basic-structures

galaxyshoe  asked:

Not to be completely obvious but House of Cards always struck me as a 20s vibe kinda song ahahaha I have no good recs I'm sorry (but have a nice day Chels ^_^) ~Sprout

HGHHSHHH  IM SO FLATTERED HOUSE OF CARDS IS MY FAVORITE SONG AND THATS THE IDEAL VIBE I WAS GOING FOR
im just super attached to house of cards since that song is my fave bts song and such a big inspo for this au detailing (from my perspective) an unattainable dream and all the lengths each party goes thru to make it work, setting up the basic structure for this au

I was going to answer a bunch of asks together but this one gets its own

A DRAGON QUESTION. I’M FREAKING. I CAN’T. BLESS.

I really need to upload more dragons here/draw more dragons. But I will use some shitty half finished Savage and Maul dragon sketches to demonstrate.

So for me, knowing what’s underneath all the scales and horns and shit is most important. So I start with blocking out basic muscle anatomy structure:

Then I start working my way up from there. In this one I think it’s easier to see how I’m grouping by muscle shapes? Based on knowledge and anatomy reference I kind of figure out where the bones are approximately and then start building muscle groups around that.

And that’s all before you really get to the scales/skin textures and shit, which I’ve started doing here:

And tbh I’ve spent a long ass time drawing dragons. I was obsessed with dragons before I started really drawing humans so I’ve spent a while figuring this shit out and I’m still not there? But I love @neondragonart who does all the art for Flight Rising. I’ve followed them since middle school I think. And there’s @shinerai and @skysealer and @nambroth. And so many more that I can’t think of right now because it’s 6:00 am. But in all of their art I think you can see a strong habit of life drawing/reference of real animals and junk. 

Which is what I would recommend for drawing hands and feet and everything basically. Anatomy is important. This is why I draw so many naked people honestly. Feet I really find it helpful to break them up into segments and block those in first. Shoes I reference. Heavily. Fuck shoes.

Also. I still can’t draw hands. I’m convinced no one can.

scutellatebooted  asked:

Hi Doc! Love reading your blog, I found you first through the Lucifer story (reminded me of a friend of mine actually) and then again through your mermaid post and have been hanging around ever since. I looked thru your archive but didn't find this question so hopefully it hasn't been asked before: what is it about horse anatomy that makes their legs so (seemingly) fragile? You'd think being as big as they are, they'd be more all-around solid. Thanks for reading, have a good one!

The horse, Equus caballus, is one of my favorite arguments against Intelligent Design. I’ve spoken before about why I no longer see them, but even as a student I would wonder why and how this species existed when there were apparently so many things that could go wrong with its own anatomy, especially next to something tough like a trusty cow.

I don’t know how it’s possible to believe in a benevolent, loving, wise creator when creatures like the horse come to exist.

So I’m going to use your question as an excuse to write a post that had been on my mind for a while:

Things That Are Wrong With Horses

The basic structure of a horse has a few significant design flaws.

  1. Cannot vomit. This means that anything which would make another species sick enough to vomit results in a horse getting s distended stomach and colic, where the stomach can rupture and the horse can die. Also means symptoms of illness are hidden longer
  2. The large bowel (hind gut) of the horse is fricking huge, but can actually displace itself and bend around the wrong way, resulting in obstruction, colic and death without surgical intervention. This can commonly happen after exertion (splenic contraction) and giving birth. Colic due to nephrosplenic entrapment is particularly common after the horse has an adrenaline release, which causes the spleen to temporarily contract, and this seems like a poor design to risk death every time you spook or go for a fast run, especially in a species known for spooking and running fast.
  3. Giving birth is a fast and explosive affair in the horse. The whole pushing business should be over and  done with in about 20 minutes, however this assumes that everything is lined up just right for a normal delivery. Foals are all long legs and necks, which are easy to get tangled or bent around the wrong way. A mare is strong enough to push her foal’s feet through her uterine wall, which is death all round.
  4. Speaking of strength, sometimes horses will kick each other when they have attitude, and they can do so with enough strength to rupture each other’s spleens.
  5. When galloping most horses, best studied in thoroughbreds because they are made to gallop on a regular basis, horses routinely bash their diaphragm with such force against their liver that their liver bruises.
  6. Galloping also often makes their lungs bleed. That’s why racehorses have their head held up after a race, so you don’t see any blood come out their nose and disqualify them. Even horses that you don’t see bleed have evidence of pulmonary bleeding after a gallop if you scope them.
  7. Their leg bones are actually pretty damn tough, but the ends are spindly little things compared to the mass of musculature up top. Their legs are subjected to huge biomechanical forces when a horse runs which can often subject them to ligament damage and lameness. A fractured leg bone can heal like any other, but if a horse can’t bear weight evenly on all four legs for an extended period of time (eg after a fracture) then they are at risk of laminitis.
  8. Laminitis can cause the hoof to slough off. (Aaargh!) They can also get laminitis from eating a bit too well.
  9. Speaking of eating, they can also get colic (and risk death) from eating not enough fiber or the wrong sort of plants or from eating too much dirt.
  10. Oh, and just to mess with you, horses have a space in their head called a guttural pouch which seems to exist for no other reason as far as I can tell (okay, maybe it’s about heat regulation) other than to get fungal infections that eat through the exposed artery and cause the horse to die from blood loss through it’s nose.

And Bonus: Exquisite sensitivity to tetanus and vulnerability to Hendravirus

This list is by no means complete. I haven’t even touched on their anesthetics or drug reactions, but it’s a simple start.

HOW TO STUDY/LEARN ANY LANGUAGE

Being a polyglot, I decided to make a post about how to study any language, Without further ado, here it is:

1) TRY TO STAY AWAY FROM ENGLISH

This is the most crucial step to studying/learning a new language. In order for your brain to pick up the new words and ideas, it needs to be more immersed in the language you’re learning. Now for most of us who are learning languages in school, that’s kind of hard, especially since most language classes do most of the work in English until you build a level of fluency. This is the primary reason why immersion programs or immersion schools are so much more successful in teaching a language: you’re forced to talk, write, speak, and think in the language you’re learning. Your brain makes connections faster and thus learns faster to understand and process the language. I would suggest that when you’re learning the language, whether it’s in class time or homework, try to work only in that language. Don’t automatically translate things into English because that’s only going to inhibit your process. Even if your knowledge of the language is limited, practicing thinking in the language, reading the language without translating, and speaking will greatly improve your progress. You’ll find yourself become more fluent and the language will flow rather than be halting because your brain is trying to translate things instead of thinking fluently.

2) LEARN AS MUCH VOCABULARY AS YOU CAN

Vocab is one of, if not the, most important aspect of learning a language. I would even go as far as saying it’s about 70-80% of effectively knowing a language. Think about it this way, if you’re at a restaurant and you’re asked to read the menu or if you’re out and you’re reading signs and advertisements, will knowing hundreds of verbs and their conjugations help you get by? Most likely not. Vocab on the other hand will make the difference between understanding and being totally clueless. If that example didn’t do it for you here’s another one: when you’re speaking to someone how can you express yourself if you don’t know the words? Chances are even if you know no grammar but know key words in the language someone will understand you. Most people don’t pay that much attention to grammar anyway when you’re speaking. As long as you have a basic understanding of it, you’ll be understood. I’m not saying that grammar isn’t important, far from it, but so many people underestimate vocab and focus on grammar and that hinders your learning. Try to learn as much vocab as you can because it will bring you one more step to being fluent. The key to knowing a language is to understand it to a high degree. You can’t understand if you don’t know the words. Find a list with the most common words in the language you’re learning and try to learn them all. Have a goal to learn 10-20 new words per day and you’ll go a long way. If you’re trying to learn vocab I would recommend to have a sheet with all the words you’re trying to learn and their definitions. Hide the words and try to write the vocab by seeing only the definitions. Writing down helps you remember and this method is foolproof. I’ve used it for 6+ years in French and it’s never failed me.

3) LEARN BASIC GRAMMAR

When I say basic grammar, I mean the typical verb tenses and some basic structures. This doesn’t mean learning every single verb conjugated in every single tense, but rather learning the patterns of grammar and how to apply them. Work smarter not harder. Learning the patterns makes it easier to recognize them when you’re reading and remember them when you’re writing. In my opinion, one fault with the way languages are taught in school is the way they teach grammar and how much time they spend on it. Most native speakers don’t worry as much about grammar as non-native speakers do. Again, I’m not saying grammar isn’t important because it is and  you have to know it, but the way it’s taught ruins it. Try to make a chart with all the verb tenses and the patterns that go with the different types of verbs and then a list with the irregular verbs/exceptions. This should be enough to help you gain a basic mastery of grammar. If you know the basic rules, it will become second nature as you speak, write, and read more.

4) READ, LISTEN, AND SPEAK

The language you learn at school is very very different from the language actually spoken in its native country. Most of the language you learn is very formal while in real life, formality is disregarded to a degree and slang is prevalent. In order to build a fluency, you need to read and listen to the language in its natural form to pick up the slang and words that are actually used and not the archaic words that nobody ever says. Listen to music from that language, watch the news in that language, read a book or magazine in that language etc. This will again help your brain learn and process the language better. It will also help with vocabulary and general understanding. Children’s books are the best when you’re starting out. The language is simple and the grammar isn’t to complicated. Start with children’s books and then work your way up to novels and other forms of literature. Listening to the language is also crucial. Try to find mediums where the language is spoken and just listen. Don’t translate or stress yourself out trying to understand it all because you won’t the first couple of times. Just let it sink in. Gradually, you’ll find yourself understanding more and more and you’ll improve. With the speaking aspect, speak as much as you can. Don’t be embarrassed if you stumble, can’t express yourself as much as you would like, or have an accent. I also find that watching/reading/listening to translated works is helpful. Find your favorite book and read it in the language you’re learning, it will help you understand and learn more because you already know what’s going on and can focus on the vocab and grammar. Find your favorite movie and watch it in the language you’re learning. Again, it will help you learn more vocab. The more you practice the better it will get. If you distance yourself from speaking you’ll never improve. Balancing reading, listening, and speaking is the key to being successful.

5) DON’T BE AFRAID TO MESS UP

Nobody becomes fluent over night. Cliche but true. Don’t expect to instantly know everything. It’s normal to struggle and have trouble. Failing is part of the learning process and if you stop practicing because you’re afraid, you’re never going to learn anything. Let go of your fears and insecurities and go for it. If you fall down, pick yourself up and start again. Don’t be embarrassed if you mess up but rather learn from your mistakes and grow. The things we remember most are usually the things where we’ve messed up or had a negative experience with. So use the hiccups as a learning experience and your language skills will improve. 

If you follow these steps, I’m confided that you’ll be better in no time :) The key is to enjoy what you do and have fun! Good luck!

How to write a bomb ass personal statement

I’ve had a few asks about how to write - as one of you put it - a bomb ass personal statement. I’m a bit reluctant to write this, seeing as I haven’t actually got an interview/offer yet! But I guess it might be helpful to those of you applying around now :)

HOW TO START

  • Bullet point what you want to include - I suggest listing out what you want to include. It’s a good idea to do this at the beginning, to make sure you don’t leave anything out; and it can help form the basic structure of your statement.
  • Do not start at the start - this is one of the most important things I learnt when writing mine. It is so hard to write that first sentence - so just leave it until the end, and begin writing with the actual content, something you’re more comfortable writing about.
  • When you do get down to writing that first sentence - do not start with a cheesy quote or the typical “I have always bee passionate about…” as these are things that can immediately put off an admissions tutor. Try and be original, or just simple: “I want to study X because…”

THE CONTENT

  • Just keep writing - don’t worry about the 4,000 character and 47 line limits. Literally just write, and keep going, even if you think what you’re writing is bad - just get all your ideas out there, and put down everything you would want to include. It’s so much easier to take things out rather than adding things in. My personal statement was around 8,000 characters at one point!`
  • Get the balance right - different unis want different things from personal statements, so check their websites to make sure you’re getting in what they want. You need to get the balance of intellectual curiosity/passion for the subject with your personal qualities and extra-curriculars. 
  • Back up everything with evidence - don’t just say you are great at working in a team, give examples that demonstrate that you have worked well in successful teams in the past.What to include?

WHAT TO INCLUDE

  • Why you want to study that particular course
  • Why you are the right person to study the course
  • Extra things you have done to show commitment or interest about the course - volunteering, subscriptions to journals, further reading etc.
  • Any relevant work experience
  • Any relevant awards you’ve won (e.g. maths challenge or physics olympiad) or responsibilities within the school (e.g. prefect or house captain)
  • Demonstrate desirable skills for your course - problem solving, teamwork, leadership etc.

WHAT NOT TO INCLUDE

  • Cliches - like “Ever since I was born I have wanted to study…”
  • Quotes - this is a personal statement, so don’t start quoting other people! Plus way too many people do this to make it original.
  • Jokes - it may be that the person reading your statement has a very different sense of humour than you do.
  • Really long sentences - you want your personal statement to be as easy as possible to read, and long confusing sentences won’t help that.
  • Repetition - it’s such a short document, you don’t have space for this. Plus it gets boring!
  • Names of unis - the unis you apply to have no idea where else you have applied, so don’t name any of them in your statement.

THE ENDING

  • Do not end on a cheesy quote or joke. Just sum up why you’d be a great candidate and reinforce what you have told them throughout the main body of the statement - that you’re fabulous!
  • Once you have finished a draft you can start trying to cut down on the word count. Maybe ask a teacher to look at your spelling/grammar, and you can always get your friends’ opinions too, on what should come out, and what should be kept in. Make sure you don’t let other people have too much influence - it has to be a personal statement!
  • <p> <b><p></b> <b><p></b> <b></b> *The Basic Structure of a Sprousehart Interview*<p/><b>Interviewer:</b> *Asks a question*<p/><b>Cole:</b> *Lets Lili speak her mind*<p/><b>Cole:</b> *Low-key watches her the entire time with a smitten smile*<p/><b>Cole:</b> *Wholeheartedly laughs at inside jokes*<p/><b>Lili:</b> *to Cole, when he starts having too much fun at her expense* Shut...<p/><b>Lili:</b> ...Up<p/><b>Sprousehart fans:</b> *heart eyes heart eyes heart eyes*<p/></p><p/></p><p/></p>

How to Learn a Language Naturally: Back to the Basics

        Lately as I’ve been gradually getting back into independent language learning I’ve found myself struggling with where to begin. Every textbook I would take out would leave me bored and frustrated with either the simplicity or the level it was placed at relative to where I was at that time; yet without some sort of direction, I felt lost. Already battling against lack of motivation, creating a self-study program from scratch seemed like an incredibly daunting task. However, after taking a step back I’ve begun to see other approaches that I can take to learn the language in a more natural way – turning away from standard study that leaves me unmotivated, and focusing instead on fun and entertaining ways of language application. Here is what I’ve come up with.


Starting off as a beginner:

        My greatest and first word of advice for starting off as a beginner in your target language would be to start looking around websites such as Memrise and Quizlet for lists of most commonly used words. The “Learn [Language] in 200/300 words” posts on Tumblr by @funwithlanguages are also a great place to start. Start working on pronouns, general sentence structure or basic phrases, and learning the overall conjugation patterns for the most basic verbs. Flashcards and index cards are incredibly useful here. This will give you a good foundation off of which you can build further.

        In addition, having some sort of structured course, such as the Teach Yourself series or many available courses on Memrise that teach vocabulary connected with dialogues, is extremely helpful. It has been scientifically proven that a person learns vocabulary much faster when they have some sort of emotional connection formed, and by learning words in context, it is much easier to remember what something means and how it is used.

Reading/Speaking:

Find some good, easy, dual-language books to start off with. Go through them chapter by chapter, making sure to read each paragraph in only the target language before going back and looking up/checking unknown words. Read each section multiple times as to ensure comprehension, and, even better, read it to yourself out loud while working on pronunciation. Later, as you become more advanced, you can move on to books entirely in your target language, and try to write your own definitions of unknown words using the given context before checking them yourself.

Search for different news sources from countries where your target language is spoken. Read through the article and write your own summaries of events.

Try changing the language settings on your phone or social media accounts to your target language, and make note of any new vocabulary – don’t allow yourself to go on autopilot.

Challenge yourself to make short vlogs or general videos in your target language. If needed, feel free to write a script to read off of; otherwise, challenge yourself to speak purely off the top of your head – using as much as you know, even if your sentences start off broken.

Set up Skype sessions with native speakers and practice communicating using whatever knowledge of your target language you possess. If you are unsure of a word, try to use others to describe it instead of resorting to your native language (or even just ask how you would say something using your target language).

Look up the lyrics to different songs in your target language and practice translating. Similarly, try translating other songs into your target language.

Writing:

Find native speakers who would be willing to communicate with and correct you, and practice conversing using only your target language (no matter how often you need to use a dictionary – but make sure you take note of any new vocabulary or concepts you come across!).

Practice writing status updates (whether on a private account or not), journal entries, essays, or fictional pieces in your target language. If able, see if you can find a native speaker who would be willing to give you corrections, or simply post your text on Lang8!

Listening:

Youtube is a great resource for all levels of language learning. Try searching for content creators that make videos in a genre you enjoy, and utilize their channels to practice your listening skills and inferring from context while immersing yourself. Write down any words you are unsure of to look up later.

Music in your target language – listen for words you recognize, and look up those you don’t. Things like lyrics are much more likely to stick in your memory, so use that to your advantage!

Look around for an online radio that broadcasts news in your target language, or even an online news source that posts or broadcasts video.

Watch films in your target language, even if it’s content that was originally in English. Many DVDs come with dubs in other languages depending on where you’re from, and Netflix (especially Netflix Original Series) also offers many different dub and subtitle options depending on the content. Even YouTube occasionally has films or TV episodes uploaded in other languages, so long as you look hard enough.

Grammar:

When it comes to grammar, it is important to have a good, solid grammar book that breaks down all basic ideas into something that is comprehensible. Don’t start off with learning grammar right away, however; give yourself some time to really soak up the language itself and get used to basic concepts first. Once you’re at a higher level, being able to properly break down your target language and put it back together will substantially help your progression to fluency.

Incorporate practice sentences into your writing, utilizing each concept. By forcing yourself to physically use each grammatical structure in a context you’ve come up with yourself, it will be much easier for you to master each idea, as well as help it to become more natural.

Hopefully this was helpful in some way! Good luck, and happy language learning!

“The Basics”

The basic structure of the sortinghatchats system is that you aren’t just sorted into one House, but into two tiers of Houses: Primary and Secondary. Your Primary House defines WHY you do things. Your Secondary defines HOW. To build this system, we’ve drawn on the Sorting Hat’s songs, general HP canon, extracanonical data (ex. interviews with JKR)… and then extrapolated.

People are complex– for joy or for utility, due to social pressure or careless recreation, people often use the reasoning or methods of Houses that aren’t their Primary or Secondary. We call this “modelling” or “performing” a house and we will explain it in greater detail later. These additional layers help us capture some complexities in characters that we couldn’t get using Primary and Secondary alone. People can vary hugely in how they embody their Houses; in this system, Aang, the heroic pacifist protagonist from Avatar the Last Airbender, shares most of his Houses with HP’s Lord Voldemort.

The way you decide which Houses are yours is not necessarily by looking at what you do, but at what would make you proudest and most content if you were strong enough to do it. Your sorting is what you want to be and what you believe you should do, whether or not you actually live up to it. That’s how people like Peter Pettigrew can end up in Gryffindor.

PRIMARIES

Your Primary is your why. It’s your motivations, your values, and the way you frame the world around you. It’s how and what you prioritize, and what you weigh most heavily when making your decisions. People often also assume that others share those priorities. A common response to our system is “but you must oversort into Gryffindor/Slytherin/Ravenclaw/Hufflepuff–everyone has that type of morality, deep down!”

Gryffindor Primaries trust their moral intuitions and have a need and a drive to live by them. They feel what’s right in their gut, and that matters and guides them. If they don’t listen to and act on that, it feels immoral.

We call Gryffindor morality “felt” but that doesn’t mean they’re all impetuous, emotional hellions. Gryffindors can still be intelligent, deliberate creatures who weigh their decisions and moralities carefully. Reasoning, intellectualizing and debate can be support for a Gryffindor’s felt morality– but those things can never make a fully satisfying morality in themselves. Some things are just wrong, no matter what pretty words you use to explain them.

Ravenclaw Primaries have a constructed system that they test their decisions against before they feel comfortable calling something right. This system might be constructed by them, or it might have been taught to them as children, or it might have been discovered by them some point later in life. But it gives them a way to frame the world and a confidence in their ability to interact with it morally.

Ravenclaws do not lack an intuitive sense of morality or gut feeling about things, but they distrust those instincts and have a need to ignore or to dig down deep and dissect those internal moral impulses. Living within their built moral system is as important to a Ravenclaw as to a Gryffindor; it’s the source of the morality that differs between them–what they trust.

Hufflepuff Primaries value people–all people. They value community, they bond to groups (rather than solely individuals), and they make their decisions off of who is in the most need and who is the most vulnerable and who they can help. They value fairness because every person is a person and feel best when they give everyone that fair chance. Even directly wronged, a Hufflepuff will often give someone a second (or fifth) chance.

This doesn’t mean all Hufflepuffs are inherently tolerant human beings, any more than all Gryffindors are inherently good, moral creatures. Hufflepuffs tend to believe that all people deserve some type of kindness, decency, or consideration from them–but they can define “person” however they want, excluding individuals or even whole groups.

Slytherin Primaries are fiercely loyal to the people they care for most. Slytherin is the place where “you’ll make your real friends”– they prioritize individual loyalties and find their moral core in protecting and caring for the people they are closest to.

Slytherin’s reputation for ambition comes from the visibility of this promotion of the self and their important people– ambition is something you can find in all four Houses; Slytherin’s is just the one that looks most obviously selfish.

Because their morality system of “me and mine first” is fairly narrow in scope, Slytherins often construct a secondary morality system to deal with situations that are not addressed by their loyalty system.

SECONDARIES

Your Secondary is your how. It’s how you approach the world as a person interacting with it, and how you make your way. It’s how you problem-solve. It’s not necessarily what you’re best at, or even what’s the most useful to you, but about what skills and methods you value as being intrinsic to you. Do you improvise, do you plan? Do you work on something a little bit every day? Do you charge into the fray and tell people exactly what’s on your mind? What do you do? How would you describe the way you meet the world?

Note: the term “Secondary” is not meant to imply that how you do things is any less important than why (the Primary House). It’s simply the way our terminology fell out and we’re too lazy to change it. The importance of motivations v. methods is a personal sliding scale– it’s perfectly valid for a person to identify with their Secondary House over their Primary. (When drawing from canonical sources, we assumed each character likely was in a House that matched to either their Primary or their Secondary. For instance, Harry is in Gryffindor for his heroic Gryffindor Primary, but Ginny Weasley is there for her brash and bold Gryffindor Secondary.)

Gryffindor Secondaries charge. They meet the world head-on and challenge it to do its worst. Gryffindor Secondaries are honest, brash, and bold in pursuit of things they care about. Known for their bravery, it is almost a moral matter to stay true to themselves in any situation that they’re in.

Ravenclaw Secondaries plan. They collect information, they strategize. They have tools. They run hypotheticals and try to plan ahead for things that might come up. They build things (of varying degrees of practicality and actual usefulness) that they can use later– whether that’s an emergency supply pack, a vast knowledge of Renaissance artistic techniques and supplies, or a series of lists and contingency plans. They feel less at home in improvisation and more comfortable planning ahead and taking the time to be prepared.

Hufflepuff Secondaries toil. Their strength comes from their consistency and the integrity of their method. They’re our hard workers. They build habits and systems for themselves and accomplish things by keeping at them. They have a steadiness that can make them the lynchpin (though not usually the leader) of a community. While stereotyped as liking people and being kind (and this version is perhaps a common reality), a Hufflepuff secondary can also easily be a caustic, introverted misanthrope who runs on hard work alone.

Slytherin Secondaries improvise. They are the most adaptive secondary, finding their strength in responding quickly to whatever a situation throws at them. They improvise differently than the Gryffindor Secondary, far more likely to try coming at situations from different angles than to try strong-arming them. They might describe themselves as having different “faces” for different people and different situations, dropping them and being just themselves only when they’re relaxing or feel safe.

But the Journey Continues…

These four basic Primary and Secondary houses are summarized starting places that we use as a basis for further discussion. What are some ways this gets complicated?

Keep reading

snowley  asked:

I have a question- is a transformer "body" and "armor" separate or are they one piece?In movies it seemed a tranfromer has a basic body that it covers with an armor (the colorful part). In the comics or cartoon I'm not so sure but if I remember correctly in IDW comics Overlord was in some kind of tube and he was "naked", had some sort of robotic, thin body. So is the "armor" - the rest of the transformer - just like clothes or more like a bioarmor they can feel? Is this referenced anywhere?

As ever, such things tend to vary by continuity. There’s plenty of examples of a bit of a Transformer being removed, and all that’s revealed beneath is a basic mechanical skeletal structure of struts and wires that’s you couldn’t believe is ever supposed to be “exposed” at any time. In instances like these, human analogies aren’t perfect, but its probably best to think of a Transformer’s armor, or exoskeleton, as their “skin” which goes over their “skeleton” - not something, generally speaking, that they’re supposed to “take off.” Take a look at what’s going on inside Ironhide’s forearm, for instance:

Or these shots of a damaged Megatron from the Marvel comic - you can see there’s no “head” underneath his “helmet,” just internal robotic matter.

Protoforms from Beast Wars suggest something similar - a basic endoskeleton existed at the core of a protoform, but the substance of its outer body, well beyond simple armor, is formed from living liquid metal.  The protoforms seen in Transformers: Prime also follow this course - they formatted from featureless mannequins into exact replicas of Starscream, armor and all, all formed from the same living metal as if they were one body.

But you’re quite correct in also recalling an un-armored Overlord in the IDW comics, whose external armor was removed so his endoskeleton could be fused with indestructible ununtrium:

And even Transformers: Animated showed us that certain external parts of a Transformers body were armor that could be harmlessly and painlessly removed like “clothing” - witness helmet-less Bumblebee:

We would later seen that, although protoforms can be brought to life and given form, as seen here with Yoketron:

…in order to be “complete,” rather than this minimalist look, a protoform would have to be placed in a pre-existing “mold” that included certain key parts of the armour, into which it would then grow, filling out the rest of the body (this, then, explains shared body types among robots).

You raise the subject of movie ‘bots, and per the details given in the Transformers: The Movie Guide book, they seem to rather split the difference between these two ideas. For them, the protoform is the core body of the Transformer, but it generates the robot’s external armor (in accordance with the shape and colour, etc, of the alt mode) from both its own mass, and from any additional matter it can absorb and reformat into living metal.

Similar to that. the Transformers: Shattered Glass prose story “Blitzwing Bop” has noted that Cybertronian technomatter can accept replacement parts and repairs made using conventional metals, plastics, and circuits, because a Transformer’s biology is such that it will break down any such matter and convert it into living metal. It also feels like IDW concept of a spark’s “animating force" factors in here - that’s something that’s only come up in regards to Ultra Magnus, and his spark’s rare ability to animate the very large suit of armor that surrounds his body, but it makes it seems that we can’t think of it just as something that a Transformer “wears,” but something that is genuinely part of them, animated by their lifeforce

⛤🔮EMOJI SPELLS 101⛧🌿🕯

“likes charge, reblogs to cast”

emoji spells very similar in design to sigils, in that they are the combination of common symbols and shapes to construct an intent. at the basic core of all spellwork, everything is symbolic. a strawberry can represent love, a heart, or even a tongue. nails in a curse can represent illness and the sharp potential and hurt of nails, not necessarily the strict idea of being a pointy metal thing. together in a spell, i’m cursing someone’s heart, love, tongue, whatever. but those same symbols are present in a heart emoji and a knife emoji. the emotions and ideas they convey are just a new casing for symbols that have been with us for centuries.

construction of an emoji spell

make sure you express all ideas of your intent in the spell. if you want to banish worries, don’t only include emoji’s for banishing! the worry component also has to be present.

magic symbols to power the spell

often emojis spells are bookended or centered around a symbol that indicates magic, to mark them as different than any string of emojis.  

some symbols: ⛤⛥⛦⛧🌿🕸🕯💫🌌🔮

two basic structures: symmetrical or linear!

symmetrical can be used to express a general idea, inviting prosperity, love, jobs, etc. for linear you can use arrows and such to indicate a change, a removal of something and what it’s replaced with. 

dating stuart twombly would include...

Masterlist 

  • Meeting somewhere cute and quaint like the local coffee house or the bookstore
  • Him looking up from his phone one day and deciding he wanted to talk to you
  • Eventually falling head over heels in love with him
  • Texting him when he isn’t paying attention to you or when you think he’s not listening
  • Him leaving you on read 
  • “You know I can see you reading these right?”
  • Being the only person that can call him Stewie
  • Soft, tender forehead kisses all the time 

Keep reading

hyperbravedubs  asked:

I've been hesitant to ask anything here but, I've been struggling when it comes to drawing and coloring. I'm not sure how to get better. I've asked for tips many times and well just practice is all I get. Heh. I'm really trying. I'd just like some way of helping myself. Is there a way too?

Hmm. Okay, this is going to be a LOOOOOOONG POST. 

I don’t know how much advise I can offer but I will tell you what helps me, and how I colour. I’ll break it down into sections. XD 

Drawing

I very much recommend live drawing. Particularly for anatomy. Live drawing helps you learn the basic structures of the human body. How the skin folds, how joints bend and move, how to gain perspective. It trains your brain and makes you able to draw a lot better, a lot faster and more accurately.

With anatomical drawing: Do break it down into shapes and lines. Shapes and lines are your friends in drawing.

Like, the shape of the basic human ribcage can be described like a shape of an egg. Artists like Leonardo De Vinci broke down the anatomical forms of the human body into basic shapes.

Lines helps you gain movement into the body. They, along with shapes, are you basic frame for anatomical drawing.

Don’t be afraid of failure or mistakes. If a drawing failures or has mistakes, then it’s something you’ve learnt. You can then apply what you know now from your to a new drawing.

Drawing Style

Drawing style does very from person to person. But looking at comic artists styles can be a great source of inspiration. And maybe mix styles up.

I’d say my style is like a combination of Naruto and Deadman Wonderland.

With time, drawing style does develop and it does. Like, mine has changes so much within a year.

This one was made on the 5th of January 2016. 


And then there’s this one:

 This was made on the 6th of January 2017. 

They may be subtle changes, but anatomically speaking, it’s a lot better than last year. 


Colouring 

Let’s use a visual example to explain this: 

Colouring is really dependent on the style of the artist. For any tips with digital colouring, always have separate layers from your base colour and your shading.


As you can see, I love layers. I am very thankful for them. And use a lot of them. 

So I always start with a layer for  base colours:

Shading

 For my shading style, I prefer to use cell shading, so sharp lines and blocked colours to represent tone. However, instead of using a black colour as my shading, I think about what colours would be suitable for the setting and lighting of a scene. So, say the lighting or scene was more pigment with reds and oranges, then I’d want the same colours for my shading (and highlighting). 

The darkest red in the top right side is my shading colour, whilst the two on the two of the left (the lighter coloured reds) are more to be used for highlighting. 

 When setting my layers, I set them to “Multiply”, and turn the opacity to about 50-70%.  Up to you.

I usually make two layers of shading, one for the main and primary shading:

And another for secondary: 


And one other layer for highlights. For highlighting, I set the layers settings to “add” or “add (glow)”. Some programs may call it something else, like Sai calls it “luminosity”.

It may not seem much, but it definitely brightens up the eyes and the shine of the metal neck (brace?). 

It just gives your character more dimension and lil’ touch of realism. Whether you decide to have soft or cell shading is up to you. 

Once you’ve feel happy with it, you can always add any extra effects. 

So, usually to brighten up the colours and the character, I use similar colours on a separate layer, and set that layers setting to “overlay”. Again, set that to around 50-60%. But it’s up to you.

And for effects like the magic, I use the “add (glow)” layer setting again. For colour, I use the most vibrant red on my colour pallet. So the one on the top left.

Now, something that my lovely friend Cross taught me. When I know I’ve finished everything, but want to give it a bit more “oomph”, then I make a duplicate of the completed drawing, use a “gaussain blur” and set the opacity to about 60-80%.  Once that’s done, I go to edit and use a “colour balance” effect. 

Giving me this result. It just gives the drawing more charisma and “badassery”. 

How you shade and colour is entirely up to you. It is a practice thing, but it doesn’t hurt to experiment with other techniques. 

I’m not very skilled when it comes to soft shading, with the exception of some architectural backgrounds (sometimes). But I can definitely see the appeal.

 Say @kiacii for example, rather than cell shading, she uses soft shading that almost has a sharp edge. She uses SAI and the ’shade’ setting of her layer. And her drawing and colouring style is stunning. With just subtle changes in colour and layer settings, it really makes her work come to life. Which is one of the reasons I hold her so highly. 

Brushes:

 Brush type is really up to you and which you feel most comfortable with. Or experiment. 

Traditional work: 

I really can’t do traditional comics. So instead I save the comics for digital, and use traditional mediums like oil paints, acrylics, watercolours,  inks etc. for traditional life painting. 

One of my artist studies on Melanie Rothman’s paintings. 

Pencil portrait of my friend from school.

It seriously takes practice and patience. But you can do it :D I hope this helps xDD 

anonymous asked:

Do you have any writing or dos/donts tips for new fanfiction writers??


I’m just gonna start this out by saying i’m so honored that you asked me this especially since i’ve only been writing for less than a year whoops but anyway… Buckle up.

  • Proper grammar is very important
    • While it might be easier to type how you text and message people, basic sentence structure is important in a. Making your writing legible and b. Making it flow well
    • Use commas, just be careful how you use them
      • If what your saying can be said as an aside, chances are you’re going to use a comma or a hyphen
      • COMMAS ARE NOT USED SIMILAR TO THE PAUSE POINTS WHEN YOU SPEAK GET THAT OUT OF YOUR HEAD RIGHT NOW
      • Yes sometimes, commas and speaking pause points line up, but it’s not always
    • Use sentence length to set the mood
      • Longer sentences slow the reader down, so using FANBOYS or semicolons can really help to create a calm mood
      • Shorter sentences make the reader read faster, so you can use it to show anxiety or fast paced thoughts or actions
  • Make grammar your bitch
    • Proper grammar is important, but misusing grammar can be extremely helpful in setting the mood
    • For example: run on sentences, bad grammar, but if you use them, it shows that the character is having one long, trailing thought and possible anxiety depending on how the run on is structured
    • Also, not everyone talks properly. Not everyone says “I’m going to go read.” In fact, most native English speakers say “I’m gonna go read.” Learn how the character speaks, and use that.
  • If you’re going to use google docs (cause lbr not everyone can afford Word) get the grammarly extension on chrome, it’s like your own personal beta
  • PLAN
    • Know where you want your fic to go and make notes
    • If it’s a longer fic, write out a timeline, get your thoughts down and in order, it’ll save time as you write it out as well as prevent forgetting any plot points
    • Write down what the characters are like at the start of the fic and then at the end of the fic. Longer fics should have some sort of change and growth
    • However, if you’re going to write a shorter fic, this doesn’t always apply. Some shorter fics are specifically written just to show one point in a character’s life or characters lives and therefore there might not be much growth
  • Stay open to ideas
    • Sometimes your writing is going to take you in a different direction than planned. That’s okay.
    • If you don’t like where it’s going, DON’T DELETE THE SECTION, instead, move it somewhere else, i.e. a new doc, and start from where it started to veer off it’s path
  • DON’T COMPARE YOURSELF TO OTHER WRITERS; THIS WILL BE YOUR DOWNFALL
    • First, everyone has their own way of writing, don’t try and mimic it, or your writing won’t feel genuine to you or your reader
    • Second, there is always going to be someone better than you. Always. The more you compare yourself, the harsher you’ll get on yourself, and the less you’ll like writing
    • Third, everyone has to start somewhere. You will post bad fic. I have. Everyone has. It’s how you start, and it’s how you get feedback and grow. Don’t be ashamed of it
    • Fourth, you are never done growing. You will always be learning new ways to write, new ways to better express feelings and thoughts
  • Body language
    • Body language is a solid 60% of conversations, whether you notice it or not
    • People can actively hid something in their voice from you, but it’s harder to do so with their body, as so much of what we do is subconscious
    • Learn what your character’s tells are: when they’re lying, annoyed, happy, frustrated, upset, etc. Also, using general tells are pretty good, too. Quite a few people tend to look to the left when they lie, or cross their arms when they’re being defensive.
  • Showing is better than telling
    • Through body language, thoughts, and actions, you can show a character’s feelings a whole lot better than outrightly saying it.
    • This doesn’t mean never tell, but when you do it all the time, the story gets kinda boring
  • Find your audience
    • You want to hit moms in their forties? Write like a realistic, romance author
    • Wanna hit teens? Write about more fantasy and science fiction, hitting romance while still developing characters as they grow and age
  • Reach out to others in the fandom
    • talk with people, make friends, come up with headcanons together
    • encourage them and they will encourage you
    • having people to talk to about things is honestly so important and the entire reason i’ve been able to keep writing as well as the reason why i stopped for months before i started writing for voltron
  • Find how you relate to characters. Don’t make them you, but use how you understand yourself to write them. It’s how I write anxiety, depression, adhd, and anger disorders
  • Have fun when you write
    • Talk with friends who enjoy what you’re writing about, share little snippets, get people excited or make them cry
    • Get yourself excited about making people squeal because of tooth-rotting fluff, or have their heart melt with heavy angst
  • Read other’s works
    • Learn what you like and what you don’t, what others like and what they don’t
    • See what works when it comes to imagery and what’s better to just say
    • But oh my god, don’t ever steal. You’re writing should always be your own. You can take inspiration from other people, but when you steal their work it’s unbelievably rude and is extremely upsetting to the author, plus it’s against literally every sites rules and copyrights, and don’t copy their writing style, it just doesn’t work
  • One thing I do, that I honestly wish I didn’t, but is at least helpful for me
    • I always get in the mindset of the character, i.e. if Keith’s upset, I get myself upset and then write, or if Lance is super enthused, I get myself really happy
    • This can be really exhausting and taxing at times, so do this at your own risk
  • Music can completely change how you write
    • Find or make a playlist that has the mood for how you want to write something
    • Be aware of how the song is affecting your writing, and change it if you need to
  • When the characters are talking, try to hear their voices in your head and channel that when you write
    • If you listen to the character’s speaking what you want them to say, it becomes easier for the reader to hear that as well
    • It makes the characters a lot more believable
  • Relationships aren’t black and white
    • there’s cutesy little things, fights/arguments, sex (if you write that) and so much more
    • think about how you interact with your friends. how you sometimes get frustrated with them and just need to be alone, or how easy it can be to talk with them and spend time with them and how sometimes it can be a mix of the two. it’s a lot like that just with romance and kisses
    • no two relationships are the same. keith and lance don’t have the same dynamic as shiro and allura. hunk and lance don’t have the same dynamic as hunk and keith. everything and everyone is different and compliment each other in different ways. 

I think this is it and i’m sorry with how long this is, but this is everything that i’ve learned/have helped me over the past 10 months. I hope they help you too!!!

  • what she says: i'm fine
  • what she means: in the first episode of season two of rick and morty summer says there's mildew growing on jerry and beth but if time has been frozen for the last six months not only would mildew be unable to grow because growth requires the passage of time but there would be no point in vacuuming jerry and beth in the first place because dirt can't accumulate without time passing so either they were wasting their time with cleaning them and summer was lying about the mildew or the device rick used to freeze time only worked on things that had above some minimum number of atoms and if that's the case that means that single-cell organisms and other basic structures exist on a slightly separate plane from the rest of the universe

Hey @safestsephiroth :)

I first created this outlining method to use with short stories, but it’s translated decently well over to longer works (where each row is either a chapter or an “act”)

It definitely works for me, but you might find that you need to tweak it to work for you

The basic structure is Character - Problem - Importance - Obstacles - Attempts (1-3) - Climax - Denouement

Character: You can use this to list all the characters in a chapter/act/arc/short story, and/or who the POV character is. This is especially useful in stories with large casts

Problem: What is the driving need for this chapter/act/etc.? You can, if you want, also include the theme of the story here, but I find that in my own stories, the problems that the characters have are separate from the theme

Importance: This is basically the character motivation for dealing with the problem (rather than running away/ignoring it)

Obstacles: I use bullet points here to list the people, things, and abstracts that make solving the problem more difficult

Attempts: I personally find that more than 3 attempts by a character to solve a particular problem is boring, so that’s where the (1-3) comes in. This is just a quick bullet point list of the actions the character(s) take to try to solve the problem. The final attempt always ties in to the next column…

Climax: This is just a quick sentence or two about the climax of the chapter/arc/etc. It expands on the final attempt, if needed, or summarizes the results of the final attempt

Denouement: Not every chapter/arc/etc. needs to have a denouement, but it can be helpful, especially if the climax was particularly tense and/or action-packed to have a scene or two where the tension can be unwound. Where there is no denouement, I use this space to more fully detail the outcome /ending of the climax

So that’s the outlining method I use! (I just made the chart in MS Word)

4

1 / 2 / 3 / 4 / 5 / 6 / 7 / 8 / 9


Past Lena was a dick.  That was all she could say right now.  The early morning sun was blasting through the opened curtains that she’d been far too preoccupied to close the night before.  She growled, burying her face in Kara’s hair in an attempt to ward off her hangover.  

Kara let out a soft whine, dragging Lena in close.  “Stop moving.”

 “Don’t tell me what to do Danvers…”

Lena watched one of Kara’s blue eyes open and fixate on her, “If you know what’s good for you, you’ll revoke that.”

Keep reading

Science and Witchcraft are not enemies
  • A scientist will tell you that our cells are powered by combustion reactions. Combustion is just another word for the reactions involved in Fire.
  • A scientist will explain that your blood is the same salinity as the oceans were 3.6 billion years ago, when living creatures first incorporated circulated Water into their basic structure - the precursors of blood.
  • A scientist might teach you about the millions of tiny chambers in our lungs called alveolar sacs that inflate and deflate every time we breathe, allowing our blood to mix with Air to feed our cells.
  • A scientist could tell you about the many minerals and metals that make up our bodies, from the metal in our bones to the phosphorus in our DNA, constructing our bodies out of Earth.


Our bodies are made of Earth, Air, Fire, Water and Spirit - the Elements of Magick

They’re also made of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorous, sulphur, iron, chlorine, potassium, sodium, and a million other elements and compounds - the Elements of Science


The Elements of Science and the Elements of Magick are not mutually exclusive. 

Science and Witchcraft are not mutually exclusive.


You can be a scientifically-minded Witch, or a Witchcraft-practicing scientist, or anything in between. Your magick does not have to conflict with your science, and your Elements of Magick can be the same as your Elements of Science. 

Illuminate the worlds of science and Witchery with your knowledge and your light. Let yourself shine, a beacon of bright knowledge and wisdom in the night of ignorance and fear.


– Juniper WildWalk

I was watching an interview with Rachel Bloom recently about how they wrote “I’m Going On a Date with Josh’s Friend!” and Rachel was saying how she was relying on this clean, mathematical way of writing that she’d learned. In the “clean” way of writing, Rebecca would’ve had a great time with Greg and then sabotaged the date because she’s afraid of happiness. 

But Aline Brosh Mckenna, who has been screenwriting for a long time now and is very good at what she does, said that didn’t work because Rebecca wasn’t afraid of being happy, but rather growing up and being brought down from the clouds. Rachel was a little nervous, but she trusted Aline and we got the episode we have today.

And I realized this is something that they do a lot. Initially, watching Crazy Ex Girlfriend can be almost uncomfortable, and you’re not sure why. But knowing this, I see that it’s because they often stray from the mathematical, clean story structure and instead go with what actually makes sense for the character.

When you’re someone who has watched a lot of TV you learn the basic structure and format of an episode, especially with comedy series. So when a show ignores that basic, expected structure you can sense it. And because you’re used to it, this is sort of unsettling. 

While I think this is one of the many things that makes Crazy Ex Girlfriend one of the most unique and well made shows on television in recent history, I think it may also be part of the reason why its ratings are so low. A lot of people don’t want to be challenged. They want to be given a simple A+B=C story that has a clear structure and lesson.

But Crazy Ex Girlfriend, in all its genius, is never going to make it that easy on you. They want you to think. They want you to see the nuance in the situation. If you ever feel like the lesson to be learned from an episode is simple and clear, you probably need to think about it a little more. Rachel and Aline want you to question the content. This is a show where nothing is to be taken at face value. 

And I think that is absolutely genius. True fans of television need a show like this. A show to keep them guessing, keep them thinking and questioning. I wish more people realized that and gave Crazy Ex Girlfriend more than a shot- but the critical thinking it not only deserves, but requires.