bbc news america


Fossilised bones of a dinosaur believed to be the largest creature ever to walk the Earth have been unearthed in Argentina, palaeontologists say.

Based on its huge thigh bones, it was 40m (130ft) long and 20m (65ft) tall.

Weighing in at 77 tonnes, it was as heavy as 14 African elephants, and seven tonnes heavier than the previous record holder, Argentinosaurus.

Scientists believe it is a new species of titanosaur - an enormous long-neck herbivore dating from the Late Cretaceous period.  They unearthed the partial skeletons of seven individuals - about 150 bones in total - all in “remarkable condition”

So people are dying in the Middle East, but the global media do not give a shit about Arabs unless we are involved in any “terrorist” related news. Two days ago a terrorist attack occurred on a busy shopping mall in Baghdad, that ended up killing at least 200 innocent people, followed by terrorist attacks today in Saudi Arabia. I don’t see the Iraqi/Saudi flag all over the social media, I don’t see the “pray for <insert a white country here> “? 

If the world doesn’t look at us and see us as the humans we are, then fuck you all 


After six incredible seasons at the helm, the multi-award winning Steven Moffat has decided to step down as the lead writer and executive producer of Doctor Who.

Steven took over the reins on Season 5 in 2010 and during his tenure the show has become a truly global success. He has been responsible for introducing the Eleventh and the Twelfth Doctors in Matt Smith and Peter Capaldi; as well as two companions Amy Pond (Karen Gillan) and Clara Oswald (Jenna Coleman) and iconic characters and monsters including River Song (Alex Kingston), Missy (Michelle Gomez), Rory Pond (Arthur Darvill) and the terrifying Weeping Angels. Plus, the smash hit 50th Anniversary special in 2013 which saw fans around the world celebrate the world’s longest running sci-fi series with the Doctors, Matt Smith, David Tennant and John Hurt battling the deadly Daleks in a feature length episode. 

Steven Moffat says: “Feels odd to be talking about leaving when I’m just starting work on the scripts for season 10, but the fact is my timey-wimey is running out. While Chris is doing his last run of Broadchurch, I’ll be finishing up on the best job in the universe and keeping the TARDIS warm for him. It took a lot of gin and tonic to talk him into this, but I am beyond delighted that one of the true stars of British Television drama will be taking the Time Lord even further into the future. At the start of season 11, Chris Chibnall will become the new showrunner of Doctor Who. And I will be thrown in a skip.”

Like Steven, Chris Chibnall is also a lifelong Doctor Who fan and a multi-award winning writer and executive producer. He has most recently achieved huge success with the triple BAFTA winning hit series Broadchurch. His other credits include BAFTA nominated The Great Train Robbery, United, Law & Order: UK, Life on Mars and Torchwood. Chris Chibnall’s debut season will launch in 2018.

Chris Chibnall, new Head Writer and Executive Producer: “Doctor Who is the ultimate BBC program: bold, unique, vastly entertaining, and adored all around the world.  So it’s a privilege and a joy to be the next curator of this funny, scary and emotional family drama. I’ve lovedDoctor Who since I was four years old, and I’m relishing the thought of working with the exceptional team at BBC Wales to create new characters, creatures and worlds for the Doctor to explore.  Steven’s achieved the impossible by continually expanding Doctor Who’s creative ambition, while growing its global popularity. He’s been a dazzling and daring showrunner, and hearing his plans and stories for 2017, it’s clear he’ll be going out with a bang. Just to make my life difficult.”

Steven’s final season will air on BBC AMERICA and BBC One in Spring 2017 and there will be a Christmas Special in 2016. [x]

20 Common Grammar Mistakes That (Almost) Everyone Makes

Who and Whom

This one opens a big can of worms. “Who” is a subjective — or nominative — pronoun, along with “he,” “she,” “it,” “we,” and “they.” It’s used when the pronoun acts as the subject of a clause. “Whom” is an objective pronoun, along with “him,” “her,” “it”, “us,” and “them.” It’s used when the pronoun acts as the object of a clause. Using “who” or “whom” depends on whether you’re referring to the subject or object of a sentence. When in doubt, substitute “who” with the subjective pronouns “he” or “she,” e.g., Who loves you? cf., He loves me.Similarly, you can also substitute “whom” with the objective pronouns “him” or “her.” e.g., I consulted an attorney whom I met in New York. cf., I consulted him.

Which and That

This is one of the most common mistakes out there, and understandably so. “That” is a restrictive pronoun. It’s vital to the noun to which it’s referring.  e.g., I don’t trust fruits and vegetables that aren’t organic. Here, I’m referring to all non-organic fruits or vegetables. In other words, I only trust fruits and vegetables that are organic. “Which” introduces a relative clause. It allows qualifiers that may not be essential. e.g., I recommend you eat only organic fruits and vegetables, which are available in area grocery stores. In this case, you don’t have to go to a specific grocery store to obtain organic fruits and vegetables. “Which” qualifies, “that” restricts. “Which” is more ambiguous however, and by virtue of its meaning is flexible enough to be used in many restrictive clauses. e.g., The house, which is burning, is mine. e.g., The house that is burning is mine.

Lay and Lie

This is the crown jewel of all grammatical errors. “Lay” is a transitive verb. It requires a direct subject and one or more objects. Its present tense is “lay” (e.g., I lay the pencil on the table) and its past tense is “laid” (e.g.,Yesterday I laid the pencil on the table). “Lie” is an intransitive verb. It needs no object. Its present tense is “lie” (e.g., The Andes mountains lie between Chile and Argentina) and its past tense is “lay” (e.g., The man lay waiting for an ambulance). The most common mistake occurs when the writer uses the past tense of the transitive “lay” (e.g., I laid on the bed) when he/she actually means the intransitive past tense of “lie" (e.g., I lay on the bed).


Contrary to common misuse, “moot” doesn’t imply something is superfluous. It means a subject is disputable or open to discussion. e.g., The idea that commercial zoning should be allowed in the residential neighborhood was a moot point for the council.

Continual and Continuous

They’re similar, but there’s a difference. “Continual” means something that’s always occurring, with obvious lapses in time. “Continuous” means something continues without any stops or gaps in between. e.g., The continual music next door made it the worst night of studying ever. e.g., Her continuous talking prevented him from concentrating.

Envy and Jealousy

The word “envy” implies a longing for someone else’s good fortunes. “Jealousy” is far more nefarious. It’s a fear of rivalry, often present in sexual situations. “Envy” is when you covet your friend’s good looks. “Jealousy” is what happens when your significant other swoons over your good-looking friend.


“Nor” expresses a negative condition. It literally means “and not.” You’re obligated to use the “nor” form if your sentence expresses a negative and follows it with another negative condition. “Neither the men nor the women were drunk” is a correct sentence because “nor” expresses that the women held the same negative condition as the men. The old rule is that “nor” typically follows “neither,” and “or” follows “either.” However, if neither “either” nor “neither” is used in a sentence, you should use “nor” to express a second negative, as long as the second negative is a verb. If the second negative is a noun, adjective, or adverb, you would use “or,” because the initial negative transfers to all conditions. e.g., He won’t eat broccoli or asparagus. The negative condition expressing the first noun (broccoli) is also used for the second (asparagus).

May and Might

“May” implies a possibility. “Might” implies far more uncertainty. “You may get drunk if you have two shots in ten minutes” implies a real possibility of drunkenness. “You might get a ticket if you operate a tug boat while drunk” implies a possibility that is far more remote. Someone who says “I may have more wine” could mean he/she doesn’t want more wine right now, or that he/she “might” not want any at all. Given the speaker’s indecision on the matter, “might” would be correct.

Whether and If

Many writers seem to assume that “whether” is interchangeable with “if.“ It isn’t. “Whether” expresses a condition where there are two or more alternatives. “If” expresses a condition where there are no alternatives. e.g., I don’t know whether I’ll get drunk tonight. e.g., I can get drunk tonight if I have money for booze.

Fewer and Less

“Less” is reserved for hypothetical quantities. “Few” and “fewer” are for things you can quantify. e.g., The firm has fewer than ten employees. e.g., The firm is less successful now that we have only ten employees.

Farther and Further

The word “farther” implies a measurable distance. “Further” should be reserved for abstract lengths you can’t always measure. e.g., I threw the ball ten feet farther than Bill. e.g., The financial crisis caused further implications.

Since and Because

“Since” refers to time. “Because” refers to causation. e.g., Since I quit drinking I’ve married and had two children. e.g., Because I quit drinking I no longer wake up in my own vomit.

Disinterested and Uninterested

Contrary to popular usage, these words aren’t synonymous. A “disinterested” person is someone who’s impartial. For example, a hedge fund manager might take interest in a headline regarding the performance of a popular stock, even if he’s never invested in it. He’s “disinterested,” i.e., he doesn’t seek to gain financially from the transaction he’s witnessed. Judges and referees are supposed to be "disinterested.” If the sentence you’re using implies someone who couldn’t care less, chances are you’ll want to use “uninterested.”


Unless you’re frightened of them, you shouldn’t say you’re “anxious to see your friends.” You’re actually “eager,” or “excited.” To be “anxious” implies a looming fear, dread or anxiety. It doesn’t mean you’re looking forward to something.

Different Than and Different From

This is a tough one. Words like “rather” and “faster” are comparative adjectives, and are used to show comparison with the preposition “than,” (e.g., greater than, less than, faster than, rather than). The adjective “different” is used to draw distinction. So, when “different” is followed by a  preposition, it should be “from,” similar to “separate from,” “distinct from,” or “away from.” e.g., My living situation in New York was different from home. There are rare cases where “different than” is appropriate, if “than” operates as a conjunction. e.g.,Development is different in New York than in Los Angeles. When in doubt, use “different from.”

Bring and Take

In order to employ proper usage of “bring” or “take,” the writer must know whether the object is being moved toward or away from the subject. If it is toward, use “bring.” If it is away, use “take.” Your spouse may tell you to “take your clothes to the cleaners.” The owner of the dry cleaners would say “bring your clothes to the cleaners.”


It isn’t a word. “Impact” can be used as a noun (e.g., The impact of the crash was severe) or a transitive verb (e.g., The crash impacted my ability to walk or hold a job). “Impactful” is a made-up buzzword, colligated by the modern marketing industry in their endless attempts to decode the innumerable nuances of human behavior into a string of mindless metrics. Seriously, stop saying this.

Affect and Effect

Here’s a trick to help you remember: “Affect” is almost always a verb (e.g., Facebook affects people’s attention spans), and “effect” is almost always a noun (e.g., Facebook’s effects can also be positive). “Affect” means to influence or produce an impression — to cause hence, an effect. “Effect” is the thing produced by the affecting agent; it describes the result or outcome. There are some exceptions. “Effect” may be used as a transitive verb, which means to bring about or make happen. e.g., My new computer effected a much-needed transition from magazines to Web porn. There are similarly rare examples where “affect” can be a noun. e.g., His lack of affect made him seem like a shallow person.

Irony and Coincidence

Too many people claim something is the former when they actually mean the latter. For example, it’s not “ironic” that “Barbara moved from California to New York, where she ended up meeting and falling in love with a fellow Californian.” The fact that they’re both from California is a “coincidence.” “Irony” is the incongruity in a series of events between the expected results and the actual results. “Coincidence” is a series of events that appear planned when they’re actually accidental. So, it would be “ironic” if “Barbara moved from California to New York to escape California men, but the first man she ended up meeting and falling in love with was a fellow Californian.”


Undoubtedly the most common mistake I encounter. Contrary to almost ubiquitous misuse, to be “nauseous” doesn’t mean you’ve been sickened: it actually means you possess the ability to produce nausea in others. e.g., That week-old hot dog is nauseous. When you find yourself disgusted or made ill by a nauseating agent, you are actually “nauseated.” e.g., I was nauseated after falling into that dumpster behind the Planned Parenthood. Stop embarrassing yourself.

If you’re looking for a practical, quick guide to proper grammar, I suggest the tried-and-true classic The Elements of Style, by William Strunk, Jr. and E. B. White. A few of these examples are listed in the book, and there are plenty more. Good luck!

'London Spy' Finale Postmortem: Edward Holcroft on Alex's Fate

Warning: This interview contains spoilers for the finale of BBC America’s London Spy.

The wait is over. After five weeks of wondering what happened to Alex (Edward Holcroft), the finale of London Spy gave us answers. And it was even more horrifying and heartbreaking than viewers of the BBC America love story-turned-mystery could have predicted.

Related: ‘London Spy’ Star Edward Holcroft Previews BBC America’s New Thriller

MI6 had placed Alex in that trunk, and when he awoke to find himself there, Frances (Charlotte Rampling), the woman who’d raised him to be a spy, had to try to convince him to move to America and leave behind both Danny (Ben Whishaw) and, more importantly, his work. Though Alex reluctantly agreed, MI6 used his own lie-detection technique against him to determine that he wasn’t being truthful when he said he’d go, never see Danny again, and forget about his work — and when he returned Frances’s “I love you.” Though Frances begged for a chance to speak to him again, she was drugged and driven home while Alex was left to die.    

Holcroft spoke to Yahoo TV about filming that brutal scene.

Take us through shooting Alex’s final scene. Were you actually in a box?
I was. They put me in a trunk, and… yeah, it was hard. I’m not going to lie. I haven’t got a problem with small spaces or claustrophobia or anything like that, but I remember, when we did it, Charlotte Rampling was on the other side of the box to read the lines — it was really quite moving, actually. And when we cut, I got out and I was getting quite upset. I didn’t know why. I was naked, and it was a very comfortable set to work on and everyone was incredibly sensitive and professional. But I remember when I got out, I just wanted space, and I could feel it brewing up in me. Charlotte became my mom almost and was sort of like, “Everyone, get out of the way. Give him space. Leave him alone.” She was so sweet, which made me get even more upset.

Had you been filming the scene for hours?
At least three quarters of a day, so a good five to six hours. I wasn’t in the box for six hours, but it was more the psychological aspect of it —  the thought of, if that could happen to someone, if you could be stuck in the space that small… It was hard, but it looked good, so I’m happy.

And since we don’t actually see Alex take his last breath after he’s left there to die, you can imagine those final moments as a viewer and its haunts you. Did you film his last breath?
No, that was pretty much it. I had friends, people who’ve watched the last episode, saying, “Are you sure you’re dead, or did you come out after?” People didn’t want to fully believe that he’s dead. They still think that there’s a twist. They still think Alex went to America.

Creator Tom Rob Smith has said he never intended for it to be ambiguous, whether Alex was really dead, even when his body was found at the end of the premiere.
The whole story is so ambiguous by nature. When I read the scripts, that was what I loved about it. It was different: you couldn’t place anything anywhere, compared to so many scripts that one reads now, where you can sort of predict things very fast and it’s all kind of the same. I love the unpredictability. It makes it haunting. It makes it uncomfortable. It was sort of quite fitting that it just ended in the way it did.

Going back to the premiere, whenever Alex turned up the radio and told Danny that he couldn’t go anywhere without getting a new battery for his computer… did he know that something was about to happen to him?
I think he knew. He’s a very intelligent man, and I think he knew that his world would be watching him very closely, because of his relationship with Danny and when he started his work on creating this theory of proving lying. I was playing it like he knew that it’s probably just a matter of time before they do something. Whether or not he knew that they were going to the extent of taking him away or killing him, I don’t know. But I think when you work for people like that and there are secrets that are that important, you know the full consequences.

Related: 'London Spy’ Review : Love, Secrets, and Mystery

It’s clear why he wouldn’t want to leave Danny, the only person he’s ever connected with. In your mind, why didn’t he want to let go of the research even when it meant death? Is it because he hated what spies had made him so much that he wanted to destroy their ability to lie?
Scottie [Jim Broadbent] says it at some point during the story: Alex was ashamed of the lies that he had told Danny, and I think this was his proof of true love to Danny, that he could do this, because everything up until then had been a lie — what he told him he did, where he was going, what he was doing.

I think it was his way of telling Danny how much he loved him, because he wasn’t capable of showing it any other way. He was so socially reclusive. This was his way of trying to deal with the shame of the lies that he told him. His whole life had been a lie, and it was his sort of revenge, as it were.

Donald Trump’s main contribution to humanity was to tell, and make it clear, what everyone in right-wing America was secretly thinking. All the arrogance. All the evilness. All the racist hatefulness.

GOPers: “This man is speaking the truth about us! How cool!”

*national and worldwide horror sets in because Trump is obviously a sick, sad mad man*

GOPers: “ This man is speaking the truth about us! Oh, fuck!”

So, let me get this straight, Donald Trump is a racist, sexist, anti-Muslim, ultra-nationalist, pro-military, right-wing billionaire politician who encourages his supporters to beat up anyone who disagrees with him? Well, he certainly sounds like my kind of President.