badass-and-beautiful

heart4hawkeye  asked:

Would you rant more on the differences between the "born sexy yesterday" trope and Wonder Woman? Because I definitely some similarities and some differences but couldn't put words to all of them, and was discussing it with a friend, and could find the words to describe the differences.

Originally posted by casnelson17

Potential Spoilers Ahead!

Okay, let’s break down piece by piece why Wonder Woman is not an example of the Born Sexy Yesterday trope. 

The Born Sexy Yesterday Trope is …

when a naive yet capable woman

I won’t argue that Diana isn’t naive.  She’s very naive when it comes to philosophical ideas like the nature of war and humanity.  That, however, is not the kind of naivety that makes this trope work.  

Diana is not naive about sex/sexuality. People (usually women) who fall into into the Born Sexy Yesterday trope rely on their love interest (usually a man) to teach about love and sexual attraction because they have never experienced it before.  Diana knows what sex and sexual pleasure are (and probably experienced them before Steve came into the picture), she doesn’t need Steve or anyone else to teach her.  When men Diana isn’t interested in express attraction to her, she’s able to recognize it and turns them down.  When men she is interested in do, she knowingly reciprocates and the relationship progresses on her terms.

Diana’s naivety isn’t used to make her more desirable.  Innocence, virginity, and naivety are part of the appeal of women who fall into the Born Sexy Yesterday trope.  While Diana’s naivety doesn’t detract from her appeal, it’s not the driving component of it.  Steve (and the audience) fall in love with Diana because she’s a beautiful, badass warrior with a big heart, not because she’s naive.

Culture Shock is not the same thing as naivety.  Diana not knowing what revolving doors and ice cream are doesn’t mean she’s naive.  It means she spent her entire life in a culture that doesn’t have those things.  Yes, there are things she doesn’t understand that Steve has to teach her, but there are also moments where Diana has to teach Steve about her culture.  Steve is equally as confused and fascinated by Themyscira as Diana is about Man’s World.  And you don’t see that turnaround very often, if ever, in the Born Sexy Yesterday trope.

is the over-sexualized love interest

There is a difference between being sexy and being sexualized.  Diana is extremely gorgeous and many of her outfits show some skin, but she’s never over-sexualized.  No one ever walks in on her while she changes, allowing the audience to see her in a state of undress, and there aren’t any gratuitous upskirt shots or close ups of her chest or rear.  Basically, unlike women who fall into the Born Sexy Yesterday trope, Diana exists to be more than just eye candy.

Also, there is a difference in having a love interest and being a love interest.  To have a love interest is to fall in love with someone over the course of a story while also doing other things.  To be a love interest is to serve as an object of desire and have little or no role outside of that.  Diana falling in love with Steve was just one part of her story.  An important part that had a big impact on the story, yes, but it wasn’t the only thing she did.  Much of her growth and development as a character happened outside of that.  Being a strong, female character, and being a woman in love with a man aren’t mutually exclusive.

And as for ‘Diana falls in love with the first man she meets so it’s the Born Sexy Yesterday trope’, that’s a misleading oversimplification (not to mention a little biphobic).  Diana doesn’t become immediately smitten with Steve the moment she lays eyes on him because she’s never seen a man before. Their relationship grows and develops over time until they both mutually fall in love with each other.  Diana also meets other men throughout the movie and develops relationships with them that aren’t romantic.  She doesn’t fall for every single man she meets.  She’s also canonically bisexual and she may have had relationships before Steve.  Meaning her relationship with Steve would be her first with a man, but not her first ever.  

 to an average, male protagonist.

First off Steve Trevor is above average, so jot that down.

He’s also not the protagonist.  There’s a reason this movie’s called Wonder Woman and not The Saga of Steve Trevor. This is Diana’s story. She is the heart and soul of the movie, and she doesn’t exist to play second fiddle to Steve.  The point of the Born Sexy Yesterday trope is to exist as an object of affection in another person’s story.  Maybe it can still work when the protagonist and the person the trope applies to are one in the same, but I can’t think of any examples. 


So yeah, there’s some elements of the Born Sexy Yesterday trope in the movie, but like how having eggs, flour, and butter doesn’t mean you have a cake, having those elements in the movie doesn’t mean you have the trope.

The girl squad has been kind of distancing from each other but I would love to see a scene where they all notice how their badass Muslim beautiful friend who keeps it cool at all times, who gets shit done 100% finally breaks down and shows how vulnerable she has been and how much she needs them to lift her up.

Sana was Noora’s rock when it came to Dickhelm, she literally was Vilde’s knight in shining armor several times (that scene where she takes her bridal style kills me everytime), remained Isak’s support and Even’s cheer squad and defended Eva from Iben’s physical agression.

This girl needs a big hug right now. She has been keeping a turmoil inside her and it’s gonna blow up when no one else expects it.