bass-camp

10

We may lose the small battles, but win the big war.

Watch below the official trailer for Jeff Nichols’ acclaimed Loving, a drama that follows the true story of Richard and Mildred Loving (played by Joel Edgerton and Ruth Negga), an interracial couple sentenced to prison in Virginia in 1958 for getting married.

Inspired by Nancy Buirski’s documentary The Loving Story, the film will chronicle the couple’s ordeal, as they were thrown into jail, and exiled from their home state of Virginia; for the following nine years, Richard and Mildred fought for their marriage and the right to return home as a family. Their fight led to the seminal 1967 civil rights case Loving vs. Virginia, which invalidated laws prohibiting interracial marriage. 

Michael Shannon, Nick Kroll, Jon Bass, Bill Camp, and Marton Csokas co-star.

Keep reading

instagram

Grimes performing Oblivion at Pemberton Music Festival 2014.
July 18 Pemberton BC, Canada.

The third and final day of RBMA Bass Camp was a bit shorter on the studio time, which was mainly due to two lectures that took place on Saturday - one with Jan P. Muchow and a technical lecture by Seiji.

I enjoyed Jan P. Muchow’s talk very much. It was great to hear someone who works and lives with music in our geographical area. He talked about the legendary Ecstasy of St. Theresa’s John Peel Session, his film scores where the music serves the purpose of story telling - which is similar to bands, where one member serves the whole group, but also mentioned how complicated is the way how his film scores written in MIDI get rewritten into notes for the orchestra. He touched the subject of silence in music, however it seems that this topic interests Daniel Baláž much more than anyone else. Daniel also proposed that live instruments are coming back to music and how refreshing it is, but Jan dismissed this idea and said he even gets bothered by the information how the music was made - now how refreshing is to hear that! I also really liked his idea that for every song there exists someone who likes it. But the more difficult part is to make music which you will truly like.

Seiji’s tech-talk most likely didn’t go as planned, but he stayed also for the studio time afterwards, which was really beneficial. I have even played a couple of my upcoming tunes to him on which he gave comments - Seiji is super nice and helpful guy!

A couple of final thoughts. RBMA Bass Camp is a good event that should happen in Czech Rep. & Slovakia more often. It allowed me to dream that maybe one day also our countries can belong to the map (in a music sense). The connection aspect is really great and it is unbelievable to see how much energy can flow once you get so many creative and talented people together under one roof. My only regret is that I haven’t collaborated with more people, but there simply wasn’t enough time and space for that.

All in all great three days of a life, where there is only music and nothing else!