baden palmette tiara

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The Baden Palmette Tiara of Denmark

Description:  The Baden Palmette tiara was made by Koch and showcases delicate diamond encrusted palmette motifs that resemble hearts.

History:
The Baden Palmette tiara was given to Princess Luise of Prussia from her father, Kaiser Wilhelm I, on the occasion of her 1856 marriage to Grand Duke Frederick of Baden. Their daughter, Viktoria of Baden, later married Crown Prince Gustaf of Sweden (later King Gustaf V) and the tiara went with her to Stockholm. When Viktoria (later Queen Victoria of Sweden) died, her granddaughter Princess Ingrid inherited the tiara and later took it with her when she married Crown Prince Frederick of Denmark and Iceland (later King Frederick IX of Denmark). Queen Ingrid’s daughter, Queen Margrethe II, now wears it frequently.

Provenance:

  • Grand Duchess Luise of Baden (1856)
  • Queen Victoria of Sweden (inherited from her mother, 1923)
  • Queen Ingrid of Denmark (inherited from her grandmother, 1930)
  • Queen Margrethe II (inherited from her mother, 2000)

Notable occasions:

  • Queen Margrethe (2012 Danish Ruby Jubilee, gala performance)
  • Queen Margrethe (2001 Norwegian Royal Wedding)
  • Princess Alexandra of Sayn-Wittgenstein-Berleburg (Queen Margrethe’s 60th birthday celebrations, 2000)

Also worn by:

  • Princess Benedikte

Thank you to various royal jewel blogs for the information.

Danish Crown Jewels - The Baden Palmette Tiara

First owned by Princess Luise of Prussia as a wedding gift from her father, Kaiser Wilhelm I, when she married Grand Duke Frederik of Baden in 1856. The romantic piece, whose palmette motifs join to resemble hearts, was given by Luise to her daughter, Queen Victoria of Sweden, and then passed along to Victoria’s granddaughter, Queen Ingrid of Denmark. Queen Margrethe inherited the tiara on her mother’s death in 2000.

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Royal Tiara Challenge

Day 3: Favourite Tiara of Denmark

The Baden Palmette Tiara

Made by Koch jewelers, the diamond tiara was originally given to Princess Louise of Prussia (1838-1923) by her father, German Emperor Wilhelm I. It was a wedding gift, marking her 1856 nuptials to the future Grand Duke of Baden. It’s a romantic tiara with a design of hearts created by palmette motifs, and so a fitting gift for a wedding. Small diamond flowers with yellow-toned centers sit at the base of the tiara between the hearts. From Baden, the tiara traveled to Sweden courtesy of Louise’s daughter Queen Victoria of Sweden (1862-1930), the consort of King Gustav V. Victoria left the tiara to her granddaughter Ingrid, better known as Queen Ingrid of Denmark (1910-2000), wife of King Frederik IX. Ingrid brought the tiara to its current home in Denmark.

Princess Margrethe of Denmark and Count Henri de Laborde de Monpezat at a gala hosted by the French Embassy to celebrate their upcoming wedding. (June 7, 1967)

The princess’ mother, Queen Ingrid, can be seen on the left side of the photo. Her father, King Frederick IX is to the right.

Princess Margrethe wore an embroidered white gown by Balmain and the Baden Palmette tiara.