bag-of-bones

this is the first song i ever wrote. i started writing songs after high school which is late compared to my band friends, i was living in Turkey it was morning and i was still fucking drunk, idk why but i sat at the keyboard and started writing this, and by the time it was done my heart was pounding like i just saw the rest of my life. i was fucking doomed. anyway, happy monday, fam. kill this week.

The Signs As Stephen King Novels

Aries: The Shining

Taurus: Cujo

Gemini: The Dark Half

Cancer: Misery

Leo: Bag of Bones

Virgo: Dreamcatcher

Libra: The Dead Zone

Scorpio: IT

Sagittarius: Insomnia

Capricorn: Under the Dome

Aquarius: Needful Things

Pisces: Carrie

theguardian.com
Ten things I learned about writing from Stephen King
The novelist James Smythe, who has been analysing the work of Stephen King for the Guardian since 2012, on the lessons he has drawn from the master of horror fiction
By James Smythe

Stephen King is an All-Time Great, arguably one of the most popular novelists the world has ever seen. And there’s a good chance that he’s inspired more people to start writing than any other living writer. So, as the Guardian and King’s UK publisher Hodder launch a short story competition – to be judged by the master himself – here are the ten most important lessons to learn from his work.

1. Write whatever the hell you like

King might be best known – or, rather, best regarded – as a writer of horror novels, but really, his back catalogue is crammed with every genre you can think of. There are thrillers (Misery, Gerald’s Game), literary novels (Bag Of Bones, Different Seasons), crime procedurals (Mr Mercedes), apocalypse narratives (The Stand), fantasy (Eyes Of The Dragon, The Dark Tower series) … He’s even written what I think of as being one of the greatest Young Adult novels of all time: The Long Walk. Perhaps the only genre or audience he hasn’t really touched so far is comedy, but most of his work features moments that show his deft touch with humour. It’s clear that King does what he wants, when he wants, and his constant readers – the term he calls his, well, constant readers – will follow him wherever he goes.

2. The scariest thing isn’t necessarily what’s underneath the bed

Horror is a curious thing. What scares one person won’t necessarily scare another. And while there might be moments in his horror novels that tread towards the more conventional ideas of what some find terrifying, for the most part, the truly scary aspects are those that deal with humanity itself. Ghosts drive people to madness, telekinetic girls destroy whole towns with their powers, clowns … well, clowns are just bloody terrifying full stop. But the true crux of King’s ability to scare is finding the thing that his readers are actually worried about, and bringing that to the fore. If you’re writing horror, don’t just think about what goes bump in the night; think about what that bump might drive people to do afterwards.

3. Don’t be scared of transparency

One of my favourite things about King’s short story collections are the little notes about each tale that he puts into the text. The history of them, the context for the idea, how the writing process actually worked. They’re not only invaluable material for aspiring writers – because exactly how many drafts does it take to reach a decent story? King knows! – but they’re also brilliant nuggets of insight into King himself. Some people might think that it’s better off knowing nothing about authors when they read their work, but for King, his heart is on his sleeve. In his latest collection, The Bazaar of Broken Dreams, King gets more in-depth than ever, talking about what inspired the stories in such an honest way that it couldn’t have come from another writer’s pen. Which brings us to …

4. Write what you know. Sort of. Sometimes

Write what you know is the most common writing tip you’ll find anywhere. It’s nonsense, really, because if we all did that we’d end up with terribly boring novels about writers staring out of windows waiting for inspiration to hit. (If you like those, incidentally, head straight for the literary fiction section of your nearest bookshop.) But King understands that experience is something which can be channelled into your work, and should be at every opportunity. Aspects of his life – addiction, teaching, his near-fatal car accident, rock and roll, ageing – have cropped up in his work over and over, in ways that aren’t always obvious, but often help to drive the story. That’s something every writer can use, because it’s through these truths that real emotions can be writ large on the page.

5. Aim big. Or small

King’s written some mammoth books, and they’re often about mammoth things. The Stand takes readers into an apocalypse, with every stage of it laid out on the page until the final fantastical showdown. It deals with a horror that hits a group of characters twice in their lives, showing us how years and years of experience can change people. And The Dark Tower is a seven (or eight, or more, if you count the short stories set in its world) part series that takes in so many different genres of writing it’s dizzying. When he needs to, King aims really big, and sometimes that’s what you have to do to tell a story. At the other end of the spectrum, some of King’s most enduring stories – Rita Hayworth & Shawshank Redemption, The Mist – have come from his shorter works. He traps small groups of characters in single locations and lets the story play out how it will. The length of the story you’re telling should dictate the size of the book. Doesn’t matter if it’s forty thousand words or two hundred, King doesn’t waste a word.

6. Write all the time. And write a lot

King’s published – wait for it – 55 novels, 11 collections of stories, 5 non-fiction works, 7 novellas and 9 assorted other pieces (including illustrated works and comic books). That’s over a period of 41 years. That’s an average of two books a year. Which is, I must admit, a pretty giddying amount. That’s years of reading (or rereading, if you’re as foolishly in awe of him as I am). But he’s barely stopped for breath. This year has seen three books published by him, which makes me feel a little ashamed. Still, at my current rate of writing, I might catch up with him sometime next century. And while not every book has found the same critical and commercial success, they’ve all got their fans.

7. Voice is just as important as content

King’s a writer who understands that a story needs to begin before it’s actually told. It begins in the voice of the novel: is it first person, or third? Is it past or present tense? Is it told through multiple narrators, or just the one? He’s a master at understanding exactly why each story is told the way it’s told. Sure, he might dress it up as something simple – the story finding the voice it needs, or vice versa – but through his books you can see that he’s tried pretty much everything, and can see why each voice worked with the story he was telling.

8. And Form is just as important as voice

King isn’t really thought of as an experimental novelist, which is grossly unfair. Some of King’s more daring novels have taken on really interesting forms. Be it The Green Mile’s fragmented, serialised narrative; or the dual publication of The Regulators and Desperation – novels which featured the same characters in very different situations, with unsettling parallels between the stories that unfolded for them; or even Carrie’s mixed-media narrative, with sections of the story told as interview or newspaper extract. All of these novels have played with the way they’re presented on the page to find the perfect medium for telling those stories. Really, the lesson here from King is to not be afraid to play.

9. You don’t have to be yourself

Some of King’s greatest works in the early years of his career weren’t published by King himself. They were in the name of Richard Bachman, his slightly grislier pseudonym. The Long Walk, Thinner, The Running Man – these are books that dealt with a nastier side of things than King did in his properly attributed work. Because, maybe it’s good to have a voice that allows us to let the real darkness out, with no judgments. (And then maybe, as King eventually did in The Dark Half, it’s good to kill that voice on the page … )

10. Read On Writing. Now

This is the most important tip in the list. In 2000, King published On Writing, a book that sits in the halfway space between autobiography and writing manual. It’s full of details about his process, about how he wrote his books, channelled his demons and overcame his challenges. It’s one of the few books about writing that are actually worth their salt, mainly because it understands that it’s about a personal experience, and readers might find that useful. There’s no universal truths when it comes to writing. One person’s process would be a nightmare for somebody else. Some people spend years labouring on nearly perfect first drafts; some people get a first draft written in six weeks, and then spend the next year destroying it and rebuilding it. On Writing tells you how King does it, to help you to find your own. Even if you’re not a fan of his books, it’s invaluable to the in-development writer. Heck, it’s invaluable to all writers.

stephen king quotes for the signs:

aries: “control the things you can control. let everything else take a flying fuck at you and if you must go down, go down with your guns blazing. - the drawing of the three

taurus: “we never cease wanting what we want, whether it’s good for us or not. -  full dark, no stars

gemini: “no one can tell what goes on in between the person you were and the person you become. no one can chart that blue and lonely section of hell. there are no maps of the change. you just come out the other side. - the stand

cancer: “the mind can calculate, but the spirit yearns, and the heart knows what the heart knows. - cell

leo: “go toward all the life there is with all the courage you can find and all the belief you can muster. be true, be brave, stand. - IT

virgo: “sometimes the embers are better than the campfire. -  the green mile

libra: “i think that real friendship always makes us feel such sweet gratitude, because the world almost always seems like a very hard desert, and the flowers that grow there seem to grow against such high odds. - the eyes of the dragon

scorpio: “it’s a dance. and sometimes they turn the lights off in this ballroom. but we’ll dance anyway, you and i. even in the dark. especially in the dark.-danse macabre

sagittarius: “what comes in when daylight leaves is a kind of certainty: that beneath the skin there is a secret, some mystery both black and bright. you feel this mystery in every breath, you see it in every shadow, you expect to plunge into it at every turn of a step. - bag of bones

capricorn: “but see that you get on. that’s your job in this hard world, to keep your love alive and see that you get on, no matter what. pull your act together and just go on. - the shining

aquarius: some birds are not meant to be caged, that’s all. their feathers are too bright, their songs too sweet and wild.- shawshank redemption (different seasons)

pisces: the concept of dreaming is known to the waking mind but to the dreamer there is no waking, no real world, no sanity; there is only the screaming bedlam of sleep. - rose madder

Random Loot Table

I consistently have players looting conquered foes, random strangers, ruined villages, etc.. And the truth is I almost NEVER know what they’re going to find. Usually I just spout some nonsense at the top of my head and it often ends up being dull, leaving my players less likely to look for items while adventuring in the future. I created this table to help give me a guideline for random loot, and it lets players feel lucky when they roll high and find something unexpected.

(Click Keep Reading below the image for more specific information and a text version of the chart at the bottom)

Keep reading

(Love) Letters

Harry Potter,
Last chance to accept my proposal of friendship. You don’t want to make a mistake you cannot erase.
Draco Malfoy.

Hey Putter,
I’d love the hit you with a few golf balls.
Malfoy.

Hey Potty,
Were you born that ugly, or did you get punched in the face too many times by your muggle family?
Malfoy.

Hey Scarhead,
How’s your frizzy-haired Mudblood girlfriend? And your pet orangutan?
Malfoy.

Hey Arselmouth,
I didn’t realise specky gits enjoyed murdering Hufflepuffs with snakes? I’m almost impressed.
Malfoy.

Hey Orphan,
Missing Mummy and Daddy?
Malfoy.

Hey Princess,
Did you hurt your head real bad when you fainted, or are you already damaged beyond repair?
Malfoy.

Hey Prickter,
I know you’re up to something. I know what Hagrid’s doing.
Malfoy.

Hey Prince,
Didn’t get enough attention last year? Had to cheat your way into championship? I don’t think you’ll last 5 minutes.
Malfoy.

Hey Porkie,
Are you still starving yourself? You’re like a bag of bones. Except with less fashion sense.
Malfoy.

Hey Pisster,
I can’t believe you’re still alive! Maybe die next time?
Malfoy.

Hey Pothead,
Is your little Mudblood still crying over a couple of words? Just learn, you must not tell lies.
Malfoy.

Hey Plonker,
Umbridge is looking for you.
Malfoy.

Hey Plantpot,
Umbridge can’t get into the room. She doesn’t know how.
Malfoy.

Potter,
Stop following me.
Malfoy.

Potter,
Seriously, stop following me. I’ll fucking kill you.
Malfoy.

Potter,
You almost killed me.
Draco.

Potter,
Where are you? Why did you leave?
Malfoy.

Potter,
These letters just keep getting brought back. Where are you? Are you dead?
Malfoy.

Potter,
Please come back.
Malfoy.

Potter,
I knew it was you.
Malfoy.

Potter,
You were in my house. You saw my house.
Malfoy.

Potter,
You can’t die. Please don’t die.
Malfoy.

Potter,
You fucking saved me.
Malfoy.

Potter,
You’re dead. You’re gone.
Malfoy.

Potter,
You aren’t dead.
Malfoy.

Potter,
You did it.
Malfoy.

Hello Potter,
Thank you, so much, for saving me. Thank you for saving my mother. Thank you for saving the entire wizarding world. I’m sorry for everything I did. And, I-
Sincerely, Malfoy.

Mr Potter,
Thank you so much for returning my wand.
Draco Malfoy.

Potter,
I don’t know how you did it, but thanks.
Malfoy.

Potter,
How do you unlock the staff room again?
Malfoy.

Hello Potter,
Granger is forcing me to ask you if you’d care to join us for drinks on Friday night. (You can say no.)
Malfoy.

Potter,
Are you still coming tonight?
Malfoy.

Hey Potter,
Thanks for last night. I’m sorry you had to see me like that.
Malfoy.

Hey Potter,
Do you want to go for a pint tonight, after work? I’ll pay?
Malfoy.

Hey Potter,
What time did you say you’re picking me up?
Draco.

Hey Harry,
Yesterday was amazing.
Draco.
Ps. We were always going to win!

Harry,
Are you sure I’m supposed to feel like this? Are you sure it was a muggle film? There was no misery potion involved?
Draco.

Harry,
Where did you learn to cook!?
Draco.

Harry,
Happy Valentine’s Day!
Draco.

Harry,
I miss you. When are you home?
Draco.

Harry,
I love you.
Draco.

Harry,
Are you sure this is a good idea? Last chance to back out?!
Draco.

Harry,
I’ve forgotten my keys..
Draco.

Harry,
YOU LEFT LAUNDRY ON THE FLOOR! AGAIN!!
Draco.

Harry,
Will you cook tonight? Pretty please?
D.

Harry,
You forgot your paperwork. I’ll send Hedwig.
D.

Hey Harry,
Come and find me, I’ve got your coffee!
D.

Harry,
Where’s my tie!?
D.

-

Marry me, Draco?
Harry.

Jehan who writes poetry like a fifteenth century monk.

Jehan who, given on the day, wears a fine rosé gold dust powder on his cheekbones, along with a shredded hippie vest.

Jehan, the kind of guy who drops his bag and twenty or so bones tumble out and he apologizes like it’s an everyday occurrence.

“Why didn’t jehan make it to the meeting tonight?” “It’s Oscar Wilde’s death day,” “oh, poor thing,”

Jehan, who catches pneumonia from staying in a graveyard through the night in the middle of January

“John Keats died at 26 as an accomplished poet, I have accomplished far less at 21,”

Who writes his poetry with a customized red falcon feather quill and a blood red ink pressed from the berries in a certain remote berry farm in the appalachian mountains

101 mission briefings for Conspiracist:

  • A German-style garden gnome with the left eye removed
  • A USB thumb drive containing a single photo of an orange kitten with an American $100 bill in its mouth
  • A black fedora with a plastic fork in the hatband in place of a feather
  • A High Priestess tarot card (from the Marseilles deck, if the players think to ask) with a moustache and goatee scribbled on in black felt pen
  • A box of Boston cream donuts, one short of the full dozen
  • A pair of pre-1983 Barbie dolls, bound together at the wrist with a pair of tiny plastic handcuffs
  • A self-sealing freezer bag filled with mouse bones
  • A V2-brand vape pen and a half-litre bottle of vanilla rootbeer float flavoured vape fluid
  • A pair of casino dice with faces numbered 0-5 rather than 1-6
  • 144 cases of frozen English muffins (72 muffins per case), delivered by express courier

(Clearly we’re well short of 101 - feel free to add your own!)