bats with bears

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Here’s a thing I’ve been working on for a while, redesigns for a lot of Sonic characters! I don’t like that as the series went on, the characters became more and more tied to a mold, so my aim was to make them varied, fun, and at the same time, consistent between each other.

Some notes:

  • Amy and Shadow are no longer hedgehogs, decided to make Sonic the only hedgehog. To be honest I didn’t settle on what species Amy is supposed to be, though she has some bunny-esque features, but Shadow was based off of tasmanian devils.

  • Amy is now a witch, and her Piko-Piko Hammer acts like a magical girl wand and broom. She’s a spring witch, casting those yellow and red springs you see in Sonic levels from her hammer, which are also two springs!

  • The second Blaze is just her without her sleeves and with her hair untied, to show what her paws and hair look like.

  • Jet is based off of a peregrine falcon

  • Bark the Polar Bear is now a girl.

Being Little: Nicknames

These are just a couple nicknames that are not meant for a specific gender, nor are they for everyone!

Nicknames:
~Angel
~Babe
~Baby
~Baby Boy
~Baby Cakes
~Baby Doll
~Baby Girl
~Bambi
~Bat
~Bear
~Beautiful
~Boo
~Brat
~Bunny
~Buttercup
~Cookie
~Cuddle Bug
~Cupcake
~Cutie
~Cutie Pie
~Cutie Patoot(ie)
~Darling
~Dear
~Deary
~Doe
~Doll
~Dove
~Dumpling
~Everything
~Flower
~Fox
~Fruit Loop
~Gorgeous
~Gumdrop
~Handsome
~Honey
~Honey Bun
~Hun
~Jelly Bean
~Kiddo
~Kitten
~Kitty
~Lamb
~Lamb Chop
~Little
~Little Boy
~Little Girl
~Little One
~Love
~Lovely
~Lovie
~Muffin
~My Everything
~My One and Only
~My Love
~My World
~Num Nums
~Other Half
~Pancake
~Panda
~Peach
~Peanut
~Pet
~Prince
~Princess
~Pooh
~Pookie
~Precious
~Pudding
~Pumpkin
~Puppy
~Rose
~Smoochie
~Snuggles
~Star
~Sugar
~Sunflower
~Sunshine
~Sweetheart
~Sweetie
~Teddy Bear
~Tiger
~Tinkerbell
~Tootsie
~Wolfie

  • Jon: Do you have any pets? I have a dog!
  • Damian: yes let me introduce you
  • Damian: this is my dog Titus
  • Damian: this is my cat Alfred
  • Damian: this is my cow Batcow
  • Damian: this is my winged red bear-bat monster Goliath
  • Damian: this is my turkey Jerry
  • Damian: and this is Jason Todd.
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The overwhelming majority of bats are friends of humanity. They gobble up the insects that bite us and ruin our crops. They pollinate flowers and they replant forests by spreading seeds around. But as agriculture overtakes rain forests and jungles, humans have come into conflict with one bat species: the common vampire bat.

In Latin America, vampire bats drink the blood of livestock. Very rarely, these bats contract rabies. Before they die, they can spread the deadly virus to pigs, chickens, cows — and even humans. The disease costs farmers in Latin America $30 million every year and kills dozens of people. In March of this year, a man in Brazil reportedly died of rabies after being bitten by a vampire bat.

Ranchers, whose livelihoods are threatened, want the government to wipe out this threat. But is extermination the best course of action? Would the world be better without vampire bats? Is there anything that makes them worth saving?

Get To Know The Bloodthirsty (But Cuddly) Vampire Bat

Video: NPR’s Skunk Bear

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Hibernation helps animals like bears, bats, and even frogs survive during lean times. But resting for months at a time also leaves them vulnerable.

For famous hibernators like black bears, predators such as mountain lions can present a threat during their winter rests. A more common one, though, is humans—not because they will attack a bear, but because they can wake it up.

Whether it’s a neighbor’s car alarm or the family dog needing an early walk, no one likes being pulled out of bed earlier than planned. For hibernating animals, an early wake-up call isn’t just an inconvenience—it can be downright lethal. Waking up from hibernation requires a lot of energy, depleting reserves that are key to surviving the winter.

It’s not just bears that are in danger if they wake up from hibernation at the wrong time. In colder areas of North America, many bats species sleep through winters in caves, mines, and other large roosts, known as hibernacula.

In recent years, these populations have been devastated by a disease known as white-nose syndrome, which is caused by the fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans. The fungus itself isn’t deadly to bats, though.

“What kills the bat is that the fungus makes them wake up, which is very costly,” says Nancy Simmons, curator-in-charge in the Museum’s Department of Mammalogy whose research specialty is bats. “If they wake up too many times, it burns up all the fat they had stored for the winter.”

A version of this story originally appeared in the winter 2017 issue of Rotunda, the Member magazine.