basic blues

2

she’s in a long black coat tonight,
waiting for me in the downpour outside
( x )

Blue and Red Symbolism in “The Prince of Egypt”

One of the cool overarching artistic themes in “The Prince of Egypt” is blue versus red. It doesn’t work 100% of the time - for instance, Zipporah’s clothing is blue, but she’s not associated with the Egyptians - but overall, blue and red have their own distinct, separate symbolism. Blue represents Egypt, while red is the color of Moses’ family, the Hebrews, and their God Elohim. 

Now I’m going to quickly rush from start to end of the film and point out the major blue and red moments I’ve noticed.

The opening shot is red, while the musical theme for God is playing in the background.

The Hebrew infants are being slaughtered, and the color of the streets is amazingly red. The Egyptian guards themselves, however, are carrying blue shields - the only blue in these frames.

Jochebed, Aaron, and Miriam are all wearing red. Even the baby Moses is wrapped in a red blanket. Jochebed is also wearing blue; she’s making a choice based upon the dangers of Egyptian society.

All the Egyptians are wearing blue. Rameses II even has a blue tie around his ponytail and a blue necklace. The entire tint of this moment is basically blue… blues and purples. It’s a huge visual contrast from the baked, bloody red from which baby Moses has escaped.

Blues, blues, blues everywhere. The headdress of the Pharaoh on the statue is blue. Later, painted murals of the Pharaoh will show the same blue.

The next shot, we see Moses and Rameses as young adults. Moses is still sticking with the red theme, which cues viewers subtly that he’s out of place in Egyptian society. Moses’ horses are decorated in red, so is his chariot, and so are accents of his clothing. Rameses, meanwhile, perfect little Egyptian boy that he is, has all that in blue and aqua.

Tuya wears blue around the collars, the Pharaoh Seti’s cane is aqua blue, and the priests are wearing the same bluish accents. Rameses II is, as I mentioned before, wearing the same color. In fact, everyone in this room has the same shade of blue on except for Moses.

If we really want to go crazy overanalyzing, even the punch bowl that Moses dumps on Hotep and Huy is red.

Egyptian magic is blue.

So is the ring that Rameses gives Moses. Now this ring is symbolic. While Moses wears it, he has a connection to his Egyptian family, his Egyptian brother. When he returns to Egypt to ask the Pharaoh to let the Hebrew slaves go, he returns the ring. He is revoking his kinship and connections with the Egyptians at this moment. He’s revoking the blue.

There is a deep blue tint during the night scene Moses meets Miriam and Aaron and first learns he’s actually Hebrew by birth. Moses’ mind is concerned with the fact he’s blue - an Egyptian - even though that’s not the truth. Oh, right, and all three siblings - Moses, Miriam, and Aaron - are wearing red.

While Moses struggles with the shocking news he’s actually a Hebrew, he runs into his Egyptian home. The places where he stands to comfort himself are blue, blue, blue everywhere. He wants to think that this is where he belongs - in this comforting Egyptian blue.

But then you get to Moses’ bedroom, and you realize it’s red. He’s a Hebrew at heart, deep beneath it all. He just doesn’t realize it yet.

After Moses enters Midian, Jethro gives him a red cloak. 

And it is to note that Jethro, while a Midianite rather than a Hebrew, is the one who speaks to Moses about looking at life through Heaven’s eyes. This helps pave the way for Moses to become acquainted and receptive to the Hebrew God Elohim. Jethro wears red. Even the tent he lives in is red. It’s all red.

When Moses sees the burning bush, at first the atmosphere is blue. His cloak and the bush are the only things with reddish tinges on them.

The colors which wrap around him, though, are a bit more red than blue.

Excited Moses tells the news he’s going to deliver the Hebrews in a red tent.

Rameses’ royal chambers in Egypt are very blue. Moses, wearing red, sticks out from the rest of the people and things in the room.

Hey, look, more blue Egyptian magic. There is some stark red in this scene, too. Blue generally predominates, and all the time conjurations happen, it’s with blue (or greens, at least) as the main color.

The biggest exception is the fact that the Egyptians pull out red snakes. It’s almost as though to hint those snakes are going to be eaten by Moses’.

I want to point out that, of the three siblings, only Miriam wears complete red. Moses also is wearing a greenish, tealish undershirt, while Aaron’s shorts are blue-green. It’s as if to point out that Moses has to struggle through both sides, while Aaron is someone whose mind isn’t deep on faith, and gets too caught up in the worries of current Egyptian society. Miriam, the great woman of endless faith, is the one who wears the complete red associated with God.

The ideal place to relax for the Pharaoh and his son is in a rather blue boat.

Moses drowns out that blue and replaces it with the red of blood, directly with God’s power.

However, the Pharaoh has not relented. He won’t let the Hebrews go. And before the plagues begin, the Egyptian world is still overall blue in tint.

Not so much once the plagues hit and turn the whole world red.

And if you still don’t believe in the red versus blue symbolism, check out this screenshot below. Moses and Rameses II are shown facing one another in opposition. Rameses, blue. Moses, red. The two figureheads for Egypt and Israel, coming in conflict, depicting these two thematic, symbolic colors. 

The doors are painted with the blood of lambs to protect Hebrews from the angel of death.

But there is death amongst the Egyptians, and a foreboding - depressing - blue ambience within that dark. Moses leaves Rameses II enshrouded in blue. It’s so blue you can’t even see the red on Moses’ cloak.

Rameses returns to attack the Hebrews in blue. It’s the most blue he’s ever worn, in fact.

But God returns. He comes as a pillar of flame - a bright, red, magnificent red pillar of flame. And when the Hebrews travel through the Red Sea, they light flames themselves, bringing some sparks of red into the blue passageway.

As I said before, the blue versus red symbolism isn’t perfect. There are times that it diverges, or that blue is simply blue and red is simply red. However, I think there is still a strong correlation between red associating with the Hebrews and blue with the Egyptians. The artwork is beautiful in and of itself, but the fact that the color pallet seems to be so symbolically intentional gives me a whole other level of respect for the creators of this movie.

anonymous asked:

U actually made me curious about who nick cave is so ill inmerse myself now ty grandin

IVE BEEN WAITING FOR THIS DAY, WELCOME DARLIN

“It’s Over, Isn’t It” Is the most eloquent and breath-taking scene in Steven Universe in so many ways!


The Song

The first thing spectacular about the scene is obviously the song! It has no defined tempo, like pearl is rambling to herself through rhyme and melody. The lyrics fluent and clear in reference to her past experiences (Ones we’ve both seen and have yet to see) Especially in that break down where she blurts out phrases referring to concepts circulating her love for Rose Quartz. When that second round of the chorus kicks in and Pearl throws that damn rose in the air I almost teared up while watching the episode in a public place.

The emotion is real and infectious.

On further analysis of the song, It is revealed (Or at least solidified) that Rose has been with Plenty of Men, but they weren’t impactful enough to deter Pearl’s affections. Actually, the fact that pearl specifically said “Men” and not people in general could lead you to believe Rose had a preference for male humans and Pearl was in denial about it the whole time. Making her tale even more tragic and probably pretty relatable to quite few people. Pearl may have never had a chance with Rose… now I’m sad…

The Storyboarding and Animation

the shots and key frames are so dynamic and compliment this masterpiece of a scene. The show has it’s moments of fantastic animation but there are legit moments where there is only motion, like when pearl has that slow pan around her.

^ This part, watch it again, there is no still frame. and that’s not where the fantastic animation stops. It’s throughout the whole scene. The animation is fluid, clean, polished, who knows if there are even any errors in it.

Tell me this isn’t oozing with elegance and fluid motion!?!? Compared to the rest of the episode, the animation is the most consistent with how amazing it looks.

Ahh it was boarded by Joe and Jeff, no wonder pearl is so cute!

This is some inspiring stuff, I’m not even exaggerating saying this is the scene that has the best flow of the entire show, and it being a musical number makes that 10x better. 

The colors are also super pretty, shades of purple, pinks, blues, basically cool colors because, of course, it’s the evening.

Sorry to make such a long post, I just really wanted to gush about this scene, I’ve rewatched it so many times my friend @artsyjerk got pissed at me XD
Personally it’s my favorite song and favorite scene of the whole show, and It isn’t just hype, it’s lyrics are super important to pearl’s arch overall and the production value of the art and animation is so inspiring to me, someone who hopes to make things this beautiful in the future of Cartoon Programming.

cursed au

Minions trying to make the Director their boss. He sends Tex out to kill them. They try to make Tex their boss. 

Eventually they settle with making Meta their boss, and Sigma sends them to kill Wash. Eventually, they discover that Sigma is irritated af with them, and want them dead, so they end up collaborating with Wash, and now Wash has an army of irritating child-like beans who would do anything for him and adore him and he’s stuck with them now.

…He refuses to give them goodnight kisses. They get hugs instead, but only begrudgingly.

Title: A Fine Point
Chapter: 1/1
Words: 1,057 words
Relationship: Clarus Amicitia/Regis Lucis Caelum
Summary: Throughout his years, Regis has a habit of collecting pens. Read on AO3. Part 10 of We Loved and Loved

Regis had a habit of collecting pens from places he had been to long ago. It all started as he set out of Insomnia and traveled towards Lestallum with his companions as their first major stop. Passing through the winding bumpy roads and taking a break at rest areas to gather supplies and information, Regis bought pens from the small stores he visited, whether they were regular black tube ones or the ones with a little chocobo or malboro creature on top as decor.

Keep reading

anonymous asked:

Oh and Joe tackling and taking both Bill and Babe down for being dumbasses is THE BEST! Are there any more toothbrush one shots coming?

I’m on tumblr mobile so sorry if any of this gets jumbled, I’m not used to answering anons in general, even more so via on the go!!!

Ahhh, okay!

Bill and Babe are the best little shits to ever little shit and in my head they’re basically the Blues Brothers they’re that iconic of a duo to me.

And please don’t ask how I came up with that grocery store scene because I have no clue. It just happened. It was like one something in the morning, I should have been in bed to get up for work, I was instead melting in my underwear in front of a box fan because it was so fucking hot and humid outside.

I feel like that’s the point it got a little crackish, but c'set la vie!

As for your second point about more in the toothbrush verse: uhhhh, well, I don’t know????

The Chuck/Ron fic I posted on AO3 was originally supposed to be part 5 of the “maybe you don’t have to rush” series, but it kind of got away from me and may turn into a verse of its own.

I might try again for a Chuck/Ron part in the toothbrush verse, but I don’t know because there’s already the speirton one??? Would that be weird to have another one with Ron with someone else? If people would want it I’d see what I can do!

I’ve also briefly thought about throwing in a Brad/Ray part since they were my first ever HBO War Fandom ship (Gen. Kill being the first thing ever I watched!) Again, if it’s something people would want then I’d maybe attempt it???

In a past life I’d probably add in a bit here about opening myself up to suggestions or prompts, but I’m admittedly very limited in what characters I feel capable of writing. This little toothbrush verse here was basically me testing the waters to see who all I could manage, which fortunately hasn’t ended too badly for me, thank god!

I really admire the writers on here who can just whip out stuff for ships I’ve never even thought about it and make them seem so natural, like. What the fuck guys?!

With that being said, I’m happy with what I’ve got now but I definitely wouldn’t rule out adding some more to the toothbrush verse just to see it grow!

Thanks so much for reading and taking the time to drop an ask, sorry you got this fucking essay as a response!!!

Cheers, friend!!!!!

Vans Girls’ Catskills Moto Diaries: What’s in Brittany’s Pack?

Brittany Wood is a 27-year-old Angeleno with a lust for life, and a hunger for Takis and energy drinks. By day she works in the social media department at Vans while blogging for Vans Girls, by night you can find her rolling around on her bike in search of soft-serve ice cream and burritos. 

Find out what Brittany is packing for Babes Ride Out East Coast, and keep your eyes peeled for the full recap of hers and Genevieve’s moto journey through the Catskills…

Keep reading

Andrew Farriss talks Kick track by track

Guns In The Sky

“Michael wrote this one. It started off as a demo that we cut in Hong Kong. I helped him program the drum parts on a Roland 707 that I had. He had a very clear idea of how he wanted the song to go, which I totally respected.

“We brought the demo back to Sydney, played it for the other guys, and they all loved it. Tim does an amazing guitar solo – it’s so harsh and biting. Everybody else really dug in and made the tune rock pretty hard. It’s like hip-hop and heavy metal in spots.

“Michael’s vocal is so important to how the song works. There isn’t a trace of irony or glibness to what he’s saying. It’s no bullshit.”

New Sensation

“This is part of the first batch of songs that Michael and I wrote for Kick. It started out with a blues feel, and the demo had a funky drum box pattern. Even now, the verse moves along in a typical blues pattern, but when it gets to the chorus it gets kind of strange.

“The notes, the whole feel, it’s definitely weird and quirky. I love Kirk’s sax playing, Jon’s drumming is amazing, and Garry’s doing incredible things on the bass – the whole band is so solid. They really took hold of a song that doesn’t make any sense at all.

“It still amazes me to see audiences going crazy to it. Really, I think New Sensation is such a odd song to have been a hit. We definitely did something right with it.”

Devil Inside

“It’s a pretty strong riff. We were on tour, and the band was staying at a hotel in Edgewater Road in London. That’s where I wrote the riff – I put it on a demo in my room. I worked out the chords, played everything for Michael, and he said, ‘That’s really good. Let’s run with it.’

“The band did a phenomenal job on it. It’s still a cracker of a song to play live, because what you hear on the record is just that – the group is performing together in the studio. There’s some overdubs, but not as many as you might think.

“I give a lot of credit to Chris Thomas for preserving that live feel. It’s a funny thing. If you know the right parts, you can pretty much play this song, and the whole of the Kick album, as a bar band. You don’t need an orchestra, you don’t need 24 tracks of backing tapes – if you know the song, you can do it.”

Need You Tonight

“Another weird, quirky song. I demoed it at home in Sydney while a cab waited outside to take me to the airport. Why I thought it was so important, I couldn’t tell you. It was this little thing that I worked on with my eight-track, and I bounced it down to a cassette recording.

“I made the plane with just minutes to spare and flew to Hong Kong, where Michael and I were working on some ideas. He loved what I played him and said, ‘Give me a pad and a pen.’ He sat down and wrote the lyrics in something like an hour. The engineer put a mic up, and while Michael sang right there, I replayed the parts, with the drum machine, onto a 24-track, two-inch analog tape. That’s pretty much what you’re hearing.”

Mediate

“It has the same Roland 707 drum machine that I used to program the part for Need You Tonight. I hadn’t touched the beats per minute knob at all. And when I say ‘knob,’ that shows you how old school it was. It was way before the heavily quantized, locked-in and gridded beats per minute thing; everything had a variable air about it. It wasn’t synced perfectly. There was a drifting quality to it.

“It never occurred to me that the two songs, Need You Tonight and Mediate, could share the same beats – that was Chris Thomas’ idea.

“Michael and I wrote everything together but two songs: he wrote Guns In The Sky on his own, and I did Mediate by myself. What I wanted to create was a Brian Eno-type landscape with keyboards, one which was very emotive and gentle, against a hard funk beat.

“Michael’s vocal is like some sort of New Age rapping. It’s surreal. At the time, it must have turned people’s heads. I remember hearing it in a club in Houston, and I have to say, I thought to myself, Wow… this is pretty interesting. I didn’t have anything to compare it to.”

The Loved One

“It was written by some of the guys in an Australian blues band from the 1960s called The Loved Ones. We always loved it. It was my brother Tim’s idea to record our own version of it, just a balls-to-the-wall blues-rock track, and not be forgiving about it.

“It has a very important place on Kick in that it balances out the experimentation, us messing around with technology and trying to forge our way into the future. At the same time, it’s our tip of the hat to our rock and blues influences. I’ve got Tim to thank for that.”

Wild Life

“I don’t exactly know why we wound up zeroing in on this one. There were other songs that didn’t make the Kick album that might have been equally as good – it’s hard to say. What I do like about it are Michael’s vocals and the groove – it swings along in its own way and does things that typical pop songs don’t.

“It’s another good example of what we were trying to do overall as a band, which was to blend funk and rock. You’ve got a lot of small sounds married to heavy guitars through Marshall amps. It’s a great combination. Your ears are constantly being challenged and pulled different ways. The drums, too – there’s big, fat, ambient drums that exist in the same sonic space as these tiny little drum boxes.”

Never Tear Us Apart

“In preparing the 25 Anniversary re-release of Kick, I went back into the tape box and listened very carefully to the master recordings and some of the other studio reels, and I was amazed at the version of Never Tear Us Apart. It’s us playing live with no overdubs. The drum take is the same as what’s on the album, but there’s a different arrangement, different vocal, sax part, and there’s no strings.

“On the record, I played the string parts on a keyboard, but originally I did it on guitar. When I heard the tape again, I thought, Wow, this is pretty cool. It shows people exactly what we were thinking when we did the demo. Chris Thomas said to us, ‘This is a great song, but I don’t know about the instrumentation. I think it needs a more formal sound.’ He suggested the strings, which worked beautifully. They have the right kind of empathy for the vocal.

“Thinking about Never Tear Us Apart, I just have to say how much respect I have for Michael as a songwriter, a singer and, in particular, as a lyricist. He didn’t play an instrument, but his voice and his words were his instruments. He was phenomenal.”

Mystify

“Jon Farriss and I were talking about the song the other day. It has a groove that’s almost like blues, but it more goes into the zone of Swing. It was a funny track for us to be doing in that era. The whole music scene had moved away from your basic bar-band blues scene, which is what our background was, playing pubs and all.

“Going into the Kick album, Michael and I were in Chicago, working on a few more demos. It was a 16-track studio with a piano. We wrote Mystify there, made a demo of it and a couple of others – there was a song called Move On that didn’t make the record. The band loved Mystify, and they really did a great take of it. Tim and Kirk’s guitar playing is fantastic. The drums are just massive. The whole thing turned out cool.”

Kick

“When I made a demo of the song, it had a lot of acoustic guitar and was quite different from the album version. Michael really liked it, but he wanted to toughen it up. He thought we should get rid of the acoustics and play it as a straight-out rock song with the brass and everything. I think that was the right call.

“The band did a knockout job, but Michael really took ownership of the song. If you listen to the vocal, he’s unbelievable – such cool confidence. Great sax by Kirk, as always.”

Calling All Nations

“We’ve been playing it live again recently and having some fun with it. It fits in with the whole funk-rock genre of what we were trying to stay the course with. I think the song ties everything together with its big, thumping groove.

“We had toured a lot and had been around the world, so we wanted something that reflected what we were feeling. When you travel internationally as much as we had, and you’re under so much pressure, you do think to yourself sometimes, Well, what are we doing?… We weren’t just in one country with one mindset of people. We were talking to everybody. So to have a song titled Calling All Nations made a lot of sense.

“I love the musicianship on the track. Everybody contributed really interesting and effective parts. The song felt right. In fact, we even called one section of our tour for the album the Calling All Nations tour.”

Tiny Daggers

“To me, it sounds almost like Springsteen, but that’s not what Michael and I were thinking of as writers. When we put the demo together, believe it or not, we were more thinking, What would Elvis do?

“It changed a bit when we got around to recording it. The rhythm track is particularly cool – great work by Jon and Garry there. I actually wound up playing a pretty big guitar solo on the song, which is a first for me. Usually Tim or Kirk handle the solos, so I’m kind of proud of my bit on the guitar. And it ends the record well, so there you have it.”

6

“On Dec. 8, 1957, CBS producer Robert Herridge assembled many of the great pioneers of jazz to perform together on live television, as part of ‘The Sound of Jazz.’ One of the most memorable performances of the night was Billie Holiday’s 'Fine and Mellow.’

By 1957, Holiday had experienced her share of trouble with drugs and hard living, and her voice was not what it once had been. Yet that day, on the set of 'The Sound of Jazz,’ it was clear that she was still a singer with an impeccable sense of timing and a style that could convey both joy and suffering. Nat Hentoff, music writer and part of the production team that organized ‘The Sound of Jazz,’ recalls the highlight of the broadcast:

'The song she sang that, to most people (including me), was the climax of the show was one of the few songs that she herself ever wrote: 'Fine and Mellow.’ It’s a basic 12-bar blues. It may be the only blues song she ever wrote, although the language of the blues, the texture of the blues, the cry of the blues was always part of what she did.’”

TJ Oshie is not 27
  • Grandpa: Chicago and the Blues are playing?
  • Me: Yup.
  • Grandpa: Is that little guy from the olympics I like playing yet?
  • Me: No, Oshie isn't playing tonight, and he isn't "little" he has a daughter.
  • Grandpa: Oh fuck, really?! He can't be older than 19
  • Me: Gramps he is 27
  • Grandpa: No way. Who are you talking about? I'm talking about the little guy who took all the penalty shots for the US!
  • Me: I know Gramps, that's TJ Oshie, he is 27 with a baby daughter.
  • Grandpa: 27? Nope you must have the wrong guy. *walks away*
3

“But actually, there were parts of the singing, aside from the yodeling, which I hadn’t anticipated would be so challenging. It’s so interesting, the way Hank had such instinctive control over his own instrument that sometimes he would bend a single note, and glide through three in one… [Pauses, sings.] "Came in last night at a half past 10, that baby of mine wouldn’t let me in / So move it on oooooooooover…” He would twist and bend that o through a series of notes. And Rodney was correctly exacting about that. Every time we’d go back and try. If I was too metronomic and precise about the beat, Rodney wanted me to try and break that up a bit. Because Hank Williams was basically a blues singer, so I would have to be more rebellious with the beat and the rhythm, without being out of time. I think that was the most challenging aspect of it. “Lovesick Blues” was my own personal Everest, because it’s such an extraordinary song, and what he does with it is unique.“

-Tom Hiddleston
[http://www.theverge.com/2016/4/1/11345774/tom-hiddleston-playing-hank-williams-was-like-riding-a-very]

Makeup tips

For my fellow makeup wearing friends.

• Black eyeliner on your bottom waterline may make your eyes pop like fire, but it also narrows your eyes (helpful for my large eyed friends).

• White eyeliner on your waterline makes your eyes seem a lot bigger.

• Get some pencil or gel eyeliner that matches your mascara for your upper waterline. This’ll keep that annoying little flesh colored space that pops up in between your lashes and your top eyeliner

• Learn how to contour. That shit can create magic for your face

• Blush is hella awesome. Use more softer, skin tones for a natural look, and pretty pinks and reds for a bold look

• Blue eyes? Coppers and neutral eyeshadows will make your baby blues pop

• Brown eyes? Blues, neutrals, basically any cool colors. Be proud of your pretty warm eyes ♡

• Green/hazel? Warm colors, neutrals (literally neutrals go with anything!)

• All mascaras are not the same! Find what you need the most. If you have long lashes, but they’re thin, find some volumizing/plumping mascaras. Short but thick lashes? Lengthening mascara.

Feel free to add on! ♡