battle of the bulges

theguardian.com
Donald Malarkey dies aged 96
The second world war veteran was a member of Easy Company, whose recollections of fighting Nazi in Europe were later dramatized for HBO

Donald Malarkey, a Second World War soldier who was awarded the Bronze Star after parachuting behind enemy lines at Normandy to destroy German artillery on D-day, has died. He was 96.

Malarkey was one of several members of Easy Company to be portrayed in the HBO miniseries Band of Brothers. He died on Saturday in Salem, Oregon, of age-related causes, his son-in-law John Hill said on Sunday.

Malarkey fought across France, the Netherlands and Belgium and with Easy Company fought off Nazi advances while surrounded at Bastogne during the Battle of the Bulge in December 1944.

He was often praised for his actions during the war. In 2009, he was presented with the Légion d’Honneur – the highest honor awarded by the French government.

Bring on the Battle of the ...

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1945 - Lt. Col. Otto Skorzeny, rescuer of Benito Mussolini and reputedly the would-be assassin of Gen. Eisenhower during the Battle of the Bulge, shown in his cell in the witness wing of the Nuremberg jail.

The world of Pixar’s Cars is pretty much exactly like our own, but with one key difference: Humanity has been replaced by sentient cars who murder the ozone layer with every breath. Other than that? Same shit, different body shapes.

Now, consider the backstory of one character in particular: Sarge. Sarge is an Army Jeep who was built (Born? Bred?) for war. Specifically, World War II. His primary purpose is slashing the tires and fuel lines of German Panzers. According to the Blu-Ray extras, Sarge loves talking about his WWII days, “Like the time his tank friend lost his track in the Battle of the Bulge, and Sarge had to tow him to safety.” That means even the battles are the same across worlds. Even Sarge’s license plate refers to the year of the Pearl Harbor attack – the year America officially became part of the war effort.

And you can see that, apart from the fact that it was fought entirely by motor vehicles, everything about WWII appears to be exactly the same. Which … very strongly implies that all of the atrocities of WWII also happened, only to cute whimsical cars. Nazi Volkswagens rounding up poor, innocent Opels and sending them to the scrapheap. Vintage Mazdas, their paint still scarred with radiation burns some 60 years after the Nagasaki and Hiroshima bombings. Even airplanes are sentient in this universe, which means some of them personally dropped those bombs.

A ‘Cars’ Holocaust? 5 Insane Implications In Famous Movies 

Lieutenant Colonel Ronald C. Speirs (20 April 1920 – 11 April 2007) was a United States Army officer who served in the 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment of the 101st Airborne Division during World War II. He was initially assigned as a platoon leader in either Charlie or Baker Company of the 1st Battalion of the 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment. Speirs was reassigned to Dog Company of the 2nd Battalion prior to the invasion of Normandy in June 1944, before his unit was absorbed into Easy Company, of which he was given command during the assault on Foy after the Battle of the Bulge in Bastogne. Speirs also served in Korea, where he commanded a rifle company, and later became the American governor for Spandau Prison in Berlin. He reached the rank of captain while serving in the European Theater during World War II and retired as a lieutenant colonel.