bartholomew-allen

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She [Iris] is so loyal to Barry, even when he’s not there. She’s always […] sticking up for him, and I think that’s a testament to their relationship. She’s watched him grow; she’s watched him go through some horrific, traumatic events, and I think if anyone understands his heart it’s Iris. And […] she’s fiercely protective over that. - Candice Patton

Unpopular Opinion

@ all these people saying the writers are ruining Barry’s character and shit….

To be honest I think Cisco has been annoying with being angry at Barry all the freaking time.

Like, yes we get it. Your brother is dead! And he might not be had Barry not fucked up the timeline!

But that’s a very big MIGHT!!!! And Iris already pointed out that Dante could have just died anyway!

Right now it just feels like the writers are writing drama for the sake of drama. And It’s annoying because angsty Cisco is not as fun as happy Cisco. Besides I think most people can agree that there was already enough angst and drama on Arrow last season.

*sigh* TL;DR — The Flash writers are ruining Cisco not Barry, imo.

Bart Allen/Impulse

Okay, so, I don’t think I’ve ever made it any secret how big a fan I am of Bart Allen (aka Bartholomew Allen II, Impulse, Kid Flash II, or The Flash IV). He’s my all time favourite comic book character, and right up there with Huckleberry Finn for my favourite character from all of literature. It’s also not a secret for anyone who has ever heard of Bart that he is fun and wild and reckless and “impulsive”. Hell, Red Tornado basically called him the human embodiment of Id to Superboy and Robin’s respective ego and super-ego. And don’t get me wrong, these are some of my favourite things about Bart, and they are what made his transformation to Kid Flash when he joined the Teen Titans all the more meaningful, but I worry sometimes that people forget the amount of growing up Bart did during Mark Waid’s run of Impulse.

Take, for example, Impulse #6

I would love to post this whole issue, because there is so much important about it, but I do not own any rights to Impulse or its characters, and, honestly, I think you all should go out and buy a copy. But here’s a brief overview of how Bart grows through the book:

In the beginning, Bart is asked by the Vice Principal to hang out with this kid named Preston, who keeps showing up to school with bruises. Bart, having, still recently, spent his whole life living in a video game in which he is the only character, assumes this situation revolves about him and him making friends, but upon the VP’s insistence that it does not, Bart agrees to hang out with Preston.

The two go hang out in a swamp after school because Preston believes there is a monster hiding in the swamp and wants to get him on camera. The pair does see something, but the entire endeavor ends with Preston’s father finding them and yelling at Preston and sending Bart home. The events send up red flags with Bart, at least enough to make him ask Max Mercury (his guardian) what he should do.

While going back to the swamp to fight the “monster”, Bart realizes that it is really just a boy born with a disorder giving him physical deformities, and that he lives in the swamp with his parents, as they are trying to protect him. Upon meeting the parents, the boy’s father says, perhaps the most important line in the book:

At this point, Bart grows up. He realizes there are real monsters in this world, and they aren’t just the villains he fights with Max and Wally. He goes back to Preston’s house, and when Preston’s dad asks why he’s there:

Anyway, the twist in the story is that Preston is actually being abused by his mother. And while Bart (and Preston’s father) witnesses it, he is in costume while doing so, meaning if he was to tell the VP, his secret identity would be seriously compromised.

Deciding whether or not to tell someone about the happenings is a big dilemma for Bart, and he most certainly does NOT make the decision impulsively, but in the end, he decides doing the right thing and protecting his friend is what counts.

Luckily, before Bart can tell, Preston, himself comes forward and tells the Principal about the abuse. Preston’s mother receive therapy and Preston goes to live with his father.

Now, are all Impulse books like this? No. Some are fluffy, some are scary, some are deep, and honestly, there are the odd few I don’t care for. My point here isn’t that people aren’t allowed to enjoy carefree Bart. He’s fun and entertaining and has characteristics that we all wish we had. My point is just that he is also rounded. He’s human. And pretending that he is a flat character who only exists for comic relief is utter nonsense.

[Impulse #55]

“Boo.”

When I feel like I want to make people have a bright and lovely day, I assume that the best way to do this is to post pictures of Bart Allen.

So I do, and I imagine that the world’s a better place for it.