baylings

10

TOUGH ONE !
I hope it helps a bunch of you out there :)

LINKS

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school tuitions :
-Gobelins
-Calarts
-Sheridan
-Animation Workshop
-PIvaut
-Supinfocom
-Emile Cohl
awesome self taught artists :
-Nesskain
-Samkat 
-Madeleine Flores
-Pierre Nicolas Bayle
(and many others of course, they’re just from the top of my head)
Useful other links
-Jake Parker about being self taught or going to college
-CH Greenblatt on using the internet to find talent
-Variety article about the search for talents on the internet
-JG QUINTEL says in this interview he hired a storyboard artist through twitter
Good online animation schools:
-http://storyboardsecrets.com/
-http://radhowtoschool.com/
-http://johnkcurriculum.blogspot.jp/
-http://www.animationmentor.com/
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My other tutorials
My reference list
Why Quantity, Not Quality, Makes You Fluent In Japanese

I’d like the start this article with a quote from “Art & Fear”, a book written by David Bayles and Ted Orland.

The ceramics teacher announced on opening day that he was dividing the class into two groups. All those on the left side of the studio, he said, would be graded solely on the quantity of work they produced, all those on the right solely on its quality. His procedure was simple: on the final day of class he would bring in his bathroom scales and weigh the work of the “quantity” group: fifty pound of pots rated an “A”, forty pounds a “B”, and so on. Those being graded on “quality”, however, needed to produce only one pot – albeit a perfect one – to get an “A”.

Well, came grading time and a curious fact emerged: the works of highest quality were all produced by the group being graded for quantity. It seems that while the “quantity” group was busily churning out piles of work – and learning from their mistakes – the “quality” group had sat theorizing about perfection, and in the end had little more to show for their efforts than grandiose theories and a pile of dead clay.

These two paragraphs are what inspired Tofugu’s 500 Japanese Sentences (which later became 4500 Japanese Sentences, available now btw), a workbook that gives you a lot of Japanese sentences to translate, based off of words that are ordered by frequency of use. The focus, of course, is all on quantity, not quality. If you don’t know how to translate something and can’t figure it out quickly, move on. If you’re confused, move on. If you’re stuck, move on. Do what’s at your ability level and what’s slightly above it and skip the rest. It’ll be there waiting for you on your second run through.

This goes against what most people are taught in school. In fact, there’s a popular saying you’ve probably heard a lot: “Quality over quantity.” It turns out, though, that quantity creates quality, and this can be applied to pretty much any skill you’re trying to develop, Japanese included.

Click here to read the full article