barrel shroud

7

HK21

What started off as an HK91, was converted into an HK21, the belt-fed light machine gun variant of the HK G3. This is a very difficult build to do because of all the added welding and cutting to the receiver. Being an HK the parts are also ridiculously expensive; the barrel shroud alone can cost upwards of $1,800. The rear sight depending on generation can be up to $300. Barrels can be quick changed and if you can find them, are available in different lengths. (GRH)

5

Pieper M1908 prototype

Designed by Nicolas Pieper for the US Army trials of 1906-10, although no record remains of its performance - import mark 8B.
.45ACP seven-round removable box magazine, blowback semi automatic, tipping barrel, shrouded hammer.

Probably my favorite semi automatic handgun out there.

Sauce : James D. Julia Inc.

the tipping barrel shown on a M1908/34 by Steyr


Ok, so we obviously love making NERF assault rifles.

There are tons of Worker 3D printed body kits out there these days - and they are all pretty freaking awesome. We did a Stryfe full size assault rifle with a Worker body kit and it’s amazing - BUT - there are no kits for blasters like the Hyperfire. Plus, those kits are freaking expensive. As an alternative you can buy a cheap spring powered airsoft gun for around 20 bucks and get all kinds of rails and parts off it for a mod. (just make sure it’s full sized 1:1 scale)

Here’s our latest NERF AR, a Hyperfire with airsoft barrel shroud, minimized body, sling mount, detachable stock and 7.4v power. Upper, lower and side weaver rails for any desired attachments. With the Worker 22 round clip it kinda looks like an AK variant. the upper Weaver rail had to be split into sections to allow the jam door to open.

THIS is why we hold onto all those old N-Strike Recons - for the stock attachment piece! (they are also awesome for doing a tactical shotgun out of the Roughcut - the grip and stock mount work great for those)

Still need to add the barrel inside the shroud and finish some soldering - then it’s good to go! Or good to paint, I should say.

2

Sterling Sporter

Made by Wiselite Arms and sold through Century Arms, these 9x19mm carbines are made of a mix of U.S parts and old demilled British MK4 submachine gun parts. It has a 16″ long barrel that extends past the original shroud but the one in the photo has the fake suppressor to cover it up. A variant with a 16″ long barrel shroud was also made by Wiselite, but is much harder to find. (GRH)

M1914 Lewis machine gun

Designed by the American colonel Isaac Newton Lewis, manufactured by Birmingham Small Arms in England. Serial Number A-37289.
47-rounds .303 British pan magazine.

An iconic WW1 weapon design if there’s any. Colonel Lewis was initially slapped with rejections by bitches and whores [sic] from the US army, so he went off to Liège in Belgium to found his own company, Armes Automatiques Lewis, and started to look for buyers in Europe. As military sales ensued, primarily from the UK but also other Allied nations such as France (before the Chauchat was designed in 1915 and actually replaced it as the most common machine gun in the Great War), Lewis made a deal for BSA in England and Savage Arms in Massachusetts to manufacture the gun.
The barrel aluminium sleeve or shroud or whatever supposedly helped with air-cooling the gun, but by WW2 most Lewis gun were working very well without it. It is however super distinctive and cool looking.

Source:
James D. Julia Inc.

3

M1914 Lewis machine gun

Designed by the American colonel Isaac Newton Lewis, manufactured by Birmingham Small Arms in England. Serial Number A-37289.
47-rounds .303 British pan magazine.

An iconic WW1 weapon design if there’s any. Colonel Lewis was initially slapped with rejections by bitches and whores [sic] from the US army, so he went off to Liège in Belgium to found his own company, Armes Automatiques Lewis, and started to look for buyers in Europe. As military sales ensued, primarily from the UK but also other Allied nations such as France (before the Chauchat was designed in 1915 and actually replaced it as the most common machine gun in the Great War), Lewis made a deal for BSA in England and Savage Arms in Massachusetts to manufacture the gun.
The barrel aluminium sleeve or shroud or whatever supposedly helped with air-cooling the gun, but by WW2 most Lewis gun were working very well without it. It is however super distinctive and cool looking.

Sauce : James D. Julia Inc.

4

Smith & Wesson 10-8 Bill Davis Custom Limited Edition

Intimidating looking revolver one would expect is a magnum caliber but this one is a .38 Special. PPC guns are mainly for competition and can be of many different makes/brands and calibers. One reoccurring trait on PPC revolvers is the large custom barrel shrouds and weights that help reduce recoil and muzzle flip. Some PPC guns are quite collectable, particularly the Dan Wessons. (GRH)

2

Cohaire Arms CA89

U.S made clone of the HK SP89, this is an MP5 pistol variant. Since it is a pistol, you can’t put a forward grip on it, hence why the SP89 and it’s clones have a unique handguard/barrel shroud with a hand stop. The handguard doesn’t cover up the entire barrel since there is a cut-out at the top. The CA89 has somewhat of a mediocre reputation online due to poor quality control from the builds, which is kind of why they only run about $1,000 or so. A real HK SP89 will cost you upward of $3,500 to $4,000. (GRH)

3

Kel-Tec RFB

A bullpup rifle chambered in 7.62x51mm, this example has an interesting accessory. The owner made a custom pictainny top rail and barrel shroud. It’s different from any of the aftermarket ones you find for the RFB in that it’s actually longer and taller. It gives the RFB user a longer sight radius but also a proper cheek weld. The owner did try to auction off the whole package but it didn’t sell so maybe he kept it since it wasn’t relisted. The rail was left “in the white” so the next owner could refinish it how they wanted to. I was half tempted to buy it just for the rail but dealing with the RFB’s gas system is too much of a headache. (GRH)

3

The KIS machine pistol,

Another weapon created by the Polish Resistance during World War II, the KIS was a submachine gun or machine pistol that was modeled after the British Sten gun.  Like the Sten, the KIS was a fully automatic weapon that fired using an open bolt and was fed from a detachable magazine at the left hand side of the receiver.  The KIS, however, had some modifications that differed from the original design.  Instead of a shrouded barrel the KIS used a longer 6 inch tapered barrel.  The KIS also lacked a buttstock, instead using a pistol grip. 

The name KIS is derived from the initials of three men who designed and built the weapon.  The were produced around the Holy Cross Mountains region of southern Poland.  Essentially they were manufactured by cottage industry, with people producing parts in small workshops, attics, and basements.  Around 37 or 38 were produced altogether between 1943 and 1944.  They were all issued to the resistance group under the command of Jan Piwnik, who harassed the German Army throughout 1943 and 1944.  He was killed in action in June of 1944.

2

The Guns of Garand, Part II — The T1 and T3 Garand

In case you missed: Part I

After the failure of his primer actuated action, John Garand went back to the drawing board, beginning work on what would become the M1 Garand in 1926.  By 1927, he had built a whole new rifle, which was designated the T1 Garand (pictured above). The T1 was a semi automatic rifle in .30-06, which featured a gas operated system in which expanding gas from the discharge of the rifle was vented off from a small port near the muzzle into a gas tube, (located below the barrel, hidden by the stock), the force of which worked the action.  The new T1 featured an eight round magazine which was loaded with an en bloc clip. One major external difference between the T1 and the M1 Garand was the addition of a barrel shroud to provide cooling ventilation for the barrel.

The new T1 Garand was to be entered into US Army Ordnance trials in 1931, however, Army Ordnance threw a big curveball similar to the one which doomed Garand’s primer actuated rifles; a change in caliber.  In the 1920’s and early 1930’s, many military officials believed that a new small caliber, high velocity cartridge should be adopted.  Thus in the 1920’s, the .276 Pedersen cartridge became popular, invented by John Pedersen, then a competitor with Garand. US Army Ordnance requested that Garand redesign the T1 to fire the new .276 cartridge. The new .276 Garand was called the “T3”.  Because it fired a smaller caliber cartridge, the T3’s magazine could hold ten cartridges rather than the T1’s eight. The T3 was entered for testing in Ordnance Trials in early 1931. The T3 outcompeted dozens of rival designs, until eventually it was a competition between the T3, and a toggle lock design by John Pedersen. 

The T3 easily outcompeted the Pedersen rifle, which suffered serious reliability issues and needed to use greased cartridges in order to feed and cycle properly. The T3 was to be adopted by the military, but there was one more twist in the main development of the M1 Garand.  At first, the US Army was gung-ho for the adoption of a rifle in .276 Pedersen. Literally a day after the completion of Ordnance Board Trials, Army Chief of Staff General Douglas MacArthur intervened, detesting the adoption of the caliber because the Army had enormous stocks of .30-06 ammunition on hand. On February 25th, 1932 Adjutant General John B. Schuman ordered all work on .276 caliber rifles to cease.  As a result, the older T1 Garand was approved for field trials, and was adopted of the “Semi-Automatic Rifle, Caliber 30, M1”.  After the identification and correction of various design flaws, it was finally officially adopted in 1936.

4

PTR-91

Modified PTR-91 made to look like an HK 11 according to the seller but its not even close. It just follows the design concept, heavy barrel (still the wrong profile), bipod (wrong location & bipod), barrel shroud (should be half open for quick change) and a carry handle (wrong type of handle). PTR does not make an HK 11 style rifle, the one in the photos is a home or gunsmith build. What makes this rifle very sketchy is that there is no info on who did the build, which is important because they added the reinforcement rails on the receiver. These are very tricky to install because of the high chance of warping the receiver during the welding process. I wouldn’t buy this rifle since you may end up spending more money to correct a welding problem. (GRH)