bas reliefs

100 Art Objects, Historical Artifacts, and Miscellaneous Loot
  1. A marble bust of a large-nosed woman
  2. A richly woven carpet with nautical patterns
  3. Soft, clean bedsheets sewn with golden thread
  4. A portrait of a bashful looking tiefling
  5. Eight matching silver cups
  6. A ceremonial helm with a daisy motif
  7. A coil of silken cable, intricately braided and tasseled
  8. An ancient fertility sculpture
  9. A nautilus shell
  10. A stack of fine vellum
  11. Richly embroidered blue sleeping robes
  12. A huge tortoise shell
  13. A polished silver looking-glass
  14. A set of gem-encrusted cutlery
  15. Silk handkerchiefs
  16. A necklace thickly adorned with bright feathers
  17. A small dragon skull
  18. A collection of beautiful glass bottles of all colours
  19. A snake skin of tremendous length and quality
  20. Well preserved tapestries depicting an important historical event
  21. A set of fine jewelcrafting tools
  22. A chess set of excellent quality
  23. A set of non-magical but intricately etched daggers
  24. An ermine coat
  25. Soft doeskin boots beautifully crafted for small feet
  26. A collection of flags and banners once flown by nations now extinct
  27. White silk gloves
  28. A satchel made of glossy crimson leather
  29. A rattle made from a cloven hoof
  30. Paper pouches full of dried herbs and spices
  31. A red and silver scepter
  32. A porcelain doll garbed in a beautiful ballgown
  33. A large bismuth crystal
  34. A box containing several elaborately decorated animal masks
  35. A glass orb containing a tablespoon of quicksilver
  36. A vase containing numerous exotic feathers
  37. A golden ceremonial shield featuring an unfamiliar charge
  38. Ten large glass marbles of various colours
  39. A richly illuminated, leather-bound manuscript of local history
  40. A rare coin collection
  41. A massive scarlet crustacean claw
  42. Pots of powdered henna, turmeric, and indigo
  43. A long spiral antelope horn, polished and banded in silver
  44. Two oblong pearls of modest size
  45. An exquisitely preserved fish fossil
  46. A set of lavish quills and two pots of deep blue ink
  47. Three canopic jars, and the broken lid of a fourth
  48. A hand-carved, gold leaf frame, sans painting
  49. A masterful portrait of a stern couple, sans frame
  50. Beautiful horse tack
  51. A glass jar filled with layers of sand of various colours
  52. A snow leopard skin in fine condition
  53. A huge vanilla scented candle
  54. A wooden case containing two dozen bars of sealing wax
  55. A hand-carved mash paddle made from black wood
  56. A silver locket containing a lock of silver hair
  57. A crystal bottle of perfume
  58. A carving made from jet featuring the head of a gorgon
  59. Twelve fine drinking glasses wrapped in cotton
  60. A brass cast of a skull
  61. An ancient ceremonial sword of a powerful queen, its blade half rotted away
  62. A silver flask
  63. A wooden frame containing a complex gear mechanism of unknown purpose
  64. Pouches of very rare seeds that grow into valuable plants
  65. A geode
  66. A tome of forgotten ballads written by a legendary bard
  67. A terribly gaudy cuckoo clock elaborately inlaid with silver and gold
  68. A half-finished bolt of patterned cloth, still attached to the loom
  69. A large tangle of coral
  70. A church bell featuring a religious tale in bas relief
  71. Gold candleabras
  72. A brass statuette of a religious figure
  73. Two oak barrels of alcoholic spirits
  74. A sack of bathing salts
  75. A box of lace
  76. A folder stuffed with dwarven beer recipes
  77. Spools of excellent leather cord
  78. Medicated creams and ointments
  79. A box of colourful makeup
  80. A pouch full of glimmering pearlescent fish scales
  81. A silver dog whistle shaped like a howling wolf
  82. Ivory spice shakers
  83. A jar of herbal honey
  84. A large incisor on a leather thong
  85. Powdered animal parts
  86. Gold false teeth
  87. A bulk lot of mundane smithed items, including locks, hinges, etc.
  88. An empty silver lockbox with key
  89. Elegant red skates
  90. Blue suede shoes
  91. A dried caul
  92. A taxedermied platypus
  93. A censer
  94. Three wax likenesses, one slightly melted
  95. A telescope
  96. A set of tinkling hand bells
  97. Coffee beans
  98. Tortoiseshell combs
  99. Copper bottom cook pots
  100. A flanged steel plug of some kind
Architecture (Part 11): Assyrian Palaces

Temples with & without ziggurats were built at Assyria.  But by the late Assyrian period, palaces were much more important & more numerous, emphasizing the monarchy’s importance.

In the 800’s BC, Ashurnasirpal II restored & enlarged the city of Nimrud, and had a palace built within its walls.  The north-west wing was the most public, and at the north was a large public outer court. A suite of apartments (including for the women) was on the east side, and a series of large banqueting halls on the south side.

This would become the traditional Assyrian palace plan.  Palace remains at Nineveh, Nimrud and Kouyunjik, built during the 700’s & 600’s BC, have similar plans, and are built on elevated platforms, surrounded by terraces.

Ashurnasirpal II’s palace.  Three huge doors on the outer court’s south wall led to the throne room, which was long & narrow, and ran nearly the whole width of the courtyard.

A flight of steps led to the palace, and the main entrance was guarded by lamassu – winged stone bulls made of stone.  They protected the gates from evil, with a lion’s fierceness, an eagle’s far-sightedness, a bull’s strength, and a human’s intelligence.

Lamassu at the palace entrance (destroyed by ISIS in 2015).

Below is a drawing of what an Assyrian palace may have looked like. This palace has an elevated, buttressed terrace, a flight of steps lined with carved figures as homage to the king, an open upper storey to admit light, and a roof ridge with battlements.

Assyrian bas-reliefs depicted powerful, life-like men and animals. The sculptors were knowledgeable of anatomy & movement, and how to carve it; at the same time they stylized the subject for ornament.

Orthostats (large stone panels) were arranged in tiers on high walls, and as friezes on low walls.  Fierce beasts, bulls, griffins and lions were common subjects.  Sometimes the king was shown killing them, to demonstrate his bravery, and symbolizing the triumph of good over evil.

Pavement slab from the North Palace at Nineveh.  The outer border is decorated with a pattern based on the lotus flower, similar to Ancient Egyptian ornamentation.  Narrow bands of circular rosettes divide them from the inner border of stylized flowers, and another stylized flower in the centre.

Sculptured ornamental border from Nineveh.  It depicts lamassu and stylized plants, which are perhaps a sacred tree.  Borders of flowers & animals were sometimes painted on ceiling beams, with gilding & precious stones to add richness & contrast.

Sculpted panels in the ruins of the Palace of Nineveh show some of the architectural details made by the Assyrian builders (or possibly Greek builders).  On of these details was voluted capitals (capitals with a spiral, scroll-like ornament on top), and they looked similar tot he Greek Ionic & Corinthian capitals, which also had volutes.

An Ionic capital on the Treasury Building (Washington D.C., USA).

The Obelisk of Divanubara (Nineveh, c.800 BC) was built with sun-baked and kiln-burned bricks.  It tapered towards the top, with stepped layers on top.  Carvings and inscriptions showed that it had a funerary purpose.

Obelisk of Divanubara.

El paraguas, fuente y columna escultórica diseñada por Pedro Ramírez Vázquez, decorada con un relieve en bronce de José Chávez Morado, Museo Nacional de Antropología, av. Paseo de la Reforma y Calzada Gandhi, Bosque de Chapultepec, Polanco, Miguel Hidalgo, Ciudad de México 1964

Arqs. Pedro Ramírez Vázquez, Rafael Mijares y Jorge Campuzano

The Paraguas (Umbrella), fountain and sculptural column designed by Pedro Ramirez Vazquez with bronze bas relief sculpture by Jose Chavez Morado, National Museum of Anthropology, Paseo de la Reforma at Gandhi, Chapultepec Park,  Polanco, Miguel Hidalgo, Mexico City 1964

4

The Black Obelisk of Shalmaneser III is an ancient Assyrian sculpture done in bas-relief and inscribed on all sides. It originates from Nimrud, in Northern Iraq, and commemorates the deeds of King Shalmaneser III. It is the single most complete Assyrian obelisk discovered and is thought to display the earliest depiction of a biblical figure: Jehu, King of Israel. However, this is debated.

Measuring 2 meters tall and carved from black limestone, the obelisk features twenty different reliefs, five per side. They depict five different kings, offering tribute to their new overlord, the Assyrian King Shalmaneser III. Each scene also has cuneiform script, naming the kings and their tributes, but also recording Shalmaneser’s military campaigns.

World History: Ishtar Gate

The Ishtar Gate was the eighth gate to the inner city of Babylon. It was constructed in about 575 BCE by order of King Nebuchadnezzar II on the north side of the city. Dedicated to the Babylonian goddess Ishtar, the gate was constructed using glazed brick with alternating rows of bas-relief mušḫuššu (dragons) and aurochs (bulls), symbolizing the gods Marduk and Adad respectively.It was excavated in the early 20th century and a reconstruction using original bricks is now shown in the Pergamon Museum, Berlin. [x]

Symbols for the Degrees: Capricorn

The Sabian Symbols were symbols or “images” designated to each degree of each sign in the zodiac by clairvoyant Elsie Wheeler in 1925. They can be used to paint a specific picture of each of your placements based on its degree.

Originally posted by gabrielgonzalezinfante

0th-1st degree: A Native chief claims power from the assembled tribe

1st-2nd degree: Three rose windows in a Gothic church, one damaged by war

2nd-3rd degree: A human soul, in its eagerness for new experiences, seeks embodiment

3rd-4th degree: A group of people outfitting a large canoe at the start of a journey by water

4th-5th degree: Some men rowing a well-filled canoe

5th-6th degree: Ten logs lie under an archway leading to darker woods

6th-7th degree: A veiled prophet speaks, seized by the power of a god

7th-8th degree: In a sunlit home, domesticated birds sing joyously

8th-9th degree: An angel carrying a harp

9th-10th degree: An albatross feeding from the hand of a sailor

10th-11th degree: A large group of pheasant on a private estate

11th-12th degree: An illustrated lecture on natural science reveals little-known aspects of life

12th-13th degree: A fire worshipper meditates on the ultimate realities of existence

13th-14th degree: An ancient bas-relief carved in granite remains a witness to a long-forgotten culture

14th-15th degree: In a hospital, the children’s ward is filled with toys

15th-16th degree: School grounds filled with boys and girls in gym suits

16th-17th degree: A repressed woman finds a psychological release in nudism

17th-18th degree: The Union Jack flag flies from a British warship

18th-19th degree: A 5-year-old child carrying a bag filled with groceries

19th-20th degree: A hidden choir is singing during a religious service

20th-21st degree: A relay race

21st-22nd degree: By accepting defeat gracefully, a general reveals nobility of character

22nd-23rd degree: A soldier receiving two awards for bravery in combat

23rd-24th degree: A woman entering a convent

24th-25th degree: A store filled with precious oriental rugs

25th-26th degree: A nature spirit dancing in the iridescent mist of a waterfall

26th-27th degree: Pilgrims climbing the steep steps leading to a mountain shrine

27th-28th degree: A large aviary

28th-29th degree: A woman reading tea leaves

29th-30th degree: A secret meeting of men responsible for executive decisions in world affairs

Just gonna put this out there. Dont come at me. (even tho I know you all will)

For anyone dragging Jackson for wearing dreads and accusing him of cultural appropriation, you better do some research. They go back to ancient times and have been worn by many cultures through out history.

Some of the earliest depictions of dreadlocks date back as far as 3600 years to the Minoan Civilization, one of Europe’s earliest civilizations centred in Crete (modern Greece). Frescoes discovered on the Aegean island of Thera (modern Santorini, Greece), depict individuals with braided hair styled in long dreadlocks.

In ancient Egypt examples of Egyptians wearing locked hairstyles and wigs have appeared on bas-reliefs, statuary and other artifacts. Mummified remains of ancient Egyptians with locked wigs, have also been recovered from archaeological sites.

During the Bronze Age and Iron Age many peoples in the Near East, Asia Minor, Caucasus, East Mediterranean
and North Africa such as the Sumerians, Elamites, Ancient Egyptians, Ancient Greeks, Akkadians, Assyrians,
Babylonians, Hittites, Amorites, Mitanni, Hattians, Hurrians, Arameans, Eblaites, Israelites, Phrygians,
Lydians, Persians, Medes, Parthians, Chaldeans, Armenians, Georgians, Cilicians and Canaanites/Phoenicians/
Carthaginians are depicted in art with braided or platted hair and beards.Over half of surviving Ancient Greek kouros sculptures (from c. 615 – 485 BC) are found wearing dreadlocks.A Spartan officer depicted with locked hair.
Sartori Plica polonica

In Ancient Greece, kouros sculptures from the Archaic period depict men wearing dreadlocks while Spartan hoplites
(generally described as fair-haired) wore formal locks as part of their battle dress. Spartan magistrates known as Ephors also wore their hair braided in long locks, an Archaic Greek tradition that was steadily abandoned in other Greek kingdoms. The style was worn by Ancient Christian Ascetics in the Middle East and Mediterranean, and the Dervishes of Islam, among others. Some of the very earliest adherents of Christianity in the Middle East may have worn this hairstyle; there are descriptions of James the Just, first Bishop of Jerusalem, who is said to have worn them to his ankles.

Pre-Columbian Aztec priests were described in Aztec codices (including the Durán Codex, the Codex Tudela and the Codex Mendoza) as wearing their hair untouched, allowing it to grow long and matted.

In Senegal, the Baye Fall, followers of the Mouride movement, a Sufi movement of Islam founded in 1887 AD by Shaykh Aamadu. Bàmba Mbàkke, are famous for growing locks and wearing multi-colored gowns. Cheikh Ibra Fall, founder of the Baye Fall school of the Mouride Brotherhood, popularized the style by adding a mystic touch to it. Warriors among the Fulani, Wolof and Serer in Mauritania, and Mandinka in Mali and Niger were known for centuries to have worn cornrows when young and dreadlocks when old.

By culture
Locks have been worn for various reasons in each culture: as an expression of deep religious or spiritual convictions,
ethnic pride, as a political statement and in more modern times, as a representation of a free, alternative or natural
spirit. Another name for the style is locks (sometimes spelled “locs”).

:) 

Credit to girl that posted this, forgot her name, if you know let me know.