battle monument

Happy Memorial Day! 

Today we celebrate those men and women who have bravely given their lives for our nation. A recent research expedition to Midway Atoll in Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument commemorated the 75th anniversary of the Battle of Midway and honored the legacy of the brave men who helped turn the tide in the Pacific during the battle. 

Scientists explored sunken aircraft associated with the battle, adding an important maritime heritage component to our understanding of the broader history of World War II in the Pacific. They also investigated the role shipwrecks and debris may play in harboring invasive species in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. Here, diver Brian Hauk sets an invasive species quadrat on the stern of the USS Macaw

(Image courtesy of Brett Seymour, Exploring the Sunken Heritage of Midway Atoll expedition)

“In thirty, forty years, I’ll come back here and think back on a conversation I knew I’d never forget, much as I might want to someday. Then I’d stand here and ask the statue and the straw-backed chairs and shaky wooden tables to remind me of someone called Oliver.” - Monumento ai Caduti (1924), Crema, Italy.

“In one of the film’s most daring choices, the realization that the two might be talking about the same thing is shot around a Battle of the Piave monument on a piazza in a wide shot, Elio’s back toward the camera and Oliver much further back, his face barely visible. The counterintuitive choice places the two men, talking about the love that dares not speak its name, out in the open but because we can’t see their faces clearly, they could be anyone.” (x)

anonymous asked:

tbh tho, i blame most of Aang's character towards Katara on those bryke assholes. Like if Ehasz had continued to writer at the front of everything then i bet SO MUCH WOULDVE BEEN BETTER ugh

Well, of course— you can’t ‘blame’ Aang for his behavior as his behavior is the product of the creators and writers. However, for the sake of critiquing ATLA (or any media), it only makes sense to pinpoint character actions, rather than washing your hands of negative behaviors portrayed in a relationship and chalking it up to bad writing. The reason for critiquing is to create better writing in the future— and thereby create better characters who properly display respect for one each other.

That’s not to say I don’t agree with your comment, however. Based on various analyses I’ve read, I dare say Bryke were largely in control of Aang and were extremely adverse to any development that hinted at a separation between Aang and Katara. To them, Katara was a prize for Aang’s feats as the Avatar,. This was clearly illustrated by the many advances Aang made towards her, his efforts growing particularly aggressive before monumental battles.

Even more so, Bryke’s opinion of Katara as a mere reward was further demonstrated by her lack of voice on the matter of Kataang. Every interaction between Aang and Katara was overwhelmingly told through his eyes. From beginning, Aang looked at her through rose-colored lenses. He put her on a pedestal, believed she was perfect, and thereby only saw perfection in her. She was not free to be herself around him, unless the version of herself being portrayed was that of a nurturing mother. Any romantic connection between them was never voiced by her and rarely made evident, but for the few and far between blushes that came in Season One (The Fortune Teller, and The Headband). Other than these instances, most advances made by Aang were either rejected (which he chose to ignore and kiss her anyways— Ember Island Players, or he lashed out violently— Love Is A Battlefield) or Katara moved on without a second thought (The Cave of Two Lovers) or looked aside with a downcast grimace (The Day of Black Sun & Ember Island Players).

For me, the evidence of Bryke’s distaste for any opinions from Katara was made abundantly clear in The Fortune Teller. Aang receives an ambiguous fortune of a great struggle, of his tremendous destiny, and is prominently displayed as the hero of the entire episode, despite it being Sokka’s wit that saved the village.

On the flip side, Katara has her entire life laid out before her, from how many children she will have, to when she will pass away. Additionally, she is told she will marry a ‘very powerful bender.’ At a glance, this could be loose enough— a powerful bender could mean anyone, from Haru to Aang to Zuko. Even Toph and Azula fit into this prediction!

However, the final comment from Sokka, after Aang’s amazing display of airbending and his saving of the day—

Sokka, appearing amazed: “Wow, that kid is one powerful bender”
Katara, looking shocked: “What did you say?”
Sokka, shrugging: “Nothing. Aang’s just a really powerful bender.”
Katara, blushing and looking amazed: “I suppose he is.”

—sealed the deal regarding Bryke’s view of Katara.

In a show centered around shaping your world, finding your destiny, and creating a better reality, Katara was given no choice in her future whatsoever. There was no mention of her future as a master at fourteen. There was no promise of her destiny as the greatest waterbender, bloodbender, and healer. Her aid in training the Oh So Powerful Bender, her victory over Azula, her saving of the world’s only hope at a decent Fire Lord— not mentioned. She was to marry Aang, she was to be amazed by him, and she was to have three children, then die from old age. And if LOK is any indication, without other writers in the picture, Katara may as well have been a side note in ATLA, too.

Another side note: Even Sokka’s fortune is ambiguous and vague (He will face a lot of misfortune or whatever, as most of it is his own doing—- nothing different from what we all already expected given his development at that point in the story and Meng’s destiny is simply to marry a man with big ears. This showed an extreme preference for males having more say in their destiny over females. Males were to do great things, romantics aside. Females were simply to marry, all their value coming from their spouse.

Meanwhile the Ehasz couple had a large hand in Zuko’s characterization and Aaron Ehasz was responsible for the development of Katara into a WOC feminist icon (not to mention, the existence of Toph and Azula). Had Aaron been allowed complete control, or at least, enough to affect the shipping, we would’ve seen a slightly more pronounced development of Zutara and the natural rifts that appeared in Kataang would’ve been expanded. Furthermore, Season Three would not have been such a jumbled mess of will they or won’t they between Aang and Katara.

Aaron had respect for all the characters affected by his writing— unlike Bryke. He did not godmod one character, put down the rest to further pronounce one character’s heroics, and he not force a pairing together with little to no say from one side of said pairing. His respect for the characters can be demonstrated in a similar fashion that I illustrated Bryke’s disrespect: by referring to the Ehasz’s preferred ship and the interactions between both parties.

For the sake of keeping this concise, let’s ignore Katara and Zuko’s time as mutually respected and challenging enemies, and skip straight to their conversation below Ba Sing Se.

It was what, five minutes? Five minutes of Katara yelling and raging and Zuko sitting there in silence. It took five minutes for the viewer to gain the background story of the necklace, her mother’s death, and her anger towards the Fire Nation. I don’t want to say it was because she felt safe with Zuko, but I will say it was because she felt he would understand her anger. If nothing else, he was just someone who would listen to her, unlike everyone else in her life at that point.

Surprisingly, Zuko sympathized with her and opened up about his own background. Of everyone who knew, or I assumed knew, it was Zuko— her enemy— that said “Hey, I get it, and I’m sorry.”  He listened. He responded. He understood.

Wasn’t it Ehasz himself who said no one got katara like Zuko, and vice versa?

It can be argued that Aang understood her loss— he lost his entire culture, I would hope he understood Katara’s feelings— but how much can one know if he never asks?

From the very beginning, so much of the dynamic between Katara and Aang was her sheltering him from the reality and the pain of the world’s current state. She softly hinted that the airbenders had disappeared. She tried to hide evidence of the Fire Nation at the Southern Temple. She coddled him in the desert and held the group together as he fell apart. After every loss and every battle, she uplifted him, helped him, and focused solely on what he was feeling and what they needed to do moving forward.

Never once did Aang return the favor. Yes, he was kind. Yes, he was thoughtful. He did make her a replacement necklace. He did happily surprise her with the regained betrothal necklace. He did make an effort to help her learn waterbending in the North Pole. But the things that mattered, the deep things, the burning things…

Hey Katara, I know you lost your necklace. What did it mean to you?
Hey Katara, I know you lost your mother. Tell me about her.
Hey Katara, I know you’re upset with your father. What’s wrong?
Hey Katara, I know you’re afraid of losing me. Does it hurt you when I fly off?
Hey Katara, I know your father is imprisoned. Is there anything I can do?
Hey Katara, I know this man caused you deep pain. Tell me why hunting him down will help you.
Hey Katara, you know you mean something to me. What do I mean to you?

Tell me, did he ask her any of these questions? Even once? I’m afraid the answer is no. Aang wanted Katara to care for him and be there for him, but he did not return the same sentiment towards her.

But you know who did? Zuko. In the Crystal Catacombs, and multiple times following.

When her father was taken by the Fire Nation, he not only showed concern for her (indirectly), he showed concern for Sokka. He paid attention to the emotions of those around him and offered his aid. And when the family was reunited, the happiness on his face was unbridled. I don’t remember Aang asking or even mentioning Hakoda’s name following the Day of Black sun.

In the Southern Raiders episode, Zuko quickly picked up on Katara’s lingering anger and made every effort to understand her emotions, earn her forgiveness, and promote her own personal healing. He stood behind her in silent support during their journey. He backed her in front of Aang and Sokka. He did not try to voice his own opinions. I remember Aang telling her over and over and over again that she was wrong and ‘acting like Jet.’

In the finale, Zuko opened up to Katara about his Uncle, but instead of it being a one-sided type of thing (where she’s constantly checking up on him, but never receiving support of her own), the conversation was mutual and friendly. It was obvious they were close. It was obvious he respected her. It was obvious that Katara did not have to mother him to make him feel better.

Do you need any cheek kisses, Zuko, to make all your boo-boos better?

Additionally, Zuko looked to Katara as an equally capable bender, the only one he wanted by his side in that final fight. He sought to defend her and he valued her life above his own.

The connection between them was blatant. We didn’t need cheap episodes of dancing and contrived blushing to know what either side was feeling because Zuko and Katara asked each other. There was a mutual support, a mutual uplifting of the other. Katara was permitted a voice in her relationship with Zuko. She was permitted to be powerful and outspoken and she was respected.

Ehasz didn’t view her as a reward, therefore, through his writing, she wasn’t treated as such. And had his shipping preferences been endgame, had there been a fourth book as he envisioned, I’d venture a guess that you’re correct— the treatment of Katara, the progression of Zutara and digression of Kataang, and the development of Aang would’ve been handled beautifully. The viewers would have been offered the closure we lacked (the closure the comics are mutilating) and the characters would have been given the ending they all deserved.

youtube

Middle-earth: Shadow of War

Story Trailer

Showcasing Talion and Celebrimbor as they use the power of the New Ring to forge an army and confront the deadliest of enemies, including Sauron and his Nazgul, in a monumental battle for Middle-earth™.

4

The Motherland Calls (Russian: Родина-мать зовёт! Rodina-Mat’ zovyot!), also called Mother Motherland, Mother Motherland Is Calling, simply The Motherland, or The Mamayev Monument, is a statue in Mamayev Kurgan in Volgograd, Russia, commemorating the Battle of Stalingrad. It was designed by sculptor Yevgeny Vuchetich and structural engineer Nikolai Nikitin, and declared the largest statue in the world in 1967.

Compared with the later higher statues, The Motherland Calls is significantly more complex from an engineering point of view, due to its characteristic posture with a sword raised high in the right hand and the left hand extended in a calling gesture. The technology behind the statue is based on a combination of prestressed concrete with wire ropes structure, a solution which can be found also in another work of Nikitin’s, the super-tall Ostankino Tower in Moscow.

THE SEA IS HISTORY

By Derek Walcott

Where are your monuments, your battles, martyrs?
Where is your tribal memory? Sirs,
in that grey vault. The sea. The sea
has locked them up. The sea is History.

First, there was the heaving oil,
heavy as chaos;
then, like a light at the end of a tunnel,

the lantern of a caravel,
and that was Genesis.
Then there were the packed cries,
the shit, the moaning:

Exodus.
Bone soldered by coral to bone,
mosaics
mantled by the benediction of the shark’s shadow,

that was the Ark of the Covenant.
Then came from the plucked wires
of sunlight on the sea floor

the plangent harps of the Babylonian bondage,
as the white cowries clustered like manacles
on the drowned women,

and those were the ivory bracelets
of the Song of Solomon,
but the ocean kept turning blank pages

looking for History.
Then came the men with eyes heavy as anchors
who sank without tombs,

brigands who barbecued cattle,
leaving their charred ribs like palm leaves on the shore,
then the foaming, rabid maw

of the tidal wave swallowing Port Royal,
and that was Jonah,
but where is your Renaissance?

Sir, it is locked in them sea-sands
out there past the reef’s moiling shelf,
where the men-o’-war floated down;

strop on these goggles, I’ll guide you there myself.
It’s all subtle and submarine,
through colonnades of coral,

past the gothic windows of sea-fans
to where the crusty grouper, onyx-eyed,
blinks, weighted by its jewels, like a bald queen;

and these groined caves with barnacles
pitted like stone
are our cathedrals,

and the furnace before the hurricanes:
Gomorrah. Bones ground by windmills
into marl and cornmeal,

and that was Lamentations—
that was just Lamentations,
it was not History;

then came, like scum on the river’s drying lip,
the brown reeds of villages
mantling and congealing into towns,

and at evening, the midges’ choirs,
and above them, the spires
lancing the side of God

as His son set, and that was the New Testament.

Then came the white sisters clapping
to the waves’ progress,
and that was Emancipation—

jubilation, O jubilation—
vanishing swiftly
as the sea’s lace dries in the sun,

but that was not History,
that was only faith,
and then each rock broke into its own nation;

then came the synod of flies,
then came the secretarial heron,
then came the bullfrog bellowing for a vote,

fireflies with bright ideas
and bats like jetting ambassadors
and the mantis, like khaki police,

and the furred caterpillars of judges
examining each case closely,
and then in the dark ears of ferns

and in the salt chuckle of rocks
with their sea pools, there was the sound
like a rumour without any echo

of History, really beginning.

INVINCIBLE #139

STORY: ROBERT KIRKMAN
ART / COVER: RYAN OTTLEY & NATHAN FAIRBAIRN
AUGUST 16 / 24 PAGES / FC / M / $2.99
“THE END OF ALL THINGS,” Part Seven. Alliances shift as the battle rages on…it’s the biggest, most brutal, most monumental battle in INVINCIBLE history!

I’m miserable with a UTI and trying to distract myself so SURVEY TIME: do you hypothesize Themiscyran culture as being roughly Athenian or??? I ask because I’m trying to sort out funeral traditions and cremation seems like a possibility because limited space, but also the image of the Amazons carving terraces into the island after that battle for graves and monuments, which is not something they’ve never needed to do before… I’m torn. 

5
A comiXologist Recommends:
Eric Arroyo recommends Batman: The Jiro Kuwata Batmanga #1

In 1966, while the Adam West Batman series was becoming a phenomenon, Jiro Kuwata took Batman to Japan in the pages of Shonen King Magazine, depicting a familiar-looking hero through a black-and-white, horror-scifi filter. After highlighting the series in the collection Bat-Manga!: The Secret History of Batman in Japan, DC is now releasing weekly chapters from the original Batman manga, and the first two story arcs have recently wrapped up on ComiXology.

Instead of radically changing the Batman mythos for a Japanese audience, Kuwata brings grim but over-the-top villains and a ‘60s science action aesthetic to Gotham City. The magic of Kuwata’s Batman stories comes from his marriage of disparate elements. Lord Death Man, the rogue in the opening arc, exemplifies this: he comes out of the shadows with a grizzly visage and power over death itself, but he’s as theatrical as he is creepy. Here, grim and ruthless villains add a texture of horror to ludicrous and delightful action stories. 

These stories tumble through tragic origin stories and chilling nightmares, while hitting absurd set pieces along the way, like a climactic battle atop a giant monument to Batman. With their unique perspective, Kuwata’s Batman stories can use these playful situations to subvert our expectations; while Batman vs Doctor Faceless appears like a traditional villain origin, it goes in farcical directions to pull the reader into a fresh and serious twist.

Kuwata’s Batman is also a testament to the strengths of mid-‘60s manga storytelling. Using efficient line work and paneling, Kuwata clearly depicts impactful action that flows through the page. Occasional spot-color adds an extra expressive element to stories full of rich hatching and pen-line texture.

If you love diving into vintage action manga like Cyborg 009, or you’re taking advantage of Batman’s 75th anniversary to explore other interpretations of the character, like in Batman ’66, pick up Batman: The Jiro Kuwata Batmanga. Come for Lord Death Man, stay for the wrecking-ball surfing.

[Read Batman: The Jiro Kuwata Batmanga!]

Eric Alexander Arroyo is a Brooklyn-based cartoonist and a Digital Editor at comiXology. He’s probably drawing giant robots and listening to ABBA.

Sardarapat Memorial is a memorial complex to the victory of the Battle of Sardarapat located in the village of Arax, in the Armavir Province of Armenia,

Located close to the town of Armavir, in the Armavir province of Armenia. The memorial is a symbol of pride, victory and survival of the Armenian People, It’s memorial is to the Battle of Sardarapat that took place in late may of 1918 and was five days of brutal fighting between Armenian makeshift units, civilians and the Ottoman Empire. 

In the words of Christopher J. Walker, had the Armenians lost this battle, “it is perfectly possible that the word Armenia would have henceforth denoted only an antique geographical term.”

External image

Against tremendous odds, and during the haunting backdrop of a continuing genocide , Armenia’s makeshift army rebuffed the Turkish troops and safeguarded the small portion of historic Armenia, what became the current republic.

The entrance of the memorial stands huge winged oxen made by red tufa stone, which is common in Armenian architecture. Steps lead to a square from which a 26 metre tall high bell tower rises. The bells ring every year on the day of the historic victory. The monument is gaurded by massive Armenian style winged lions and eagles.

Monument At Antietam National Battlefield, Dedicated In 1997

The lineage of the Irish Brigade has been officially assigned to “Fighting 69th” of the New York National Guard, which is the only currently active military unit that formed part of it.

On September 17, 1862, the Union and Confederate armies met at Sharpsburg Maryland, in the Battle of Antietam. Command confusion led to the disjointed use of the II Corps, and instead of supporting renewed assaults on the Confederate left at the West Woods, the Irish Brigade found itself facing the center of the Confederate line, entrenched in an old sunken farm road. 

The brigade again acted conspicuously, assaulting the road, referred to after the battle as “Bloody Lane”. Although unsuccessful, the brigade’s attack gave supporting troops enough time to flank and break the Confederate position, at the cost of 60% casualties for the Irish Brigade.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irish_Brigade_%28U.S.%29