bauhaus style

Stairways - Bauhaus is the common term for the Staatliches Bauhaus , a school in Germany that combined crafts and the fine arts, and for the approach to design that it publicized and taught. It operated from 1919 to 1933. The Bauhaus school was founded by Walter Gropius in Weimar. Bauhaus style became one of the most influential currents in Modernist architecture and modern design. © GMAdesigns

Raf Simons spring—summer 1999.

Raf Simons organised his show at the “Cité des Sciences et de l’Industrie” in Paris on the 3rd of July 1998. The “Kinetic Youth” collection was presented outside, in front of the enormous mirror ball located in La Villette’s Science and Industry museum in Paris. The set refers to the architectural influences in Raf Simons’ life and also to kinetic objects from his youth. Raf Simons used different songs of David Bowie during the whole show. 

The opening part:
The show opened with David Bowie’s “Space Oddity” and the opening part was inspired by the graphic style of “Bauhaus”;
-Clean lines
-Shirts with white/black contrast (different black pleats in the back and black triangle on the front)
-Black wool pants with on the front one, two or three pleats 

The second part:
A group of very young teenagers wearing white turtleneck shirts with an “R” symbol, stitched on the collar. Their pants were all in different colours; red, petrol, light grey, mint, beige mêlée, marine…The models walked together in a group on the bridge, on one side of the runway leading to the mirror ball, then to the central building and to the bridge on the opposite side of the first one.
-Inspiration: School Memories, for example gymnastic lessons in uniform, repetition.
-Music: “Life on Mars”, David Bowie.

The global idea behind the last two show parts was the inspiration of the “Rubik’s cube” object; order and disorder of colours.

The third part:
Classic ton-sur-ton outfits with merino wool knitted pullovers and classic suits. This time the pleated pants are light grey, beige mêlée, brown and marine.

The fourth part:
The most important material in this part was the coloured leather. Raf Simons showed mixed coloured outfits, like trashed cutted rock t-shirts in yellow and green, with large leather jogging pants and sleeveless tunic jackets. Colours brown, grey, light grey, aubergine, mint, green, red……
-Music: “Heroes”, David Bowie.

The song of the final part: ”Another brick in the Wall” from Pink Floyd. The whole group of ca. 60 boys walked quite fast on the runway, but now in the opposite direction. The order becomes a disorder, as in the song: ”we don’t need no education”. Raf Simons feels inspired by youth culture: on one side they are wearing uniforms, but inside they still feel like HEROES, like unique individuals.

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The architecture of #Palestine during the British Mandate

New ‘Social Construction’ exhibit at the Israel Museum explores the European influence on the evolution of Israel’s modernist visual heritage.

“Social Construction,” a new exhibit at the #Israel Museum in #Jerusalem running through December 31, 2016, puts a spotlight on the “white architecture” that early 20th century European modernists imported to pre-state Palestine – and the social values this style reflects.

Curator Oren Sagiv gathered roughly 40 analytical and interpretive drawings together with more than 60 archival photographs of some of the iconic architectural projects built between 1930 and 1940 during the time of the British Mandate.

The Bialik School in Tel Aviv was built in the 1930s by Yaacov Shiffman (Ben Sira). Photo from the Kalter Collection

Of course, Tel Aviv is nicknamed the White City for its unrivalled abundance of these simple white, rounded buildings designed in what is known as the Bauhaus or International style. But they’re found in large numbers also in Jerusalem and #Haifa.

This classic #Bauhaus building at 65 Hovavei Tzion Street in Tel Aviv was built in 1935 by Pinchas Hit (Philip Huett). Photo from the Kalter Collection

The 1930 May Cinema in #Haifa was done by Yehuda Lilienfeld. Photo from the Kalter #Collection

“Social Construction” shows how the development of these urban centers “emerged from the influence of international modernism while forming a unique architectural language inspired by the ambitions to establish a new state and to create a new social order,” according to the museum.

A peek into “Social Construction” at the Israel Museum. Photo: courtesy

“The influx of immigration to Palestine following the Russian Revolution of 1905 and the concurrent political upheavals in eastern Europe brought a generation of architects who embraced modernism as a new beginning.”

Architectural plans for The Casino, a landmark building on the Bat Galim promenade of Haifa built in 1934 by Alfred Goldberg. Photo courtesy of the #Israel #Museum

Located in the museum’s new Palevsky Design Pavilion, “Social Construction” draws on the research of Israeli architects Ada Karmi-Melamede and Dan Price, co-authors of Architecture in Palestine During the British mandate, 1917-1948. An English translation of the book was published as a companion to the exhibition.

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Week 9 | Communication Design Studies

In this week’s lecture, we learned about Bauhaus. Staatliches Bauhaus, commonly known simply as Bauhaus, was a German art school operational from 1919 to 1933 that combined crafts and the fine arts, and was famous for the approach to design that it publicised and taught.
The Bauhaus was founded by Walter Gropius in Weimar. The German term Bauhaus—literally “construction house"—was understood as meaning "School of Building”, but in spite of its name and the fact that its founder was an architect, the Bauhaus did not have an architecture department during its first years of existence. Nonetheless, it was founded with the idea of creating a “total” work of art (Gesamtkunstwerk) in which all arts, including architecture, would eventually be brought together. The Bauhaus style later became one of the most influential currents in modern design, Modernist architecture and art, design and architectural education. he Bauhaus had a profound influence upon subsequent developments in art, architecture, graphic design, interior design, industrial design, and typography.
The school existed in three German cities: Weimar from 1919 to 1925, Dessau from 1925 to 1932 and Berlin from 1932 to 1933, under three different architect-directors: Walter Gropius from 1919 to 1928, Hannes Meyer from 1928 to 1930 and Ludwig Mies van der Rohe from 1930 until 1933, when the school was closed by its own leadership under pressure from the Nazi regime, having been painted as a centre of communist intellectualism. Although the school was closed, the staff continued to spread its idealistic precepts as they left Germany and emigrated all over the world.
The changes of venue and leadership resulted in a constant shifting of focus, technique, instructors, and politics. For example, the pottery shop was discontinued when the school moved from Weimar to Dessau, even though it had been an important revenue source; when Mies van der Rohe took over the school in 1930, he transformed it into a private school, and would not allow any supporters of Hannes Meyer to attend it.

Futura typeface

In typography, Futura is a geometric sans-serif typeface designed in 1927 by German graphic designer Paul Renner. It was designed as a contribution on the New Frankfurt-project. It is based on geometric shapes that became representative of visual elements of the Bauhaus design style of 1919 - 1933. [wikipedia]