scarlett Johansson

Michael Pitt (Boardwalk Empire, Hannibal) has been cast as the main villain in upcoming sci-fi movie Ghost In The Shell, a live-action thriller based the manga comics of the same name. He will star opposite Scarlett Johansson in the adaptation, which is being directed by Snow White And The Huntsman’s Rupert Sanders.

Pitt is set to play a character from the initial series called the Laughing Man. But don’t be fooled by the name! The antagonist is a nasty and vengeful human/robot hybrid who has an individual sense of style. He has been described in the past as being a ‘bad guy filtered through the lens of a street artist’.

Johansson will play the lead; a special-ops cyborg named Motoko Kusanagi, who operates under a task force called Section 9 that deals with the most dangerous criminals and extremists. Her specific mission this time? To take down a particularly vicious computer hacker.

Ari Arad, Avi Arad and Steven Paul are producing the project, while Michael Costigan, Jeffrey Silver, Tetsu Fujimura and Mitsuhisa Ishikawa are executive producing. Straight Outta Compton’s Jonathan Herman and Street King’s Jamie Moss penned the script, inspired by Masamune Shirow original stories.

Ahead of its scheduled release date on 31 March 2017, filming is expected to begin later this month on location in New Zealand.

Pilou Asbæk, who will be seen in the upcoming sixth season of Game Of Thrones, will also star in the film. It has been rumoured that Sam Riley could feature as well.

Pitt will next be seen in indie art film The Sleeping Shepherd opposite Imogen Poots, Criminal, a thriller that also features Ryan Reynolds, Kevin Costner, Gal Gadot and Gary Oldman. Johansson is soon to appear in cinemas in Joel and Ethan’s epic comedy Hail, Caesar! alongside a star-studded cast that includes Ralph Fiennes, Josh Brolin, Channing Tatum and George Clooney.

For more entertainment news follow A-List on Twitter @Alistinsider

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Why the strategy the Broncos used to clobber Tom Brady may be useless against Cam Newton

(Doug Pensinger/Getty)
The Broncos’ defense will have to adjust to the Panthers’ run game.

In the AFC Championship, the Denver Broncos defense clobbered Tom Brady, sacking him four times, hitting him 20 times, and forcing him into two interceptions.

In a 20-18 win, it was the Broncos’ impressive defense that ultimately got them to the Super Bowl.

However, against the Panthers, the Broncos face a very different opponent, and their plan of attack against Tom Brady and the Patriots may be moot for one big reason.

The Panthers can run the ball.

As ESPN’s Bill Barnwell wrote after the AFC Championship, the Broncos didn’t respect the Patriots ability to run the ball whatsoever. Brady has never been a runner, and the Patriots were without Dion Lewis and LeGarrette Blount, their two starting running backs. The Patriots’ backup running backs combined for just 31 yards two weeks ago.

Instead, the Broncos didn’t blitz the Patriots, sending only three- and four-man rushes at Brady while dropping everyone else into coverage for the Patriots pass-heavy attack.

Cam Newton and the Panthers present a totally different challenge because of their ability to run the ball. According to Football Outsiders, the Panthers had the sixth-best running offense in the NFL, led by Jonathan Stewart’s 989 yards and Newton’s 636 yards.

Unlike Brady, Newton isn’t afraid to leave the pocket, and if the Broncos were to use the same game plan against him, they’d suddenly be scrambling to get defenders to bring down Newton. Similarly, the Broncos have to account for Stewart. Dropping seven into coverage while sending four linemen at Newton could leave a dangerous hole for Carolina to exploit.

The combination of Von Miller and DeMarcus Ware will present problems for Carolina’s offensive line, but both players can’t simply attack Newton like they did with Brady. Carolina has the pieces to exploit an over-aggressive pass rush, which means Miller and Ware will have to play it more steadily. Barnwell suggests in his Super Bowl prediction column that the Panthers may have to rush from the edge while using a linebacker as a spy or to fill that edge rusher’s hole.

And while the matchup may not be ideal, the Broncos were the NFL’s best defense by a wide margin this season. Defensive coordinator Wade Phillips is considered one of the best in the NFL and surely has something different up his sleeves.

Denver will have its hands full with this Panthers offense, and it would be unwise to go after Newton with the same intensity they attacked Brady.

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Video Of The Day: Rekha Hugs Jaya Bachchan As Amitabh Bachchan Wins The Award!

Watch: Rekha Cheers For Amitabh Bachchan In The Most Adorable Way!

Bollywood’s two veteran actresses Jaya Bachchan and Rekha who not very often talk or cross their paths due to their past equations, were clicked hugging each other at the recently held awards event. Midst all sorts of fun and power packed performances by Bollywood stars at the awards event, the glitzy night saw a moment that left everyone speechless.

Earlier, we got adorable pictures of two talking, hugging and greeting each other and now we have got a video of them sharing a very adorable moment. The moment when Rekha went and hugged Jaya Bachchan, everyone at the event was surprised and shocked.

It was even more surprising for everyone as Rekha hugged Jaya Bachchan, the moment when it was announced that Amitabh Bachchan has been bestowed with Best Actor award for ‘Piku ‘along with Ranveer Singh, who won for ‘Bajirao Mastani’.

One can see in the video from the awards show, which was aired last night on the television, the two veteran actresses who were loggerheads at one time, surprised everyone with unexpected gestures. What grabs all the eyeballs in the video is that Rekha who was allegedly very much in love with Big B, is cheering for Amitabh Bachchan even now.

The two beautiful legendary actresses, at one time starred together in the same film with Amitabh Bachchan. Rekha and Jaya starred together in 1981 film Silsila which also starred Big B. The movie is said to be inspired by the alleged real-life love triangle of its three stars, Amitabh–Jaya–Rekha. It was the most talked about love affair back then!

Watch Video Here: https://twitter.com/ElviraRK_PC/status/691354042241523716

Major Tim to ground control: Happy birthday to my amazing wife

Astronaut Tim Peake has sent a birthday message to his wife from space.

He described his wife Rebecca as the “most amazing person I know”, and said she is “an incredible mum to our two boys, I love her to bits”.

He sent the message on Chris Evans’s BBC Radio 2 breakfast show, and ended by saying: “She listens to your show so she’ll be thrilled to hear this.”

Tim Peake talked to BBC Radio 2 (European Space Agency/YouTube)

Major Peake also answered questions from Radio 2 listeners from aboard the International Space Station.

He said: “Sometimes it feels pretty normal until you look out the window and you’re reminded of what a unique situation it is and how bizarre it is to be up here watching the Earth go by, and it goes by so quickly. We’re doing 17,500mph.”

Major Peake before he blasted off into space (Lewis Whyld/PA)

One listener, Adam from Swindon, wanted to know what space smells like, and said he would “like it to smell a bit like Swindon”.

Major Peake laughed before explaining they only get to “smell space” when people come in from a space walk.

He added: “We open up the airlock, we kind of all jump in and get the first smell of space and really, it almost smells like a metallic, burnt smell. I actually think it’s off-gassing or ionisation from the excessive heat that comes from the sun when you’re out on a space walk.”

Asked by another listener if he is now the “king of the power nap”, he said he wishes he could manage a power nap but is being kept busy.

“But I do sleep pretty well, I’m tired by the end of the day,” he said.

Major Peake also revealed that Sunday is his day off, normally spent by “chilling” and watching movies, having meals with the rest of the crew and making phone calls to friends and family back on Earth.

Asked what he will miss most when he comes home, he said it will definitely be weightlessness.

“Because it is just so much fun being able to throw yourself around in all orientations, there’s no up or down and you can move around pretty quickly and pretty efficiently,” he said.

The quirkiest question came from a listener named Adam who asked: “With gravity not around, is there potential for the ageing process to be put on hold and if so, how are your wrinkles doing?”

Major Peake responded: “You know wrinkles, varicose veins, space is great for that kind of thing, it gets rid of them all, but actually in terms of the ageing process, we accelerate unfortunately, so we’re probably ageing by quite a few years by being up here just for six months.”

The 43-year-old, from Chichester in West Sussex, is the first British astronaut to carry out a space walk and is a few weeks into his six-month mission aboard the ISS, during which he will be carrying out experiments and research.

Why the strategy the Broncos used to clobber Tom Brady may be useless against Cam Newton

(Doug Pensinger/Getty)
The Broncos’ defense will have to adjust to the Panthers’ run game.

In the AFC Championship, the Denver Broncos defense clobbered Tom Brady, sacking him four times, hitting him 20 times, and forcing him into two interceptions.

In a 20-18 win, it was the Broncos’ impressive defense that ultimately got them to the Super Bowl.

However, against the Panthers, the Broncos face a very different opponent, and their plan of attack against Tom Brady and the Patriots may be moot for one big reason.

The Panthers can run the ball.

As ESPN’s Bill Barnwell wrote after the AFC Championship, the Broncos didn’t respect the Patriots ability to run the ball whatsoever. Brady has never been a runner, and the Patriots were without Dion Lewis and LeGarrette Blount, their two starting running backs. The Patriots’ backup running backs combined for just 31 yards two weeks ago.

Instead, the Broncos didn’t blitz the Patriots, sending only three- and four-man rushes at Brady while dropping everyone else into coverage for the Patriots pass-heavy attack.

Cam Newton and the Panthers present a totally different challenge because of their ability to run the ball. According to Football Outsiders, the Panthers had the sixth-best running offense in the NFL, led by Jonathan Stewart’s 989 yards and Newton’s 636 yards.

Unlike Brady, Newton isn’t afraid to leave the pocket, and if the Broncos were to use the same game plan against him, they’d suddenly be scrambling to get defenders to bring down Newton. Similarly, the Broncos have to account for Stewart. Dropping seven into coverage while sending four linemen at Newton could leave a dangerous hole for Carolina to exploit.

The combination of Von Miller and DeMarcus Ware will present problems for Carolina’s offensive line, but both players can’t simply attack Newton like they did with Brady. Carolina has the pieces to exploit an over-aggressive pass rush, which means Miller and Ware will have to play it more steadily. Barnwell suggests in his Super Bowl prediction column that the Panthers may have to rush from the edge while using a linebacker as a spy or to fill that edge rusher’s hole.

And while the matchup may not be ideal, the Broncos were the NFL’s best defense by a wide margin this season. Defensive coordinator Wade Phillips is considered one of the best in the NFL and surely has something different up his sleeves.

Denver will have its hands full with this Panthers offense, and it would be unwise to go after Newton with the same intensity they attacked Brady.

NOW WATCH: How Peyton Manning makes and spends his money



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Two attempts were made prior to 26/11: Headley

Mumbai, Feb. 8 (ANI): David Coleman Headley, who deposed before a special Mumbai court on Monday, in a shocking revelation stated that two attempts were made prior to the final attack on November 26, 2008.
According to Headley, the first attempt was made in September 2008, which failed because the boat hit some rocks in the ocean. The people on board were saved as they were wearing life jackets. However, the weapons and explosives were lost.
He said that the second attempt was made after a month in October 2008.
“Those involved in first attempt were involved in this as well, but the attack failed,” he said.
Headley further said that it was in the third and final attempt that the attack was successful on November 26, 2008.
Headley is presently revealing the sequence of events and planning behind the 26/11 terror attacks before a special Mumbai court. (ANI)

Harry Styles, 1D management team part ways

Melbourne, Feb 3 (ANI): Harry Styles is all set to launch a solo career as he recently cut ties with One Direction’s longtime management team, Modest Management, for a new deal with CAA’s Jeffrey Azoff.
Wishing the 22-year-old singer the very best, Modest executives Richard Griffiths and Harry Magee told Billboard that it has been a real pleasure working with “a total gentleman,” adding that they know their good friend Azoff will take good care of him, Channel 24 reported.
They noted, “We look forward to sharing some great wine with them next time we are in LA.”
Styles and his One Direction bandmates, Louis Tomlinson, Niall Horan and Liam Payne, are currently enjoying an extended hiatus from the band, insisting they will get back together after their break.
However, according to Us Weekly, One Direction’s current hiatus is actually a permanent break as the bandmates decided not to renew their contract. (ANI)

Why the strategy the Broncos used to clobber Tom Brady may be useless against Cam Newton

(Doug Pensinger/Getty)
The Broncos’ defense will have to adjust to the Panthers’ run game.

In the AFC Championship, the Denver Broncos defense clobbered Tom Brady, sacking him four times, hitting him 20 times, and forcing him into two interceptions.

In a 20-18 win, it was the Broncos’ impressive defense that ultimately got them to the Super Bowl.

However, against the Panthers, the Broncos face a very different opponent, and their plan of attack against Tom Brady and the Patriots may be moot for one big reason.

The Panthers can run the ball.

As ESPN’s Bill Barnwell wrote after the AFC Championship, the Broncos didn’t respect the Patriots ability to run the ball whatsoever. Brady has never been a runner, and the Patriots were without Dion Lewis and LeGarrette Blount, their two starting running backs. The Patriots’ backup running backs combined for just 31 yards two weeks ago.

Instead, the Broncos didn’t blitz the Patriots, sending only three- and four-man rushes at Brady while dropping everyone else into coverage for the Patriots pass-heavy attack.

Cam Newton and the Panthers present a totally different challenge because of their ability to run the ball. According to Football Outsiders, the Panthers had the sixth-best running offense in the NFL, led by Jonathan Stewart’s 989 yards and Newton’s 636 yards.

Unlike Brady, Newton isn’t afraid to leave the pocket, and if the Broncos were to use the same game plan against him, they’d suddenly be scrambling to get defenders to bring down Newton. Similarly, the Broncos have to account for Stewart. Dropping seven into coverage while sending four linemen at Newton could leave a dangerous hole for Carolina to exploit.

The combination of Von Miller and DeMarcus Ware will present problems for Carolina’s offensive line, but both players can’t simply attack Newton like they did with Brady. Carolina has the pieces to exploit an over-aggressive pass rush, which means Miller and Ware will have to play it more steadily. Barnwell suggests in his Super Bowl prediction column that the Panthers may have to rush from the edge while using a linebacker as a spy or to fill that edge rusher’s hole.

And while the matchup may not be ideal, the Broncos were the NFL’s best defense by a wide margin this season. Defensive coordinator Wade Phillips is considered one of the best in the NFL and surely has something different up his sleeves.

Denver will have its hands full with this Panthers offense, and it would be unwise to go after Newton with the same intensity they attacked Brady.

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What resulted was a period of cheers and applause during a skit set on a sinking boat. 

David was playing a character who was trying to get off the doomed boat before the women and children. When he was denied, the character said he was rich and therefore better than the other passengers. 

Enter Sanders. 

Playing another passenger, Sanders went off: “I am so sick of the one percent getting the preferential treatment. We need to unite and work together if we’re all going to get through this." 

David’s character responded, "Sounds like socialism to me.” To which Sanders said, “Democratic socialism." 

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Sanders was on screen for about a minute. 

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