based on this evidence

Just the Nurse

“It’s just the nurse”
A statement I’ve heard more times than I can recall.
A statement I vacillate between being utterly pissed off at; given some people take for granted what we do, take for granted how consistently we are the ones by their side and not seen - and a statement I’m also sometimes not offended at, pausing as I consider how perhaps we’re simply seen as a circle of trust.

Just the nurse who caught the baby’s heart murmur

Just the nurse who listened when everyone else walked out the door

Just the nurse who carefully cleaned parts of you when others shouted what’s that horrible smell in that room.

Just the nurse who had to call your annoyed provider 5 times just for them to come talk to you and answer your questions

Just the nurse who threw their back out from years and years of physical exertion with turning and positioning.

Just the nurse who contributes daily to interdisciplinary rounds, to discussions surrounding your care for the day

Just the nurse who advocates for quality of life discussions

Just the nurse who helped the baby docs when they were med students, when they were residents, when they were scared.

Just the nurse who continues to advocate and work collaboratively with your doctor so you get the kind of care our system so ardently resists.

Just the nurse who teaches the new mama how to hold, nurse and bathe their baby

Just the nurse who cared for you over and over, day after day, admission after admission for 12 hour shifts and made you their world

Just the nurse who fights hard for safe staffing ratios so you get the quality of care you deserve.

Just the nurse who stands their ground and tosses out anyone who interferes with your healing or recovery time.

Just the nurse who prayed for you when science no longer had any answers

Just the nurse who cares for you as you take your last breath

Just the nurse who comforts your family when they have nowhere to go with their grief.

Just the nurse who gently wraps you in a shroud and pauses quietly to keep you in their own memory and heart

Just the nurse who doesn’t demand you respect us, rather quietly asks that you don’t insult our presence.

Just the nurse, the highly educated bachelors, masters, and doctorate level prepared, certified nurses who worked hard to attain the scientific and evidence practice based knowledge that will help save your life.

Just the nurse who isn’t perfect, but works every day to learn more and perfect their care.

Just the nurse who goes home and cries for you.

Every other day, Every other week may in everyone’s eyes be about every other provider, but let today, let this week not be an insult; let it just simply be about the nurse.

Happy National Nurses Day,
Happy National Nurses week -
To “just” the nurses.

5

i wanted to have a go at designing a set of unique armour for my bloodborne character, so here he is! he’s an ex-combat medic/barber surgeon with a very bad (or dad?) sense of humour. 

(plus some fake screencaps, because they’re fun to draw.) 

You don’t care about other people’s possessions or emotions, Stan? 

Well you were concerned about Mabel’s feelings and rescued Waddles by punching a dinosaur in the face just for her. 

You were also concerned about the kids’ safety and kicked a lot of zombie ass for them. 

Plus you’ve spent 30 years trying to save your brother because you cared about him. 

And you were heartbroken when your brother was angry and didn’t thank you for saving him. 

You used your gum trick on the dice to save Dipper and Ford when they were in trouble. 

And the fact that you left the debate just to rescue Dipper and Mabel when they were in trouble. 

Don’t forget the time you went to check in on Mabel to see if she was doing alright. 

You also became very emotional to see that the kids were okay and alive.

And you also were concerned that Bill was gonna hurt the kids. I mean JUST LOOK AT THE FACE YOU MADE HERE. 

You cared for your family so much THAT YOU PUNCHED A DEMON AND HAD YOUR MIND ERASED just for them. 

You threw the kids a huge party on their last day.

You cared about Soos so much that you gave him your JOB.

You were sad that your pumpkin was upset about not being able to let Waddles come home with her, so you threatened to give the bus driver a good beat down if he didn’t let Waddles on the bus. 

You were so sad about the kids leaving. I mean YOU STARTED CRYING HERE. 

And you were so glad that your brother is bonding with you again. 

And you’re telling us that you don’t care about others?!

Well Stan, based on all these evidence it sounds like you DO care. You’re a big softie :)

When Each of the Types Love You
  • INTJ: Actually focuses 100% of their attention on you and listens to what you have to say...and modifies their opinions based on your evidence.
  • INFJ: They pick up on the little things you do and compliment you on them. They forgive you at your worst.
  • ENTJ: They take time off of work to spend time with you. Listen carefully to your ideas and help you reach your goals. And they let you cuddle them.
  • ENFJ: Act serious around you. Think hard about your relationship and plans out a future with you that deals with conflict in the most efficient way possible. They also give you starry-eyed looks.
  • INFP: They try to talk to you ALL THE TIME. They tell you how attractive/pretty/handsome you are whenever possible. They initiate physical affection and tell you about their emotions.
  • INTP: They blush. They act childishly silly and goofy around you. They compliment you and remember little details about you.
  • ENTP: They admit they have feelings for you and say so often. They commit to you and help you with your plans and troubles. They initiate physical affection and plan a future with you.
  • ENFP: You become their universe. They relate everything to you and help you visualize your future and will conveniently include themselves in that future. They offer advice for the relationship's progression and they act mature and committed to you.
  • ISFP: They mention "growing old" with you. They tell you that you're what they've been looking for and that they'd like you to be their best friend...for as long as time on earth allows (may be less dramatic but same idea)
  • ISTP: They say they love you. They mean it. And they act flustered and amazed around you.
  • ESTP: They tell you that you're their world. They do anything and everything for you if you ask. They'll fight for you and dote on you--even at inopportune times.
  • ESFP: They show you off to all of their friends and stick with you through thick and thin. They forgive you and sympathize with your problems. Show seriousness and loyalty.
  • ISFJ: They do all they can to help you. They ask how you're doing 100 times a day. They offer to fight someone for you. They think about your ideas/plans and try to apply them to their own lives.
  • ISTJ: They dote on you. They defend you and try to keep you as happy as possible. They show an incredibly affectionate side and say they love you.
  • ESTJ: They take time off work to spend time with you. They plan vacations and breaks with you and present you with gifts and shower you with affection.
  • ESFJ: They support you in every way. You disagree? They still support you because they love you. They want to see you succeed and will help you with ANYTHING. They help you with your daily tasks and talk about a future with you.

Something I’ve run into quite a lot while doing the whole “project manager” thing is artist who are openly hostile to the idea of engaging with the “business side” of what they do. There’s this broad perception that that business side of art means advertising and merchandising and selling out, and while it certainly can mean that, a lot of it is much more basic - and it’s stuff that’s absolutely not optional if art is anything beyond a personal fun-time hobby for you.

Stuff like:

1. Having reality-based metrics for time and resource commitment - or, in plain English, making sure that what you’re charging for your commissions is actually based on how hard they are to do.

It’s downright shocking how rare this is. I’ve encountered digital artists who routinely charge less for a spec that takes them much longer to do based on purely abstract notions of how “complex” the piece is, without reference to their actual, demonstrable time commitment. Heck, I’ve run into a traditional artist who ended up making nickles per hour for a major commission because she hadn’t correctly tallied up the cost of the art supplies expended in producing it!

The only way to arrive at appropriate metrics is based on evidence; your off-the-cuff estimates will always, always be wrong. Literally time yourself as you work on pieces of various types, and write down how long it took you. And never assume that it will be quicker next time; that’s called the planning fallacy, and it will eat you alive if you let it.

2. Having a lifecycle management plan for the tools you need to work.

Tablets don’t last forever. Neither do computers. Even software can become so outdated and incompatible as to lose utility over time. Basically, your tools have a finite lifespan, and you need to have a plan for replacing them as needed.

I understand that many independent artists don’t have the means to save up for new and replacement tools, and rely on second-hand hardware, gifts from friends and family, or donation drives on their blogs to fill the gap. That’s fine - artists relying on patronage has a long and distinguished history. The important thing is that these avenues be part of a plan, not a desperate scramble after some 100% foreseeable circumstance has rendered you unable to work.

Data on average time-to-failure for your hardware is readily accessible online; if, for example, that particular brand of tablet tends to last about three years, then you need to start organising your donation drive or dropping hints for your birthday at two years and six months, even if your equipment seems perfectly fine. The same goes for software; the vendor’s support window (i.e., the time after which they’ll stop publishing bugfixes and security updates) for your version of the software is a known factor.

3.  Having a formal requirements-gathering and signoff procedure.

I know that sounds like a lot of boring paperwork, and to be honest it kind of is, but it’s also critical for anything you’re not drawing for yourself. Language is an imprecise medium; based on a few minutes of casual conversation, you can easily end up in situations where you and your commissioner have totally different understandings of what the job entails, yet you’re both convinced you’ve understood the other perfectly.

You should have a detailed written description of what’s involved, and your client’s explicit, documented confirmation that they’ve read, understood and agreed to it, before you draw a single stroke. This includes timelines and deliverables as well as content; I’ve run into numerous cases of clients who’ve alleged non-delivery of services based on their understanding that they’d be receiving a traditional, ink-and-paper piece where the artist understood the commission to involve only digital work, and more than one case where a client started hollering about breach of contract less than 24 hours after signing off because they honestly thought it would be done already.

You have to nip that in the bud; this level of documentation is a bare minimum for anyone who takes money to do art, not a nice-to-have.

anonymous asked:

un-biased analysis on that jikook vlive in osaka of them possibly doing bro things while naked in the dark pLEASE

First of all, you asked for this

Second of all, I’m just gonna point out a few things because the whole video was just…weird and try not to shove jikook down your throats cause that’s not fun (and also because there’s no actual evidence of Jimin being in the room in the first place)

Keep reading

An All-Inclusive Guide to Making Your First Year in Practice Not Suck As Much As Wayfaring’s

Hi there, just curious if you’d share what things you were looking for in your first job vs what things you value now, now that you’ve been working out there on your own. Anything that must be in the contract that wasn’t there before (or vice versa)? Tips for future graduating residents?

Yaaaaasssss so many advices. So many things. This ask has been in my inbox for months because I have too many things to say about it and I can’t seem to organize it properly. 

Let’s break it down into 3 sections: 1) What I thought I wanted 2) What I needed and didn’t know to ask/look for 3) What I want now. Here goes.

What I thought I wanted:

  • big dolla$$$
  • super sweet signing bonus
  • moving allowance
  • loan repayment assistance
  • regular 40 hour work schedule
  • nice patients
  • independence / autonomy in decisionmaking
  • ability to practice the way I was trained - with up to date guidelines and procedures and equipment


What I wanted and didn’t know to ask for:

  • Supportive colleagues - In your first year of practice out of residency you lose every ounce of confidence that you gained as a senior resident. You question minor decisions and are constantly afraid of killing people or being sued. It is extra hard to practice in a new town when your partners in practice are not supportive. Sometimes you need someone to lay a fresh set of eyes on a wonky EKG or a weird rash, you know? I didn’t have that option. It made me study harder and somewhat be more cautious and definitely more creative in my practice. But having a colleague to commiserate with at the end of the day or to consult on difficult cases would have been really nice. You don’t have to be BFFs with your colleagues, but they have to be people you can agree/get along with and trust to take care of your patients in your absence.
  • Friends - This sounds obvious, but I moved to a new town that literally has no people anywhere close to my age. Even having one person I knew and could confide in would have been wonderful. One person to go to a movie with or watch a football game with would have been a sanity saver for me. Find a place where you can find other people like you. 
  • A reasonable amount of time off - I got less time off in my first job than I did as a resident. That was unacceptable to me. This would be fine if my practice didn’t act like they were going to go bankrupt if I took an unpaid day or even a half day to go to the doctor, but they did. You need a place where you can take one week off every 3-4 months if possible, even if all that time isn’t paid. Medicine is such a stressful job. Make sure they’re giving you rest time.
  • A non-toxic work environment - I knew going into my job that I was replacing a workaholic and that I was joining a workaholic. What I didn’t realize was that I was also expected to be a workaholic and anything less than killing myself was seen as laziness. Pay attention to the culture at your new job. Ask the docs what they do for fun or to relax and more importantly when the last time was they did that thing. If they don’t have any answers, they’re too busy. 
  • Diversity. This may just be me, but I went into family medicine because I get bored easily. I need variety of patient types and disease types and socioeconomic groups and everything else. I realized quickly in my practice that most of my patients were privately insured elderly white people. As in, the most boring demographic for Wayfaring
  • A Balanced schedule. I figured that when I joined a practice that had been established for 30 years that the workflow kinks would have been worked out and it would run like a well oiled machine. In reality I would have 8 physicals a day and 5 of my most complicated patients in hospital follow ups back to back, all scheduled for just 15 minutes. There has to be balance in the schedule. You have to be able to take a little extra time here and make it up elsewhere. 


What I want now: 

  • fair dolla$$$. In actuality, what’s fair is actually considerably more than what I was making in my first job. I was grossly underpaid, particularly considering this being a rural area where nobody wants to work (typically those jobs are paid much higher). It’s not about the bottom dollar value for me. It’s about compensating me in a way that is comparable to my peers. 
  • Colleagues who can be both friends and mentors. See above. 
  • Good benefits. Two years of no dental or vision sucks when your most expensive problems are dental and vision related. Life insurance and retirement plans aren’t something most 30 year olds think of, but they’re really important, and I didn’t have those to start with. 
  • A flexible schedule. The whole world doesn’t need to fall apart if I need to switch my regular day off or if I need a half day to go to the doctor. 
  • Administrative time. Preferably a full week day, but a half day is great too. I’m happy working 4 10 or 12 hour days a week to have one week day off to catch up on work I’m behind on or get my hair cut and get my taxes done and see my psychiatrist, you know?
  • Knowledgeable and helpful staff. I need staff who don’t perpetuate old wives’ tales and notions like “you need a zpack for that cold”. I need to work with people who will ask if they don’t understand something rather than just make something up and who can help me educate my patients. I need folks who are prompt and who can anticipate some needs. 
  • To not be responsible for other peoples’ paychecks. In private practice, if I take time off or scale back, the practice loses money and thus our staff lose hours or money too. The staff in my first job were horribly underpaid and I don’t like the idea of the entire burden of the practice’s finances hanging on my shoulders. Sign me up for that hospital-owned practice, please.
  • To not have to turn patients away based on payer source. This is a national problem and is definitely not limited to my first job. But my first job wouldn’t let me take Medicaid patients at all. It made it completely impossible for me to build any sort of pediatric or OB practice in our town. I don’t like the idea of turning away a patient because their type of insurance doesn’t pay as well. I want to just treat patients and not have to worry about their payments. Hello, single payer healthcare system. Get on it! Obviously I will still have to worry about whether my patient can afford their meds or whether their insurance will cover their meds, but I won’t have to pick and choose what patients I accept based on their payer source. 
  • To deliver quality, up to date care. To work with people who will back up my evidence-based decisions and not practice based on feelings and patient satisfaction. To work with people who will encourage me to learn more and do new things. 

There you have it folks. A lil summary of what I want, what you might want, and what I’ve learned in these first (almost) 2 years of practice. Here’s to better future jobs for us all!

Psychology Book Recommendations

Foundational Authors & Works

Carl Rogers, On Becoming a Person

B. F. Skinner,  Beyond Freedom and Dignity and About Behaviorism and Walden Two

Viktor Frankl, Man’s Search for Meaning

Sigmund Freud, Civilization and its Discontents

John Norcross (editor), Evidence-Based Practices in Mental Health

Psychopathology & Diagnosis 

David Barlow (editor), Clinical Handbook of Psychological Disorders

Oliver Saks, Hallucinations

Kelly Lambert, Clinical Neuroscience

Criticisms & Controversial Topics

Stephen Hinshaw, The ADHD Explosion

Robert Whitaker, Mad in America and Anatomy of an Epidemic

Ronald Miller, Not So Abnormal Psychology

Allen Frances, Saving Normal

Bruce Wampold, The Great Psychotherapy Debate

Therapy Theories 

Carl Rogers, Client-Centered Therapy

Irvin Yalom, The Theory and Practice of Group Psychotherapy

Aaron Beck, Cognitive Therapy of Depression

Steven Hayes, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy

Judith Beck, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

Danny Wedding, Current Psychotherapies

William Miller, Motivational Interviewing

Jacqueline Person, Cognitive Therapy in Practice

Evidence-Based Therapy Manuals 

Marsha Linehan, DBT Skills Training Manual and Cognitive Behavioral Treatment of Borderline Personality Disorder

Michelle Craske, Mastery of Your Anxiety and Panic

David Burns, Feeling Good

Richard Zinbarg, Mastery of Your Anxiety and Worry

Martha Davis, The Relaxation and Stress Reduction Workbook

Lisa Najavitis, Seeking Safety

Expert Therapist Perspectives

Irvin Yalom, The Gift of Therapy and Love’s Executioner

First Person Perspectives

Kay Jamison, An Unquiet Mind

Elyn Saks, The Center Cannot Hold

William Styron, Darkness Visible

Carolyn Spiro and Pamela Spiro Wagner, Divided Minds

Research Design & Analysis

Alan Kazdin, Research Design in Clinical Psychology and Single-Case Research Designs

John Creswell, Qualitative Inquiry and Research Design

Culture & Diversity

Derald Wing Sue, Counseling the Culturally Diverse and Case Studies in Multicultural Counseling and Therapy

Stigma

Stephen Hinshaw, Breaking the Silence and  The Mark of Shame

Grad School and Careers in Psychology

Peggy Hawley, Being Bright is Not Enough

Adam Ruben, Surviving Your Stupid, Stupid Decision to Go to Grad School

Peter Feibelman, A PhD is Not Enough

Paul Silva, How to Write A Lot

Karen Kelsky, The Professor Is In 

How can the state of Molly’s hair tell us that Sherlock Series 4 will have four episodes? It’s not as loony as it sounds.  Come and see and I’m sure you’ll be convinced! I am now 100% certain there will be a fourth episode, based on this evidence…

Word count: 458 (yep, it’s a quick read!)
Ao3 link: http://archiveofourown.org/works/9523913

Hello, @teapotsubtext, @thesetison, and @marcespot, I’m tagging you all because I linked to posts or blogs of yours in this meta. I hope that’s all right!

the elevator scene analysis

so here’s my over-analysis on the elevator scene that nobody asked for. i hope you’re ready for Keith being a pining little shit

so Lance decides to check out the pool. of course he would! he grew up on the beach and is the guardian spirit of water. that’s totally something he’d be all over. he loves swimming.

so it’s kinda interesting that Keith of all people would also want to go swimming. he’s the polar opposite of Lance, he’s the fire paladin. water isn’t really his thing tbh? (doesn’t mean he can’t enjoy swimming though, but you get what i mean)

while it could just be coincidental that he decided to go check out the pool at the same time Lance did, i get the feeling Keith found out Lance was going swimming and wanted to join him but pretended that he didn’t know what Lance was doing ‘cause he doesn’t wanna make it obvious that there’s something else he wants to check out

what do you mean “what do you think you’re doing?” Keith??? he’s wearing swim trunks and a towel and is on the same elevator as you how can you not make the obvious conclusion that he’s going swimming???? you’re a terrible liar 

okay look, i know how i get when i have a crush on somebody. i will find literally any excuse to be around them, but will try to downplay it and make it seem like i totally don’t care. i’d recognize that kinda behavior anywhere. and Keith? totally trying to downplay it right now. “i just so happened to want to go swimming at the same time my crush did and stopped him in the elevator before he could go without me but pffsh i totally am NOT trying to find an excuse to be around him. i’ll prove it by making sure he knows we will be on opposite ends of the pool and i’m totally not interested in being around him!”

okay Keith, i think we get the point ;D (the way he says this line sounds so forced like he’s trying not to make things awkward oh my god)

if you go back and watch this scene, Keith looks over at Lance first. probably because he just realized he got stuck in an elevator, with his crush, while wearing bathing suits. the first thing running through his mind right now is probably “hHOL YSsHIT”

Lance looks over at Keith like “are you fucking kidding me right now” 

and Keith is like “shit gotta keep acting like this is the opposite of the best day of my life”

so anyways we cut back to this scene after a brief moment with Pidge and Hunk, and while i bet Keith would come up with any excuse to get close to Lance, i like to think it was Lance’s idea to crawl up the elevator shaft like this. he’s the kind of person who would come up with crazy ideas like this if he was that determined to get to the pool. i have absolutely no doubt Keith was internally screaming the whole time.

he proceeds to bicker with Lance like usual and they shove each other. if you look closely after Keith shoves Lance back though, you’ll notice he keeps leaning against Lance more than before. probably ‘cause he’s secretly enjoying the physical contact

lmao

poor Lance, he just wants to go swimming. let the dolphin boy swim

Keith: this is literally one of the best things that has ever happened to me don’t ruin it

Keith spots the vent shaft and they finally get out of there

listen, i don’t know if it was just intentional but it seriously looks like these two aren’t looking in the same direction. Lance is looking up at the vent shaft like “finally, thank god” whereas Keith looks like he’s just staring at nothing in particular, probably thinking to himself “well this was exciting but now we get to go swimming which is gonna be even better. nice”

tl;dr: Keith found out Lance was going swimming so he wanted to as well but pretended like it was just a coincidence, and totally was secretly enjoying the fact that he got trapped in an elevator with his crush. and based on all the pining!Keith evidence we have so far, i don’t see why this can’t be the case.

Teachers must ditch ‘neuromyth’ of learning styles, say scientists

Teaching children according to their individual “learning style” does not achieve better results and should be ditched by schools in favour of evidence-based practice, according to leading scientists.

Thirty eminent academics from the worlds of neuroscience, education and psychology have signed a letter to the Guardian voicing their concern about the popularity of the learning style approach among some teachers.

They say it is ineffective, a waste of resources and potentially even damaging as it can lead to a fixed approach that could impair pupils’ potential to apply or adapt themselves to different ways of learning.

The group opposes the theory that learning is more effective if pupils are taught using an individual approach identified as their personal “learning style”. Some pupils, for example, are identified as having a “listening” style and could therefore be taught with storytelling and discussion rather than written exercises.

The academics say the learning style approach is ineffective, a waste of resources and potentially even damaging. Photograph: Alamy Stock Photo

my prediction about the clary/simon/jace love triangle in 2b, based on factual evidence and my super powers:

jace is gonna be nice yk tell clary they’re not related, that he respects her relationship with simon and wouldn’t wanna ruin it, play a little reverse psychology on her, and then clary is gradually gonna be like ‘well shit i kinda want him back now that he’s not my brother’ and at some point in the near future her and simon are gonna break up and clary is gonna run to jace thinking that’s what he wanted all along, but what she doesn’t know is that his plan TO STEAL HER BOYFRIEND WORKED and then jace and simon kiss and everyone is happy the end :)