banded rock rattlesnake

10

Went to Underground Reptiles in Florida!

1: Me with a Mexican Black Milk Snake

2: Southern Copperhead

3: Green Tree Python

4: Asian Vine Snake

5: Quince Monitor

6: Dumeril’s Monitor

7: Panda/Pied Mexican Spiny Tailed Iguana

8: Northern Pacific Rattlesnake

9: Banded Rock Rattlesnake

10: Me holding several Ball Python morphs. (Snow, Candino, Spider Banana, Pied, and Pastel Champagne)

(Crotalus lepidus klauberi) banded rock rattlesnake
Nocturnal. Secretive. Most often found hiding in rock crevices in canyons, scree slopes, or man-made road cuts. Do not typically travel far, and often spend entire lives on one particular slope or ridge. Diet consists of primarily lizards and rodents. Shy. Often do not rattle if approached, relying instead on camouflage. Most likely to be seen after a summer afternoon thunderstorm, or rain shower, basking or searching  for food. In contrast to the shyness described above, Banded Rock Rattlesnake specimens found high (>7000 ft) in the Organ Mountains of southern New Mexico are usually highly confident and defensive, rattling incessantly at the mere sight of humans. One often has to search carefully for the source of the rattling, because they are indeed expert at hiding themselves in small caves and cracks in rocky terrain.

Ovoviviparous, with females giving birth to 2-8 young in the spring. Mating occurs in the summer months, after which gravid females hibernate during the winter months.

(Crotalus lepidus klauberi) banded rock rattlesnake, green rattlesnake, green rock rattlesnake
These are nocturnal, secretive snakes. They spend most of their time hiding in rock crevices. Often found in canyons, scree slopes, or man-made road cuts. Research has shown that they do not typically travel far, and often spend their entire lives on one particular slope or ridge. Their diet consists of primarily lizards and rodents. They are quite shy snakes, often not even rattling if approached, relying instead on their camouflage to blend into the rocky habitat. They are most likely to be seen after a summer afternoon thunderstorm, or rain shower, when they come out to bask and search for food. In contract to the shyness described above, Banded Rock Rattlesnake specimens found high (>7000 ft) in the Organ Mountains of southern New Mexico are usually highly confident and defensive, rattling incessantly at the mere sight of humans. One often has to search carefully for the source of the rattling, because they are indeed expert at hiding themselves in small caves and cracks in rocky terrain.