bakhchysaray

Ukraine: This is the Bakhchysaray Masjid in the Crimean region, which is now all over the news for the possibility of a Russian-Ukranian war!

What many don’t know was that this was a Muslim majority region under the Ottoman empire, and it was the one responsible for collecting the Jizyah from the Russians for several centuries.

However, in the last century, the Soviet has practiced ethnic cleansing against the Crimean Muslims under the false accusation that they were spies for the Germans, so they mass murdered and mass deported millions to Central Asia, resulting in only 20% of the region being Muslims today, about 400,000, and if things escalate, they will have no choice but to be part of this horror all over again, may Allah protect them and protect people from the trials of war!

flickr

Khansky Palace, Bakhchysarai, Ukraine  by Andrew Karter

old woman’s summer

for day 1 of @aphukraineweek - “family”

1860s-ish. Ukraine and her little brother talk one evening. (some notes here)


“It’s harder than you think,” Russia says, sinking into an armchair. The rest of his empire is asleep, or ought to be; Ukraine’s just gotten back from another trip, this time as Russia’s envoy to Sadik in Istanbul – but that’s a whole different story.

She’s just closed the door behind her, shutting out the night. It’s warm, for early October, anyway. The Antonivka apples will be just starting to ripen back home. Ukraine shakes the damp fog from her shoulders and stamps the mud from her boots.

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The brave face cannot hide genuine fear among Tatars that Russian rule could mean curtailed freedoms.

In a shop at the end of a potholed dirt road in Belogorsk lined with modest bungalows, manager Niyara, who did not want to give her surname, said people had been stockpiling food.

“People are really worried,” she said. “I have a child, and I myself am scared.”

Niyara fears that Russian Crimeans may now try to seize back property from Tatars that they believe is theirs.

“A lot of our houses are unregistered, and Russian regulations on that kind of thing are very, very strict.”

-Crimea’s Return to Russia Leaves Tatars Fearful of Future