bamboo harvester

Mr Ed (1961-66) Full TV Series

External image

Comedian George Burns financed the original pilot for Mister Ed which was shot at his McCadden Studio in Hollywood at a cost of $70,000. Scott McKay played Wilbur. Jack Benny was also involved behind the scenes. Unable to sell the show to a network, Lubin decided to sell the show into syndication first. He managed to get single sponsor identification for the program on over 100 stations. The show was recast with Alan Young in the lead. Production began in November 1960, although Lubin did not direct early episodes because he was working in Europe on a film. The first 26 episodes were well received enough for the show to be picked up by CBS. The title role of Mister Ed, a talking palomino, was played by gelding Bamboo Harvester and voiced by former Western film actor Allan Lane. The role of Ed’s owner, a genial but somewhat klutzy architect named Wilbur Post, was played by Alan Young. The other main character throughout the series is Wilbur’s generally tolerant young wife, Carol (Connie Hines). The Posts also have two sets of neighbors, to whom Ed delights in making Wilbur appear as eccentric as possible. They included the Addisons, Roger (Larry Keating) and his wife Kay (Edna Skinner), who both appeared from the pilot episode until Keating’s death in 1963; thereafter, Skinner continued appearing as Kay, without mention of Roger’s absence, until the neighbors were recast. During this period, Kay’s brother Paul Fenton (Jack Albertson), who had made occasional appearances before, appears. Following the Addisons, the Posts’ new neighbors were Col. Gordon Kirkwood, USAF (Ret.), Wilbur’s former commanding officer (Leon Ames), and his wife Winnie (Florence MacMichael). Ed’s ability to talk was never explained, or ever contemplated much on the show. In the first episode, when Wilbur expresses an inability to understand the situation, Ed offers the show’s only remark on the subject: “Don’t try. It’s bigger than both of us!” The horse Bamboo Harvester portrayed Ed throughout the run. Ed’s stablemate, a quarterhorse named Pumpkin, also served as Bamboo Harvester’s stunt double for the show. This horse later appeared again in the television series Green Acres. Bamboo Harvester’s trainer was Les Hilton. To create the impression that Ed was having a conversation, Hilton initially used a thread technique he had employed for Lubin’s earlier Mule films; in time, though, this became unnecessary. As actor Alan Young recounted: “It was initially done by putting a piece of nylon thread in his mouth. But Ed actually learned to move his lips on cue when the trainer touched his hoof. In fact, he soon learned to do it when I stopped talking during a scene! Ed was very smart.” Reports circulated during and after the show’s run that the talking effect was achieved by crew members applying peanut butter to the horse’s gums. Alan Young said in later interviews that he invented the story. “Al Simon and Arthur Lubin, the producers, suggested we keep the method [of making the horse appear to talk] a secret because they thought kids would be disappointed if they found out the technical details of how it was done, so I made up the peanut butter story, and everyone bought it.” Young added that Bamboo Harvester saw trainer Les Hilton as the disciplinarian father figure. When scolded by Hilton for missing a cue, the horse would move to Young for comfort, treating the actor as a mother figure. Hilton told Young this was a positive development. The theme song received renewed publicity twenty years after the show went off the air when Jim Brown, a preacher from South Point, Ohio, claimed in May 1986 that it contained “satanic messages” if heard in reverse. Brown and his colleague Greg Hudson claimed that the phrases “Someone sung this song for Satan” and “the source is Satan” would be audible. At their behest teenagers burned over 300 records and cassettes of secular music with alleged satanic messages.

2

Mythology and Narutoverse

“Princess Kaguya (Kaguya Hime, 赫映姫 or 輝夜姫)

also known as The Tale of the Bamboo Cutter (竹取物語Taketori Monogatari), is a 10th-century Japanese Folktale. It is considered the oldest extant Japanese narrative.

It primarily details the life of a mysterious girl called Kaguya-hime, who was discovered as a baby inside the stalk of a glowing bamboo plant. She is said to be from Tsuki-no-Miyako (月の都 "The Capital of the Moon”).

One day, while walking in the bamboo forest, an old, childless bamboo cutter called Taketori no Okina (竹取翁, “the Old Man who Harvests Bamboo”) came across a mysterious, shining stalk of bamboo. After cutting it open, he found inside it an infant the size of his thumb. He rejoiced to find such a beautiful girl and took her home. He and his wife raised her as their own child and named her Kaguya-hime (かぐや姫 accurately, Nayotake-no-Kaguya-hime “princess of flexible bamboos scattering light”). Thereafter, Taketori no Okina found that whenever he cut down a stalk of bamboo, inside would be a small nugget of gold. Soon he became rich. Kaguya-hime grew from a small baby into a woman of ordinary size and extraordinary beauty. At first, Taketori no Okina tried to keep her away from outsiders, but over time the news of her beauty spread.“

Naruto Challenge [30/30]