badakhshan

5

Badakhshan, Afghanistan 

Badakhshan was an important trading center during antiquity. Lapis lazuli was traded exclusively from there as early as the second half of the 4th millennium BC. Badakhshan was an important region when the Silk Road passed through. Its significance is its geo-economic role in trades of silk and ancient commodities transactions between the East and West.

“Throne of my lonely niche, my wealth, my love, my moonlight.
My most sincere friend, my confidant, my very existence, my Sultan, my one and only love.
The most beautiful among the beautiful…
My springtime, my merry faced love, my daytime, my sweetheart, laughing leaf…
My plants, my sweet, my rose, the one only who does not distress me in this world…
My Istanbul, my Caraman, the earth of my Anatolia
My Badakhshan, my Baghdad and Khorasan
My woman of the beautiful hair, my love of the slanted brow, my love of eyes full of mischief…
I’ll sing your praises always
I, lover of the tormented heart, Muhibbi of the eyes full of tears, I am happy.”

Poem written by Suleiman the Magnificent for his wife, Hürrem Sultan

2

HISTORY MEME: six women > Haseki Hurrem Sultan

Hürrem Sultan (Turkish pronunciation: [hyɾˈɾem suɫˈtaːn], Ottoman Turkish: خرم سلطان, c. 1500 – 18 April 1558, birthname unknown, according to later traditions either Alexandra Lisowska/La Rossa or Anastasia[3]), also known as Roxelana, was the favorite consort and later the legal wife of Ottoman Sultan Suleiman the Magnificent and the mother of Şehzade Mehmed, Mihrimah Sultan, Şehzade Abdullah, Sultan Selim II, Şehzade Bayezid and Şehzade Cihangir of the Ottoman Empire. She was one of the most powerful women in Ottoman history and a prominent figure during the era known as the Sultanate of Women. She achieved power and influenced the politics of the Ottoman Empire through her husband and played an active role in state affairs of the Empire. She was known mainly as Haseki Hürrem Sultan or Hürrem Haseki Sultan; also known as Roxolena, Roxolana, Roxelane, Rossa, Ružica; in Turkish as Hürrem (from Persian: خرم‎ Khurram, “the cheerful one”); and in Arabic as Karima (Arabic: كريمة‎, “the noble one”). “Roxelana” might be not a proper name but a nickname, referring to her Ukrainian heritage (cf. the common contemporary name “Ruslana”); “Roxolany” or “Roxelany” was one of the names of Ukrainians, East Slavs, inhabitants of the present Ukraine, up to the 15th century, after the ancient Roxolani. Thus her nickname would literally mean “The Ruthenian One”. Modern sources do not contain information on Roxelana’s childhood, limiting themselves to a mention of her Ukrainian origin. In the middle of the 16th century, the ambassador of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania in the Crimean khanate Mikhalon Lytvyn in the composition of 1548–1551 “About customs of Tatars, Lithuanians and Moscow” (Latin: De moribus tartarorum, lituanorum et moscorum) at the description of trade specifies that “[…] the most beloved wife of the present Turkish emperor - mother of his primogenital [son] who will govern after him, was kidnapped from our land”. [6] According to late 16th-century and early 17th-century sources, such as the Polish poet Samuel Twardowski (died 1661), who researched the subject in Turkey, Hürrem was seemingly born to a father who was an Ukrainian Orthodox priest.[7][8][9] She was born in the town of Rohatyń, 68 km southeast of Lviv, a major city of the Ruthenian Voivodeship in the Crown of the Kingdom of Poland (today in Western Ukraine).[9] In the 1520s Crimean Tatars captured her during one of their frequent raids into this region, took her as a slave (probably first to the Crimean city of Kaffa, a major centre of the slave trade, then to Constantinople) and selected her for Suleiman’s harem.[9][7] She quickly came to the attention of her master, and attracted the jealousy of her rivals. She soon proved to be Suleiman’s favorite consort or Haseki Sultan. Hürrem’s influence over the Sultan soon became legendary. She was to bear the majority of Suleiman’s children and in an astonishing break with tradition, she was eventually freed. Breaking with two centuries of Ottoman tradition,[10] a former concubine had thus become the legal wife of the Sultan, much to the astonishment of observers in the palace and the city.[11] It made Suleiman the first Ottoman emperor to have a wed wife since Orhan Gazi and strengthened Hürrem’s position in the palace and eventually led to one of her sons, Selim, inheriting the empire. Letter of Hürrem Sultan to Sigismund II Augustus, congratulating him for his accession to the throne in 1549. In the Istanbul harem, Hürrem Sultan was a very influential rival for Mahidevran Sultan. Hürrem gave birth to her first son Mehmed in 1521 (who died in 1543) and then 4 more sons,destroying Mahidevran’s status of being the mother of the sultan’s only son.[12] The rivalry between the two women was partially suppressed by Ayşe Hafsa Sultan, Suleiman’s mother,[13] but after her death in 1534, as a result of the bitter rivalry a fight between the two women broke out, with Mahidevran beating Hürrem. This angered Suleiman, who subsequently sent Mahidevran to live with her son, Şehzade Mustafa, in the provincial capital of Manisa. This exile was shown officially as the traditional training of heir apparents, Sanjak Beyliği. Many years later, towards the end of Suleiman’s long reign, the rivalry between his sons became evident. Furthermore, both Hürrem Sultan and the grand vizier Rüstem Pasha (Hürrem’s son-in-law) turned him against Mustafa and Mustafa was accused of causing unrest. During the campaign against Safavid Persia in 1553, because of a fear of rebellion, Sultan Suleiman ordered the execution of Mustafa.[14] After the death of Mustafa, Mahidevran Gülbahar lost her state in the palace (as being the mother of the heir apparent) and moved to Bursa.[12] Suleiman also allowed Hürrem Sultan to remain with him at court for the rest of her life, breaking another tradition—that when imperial heirs came of age, they would be sent along with the imperial concubine who bore them to govern remote provinces of the Empire, never to return unless their progeny succeeded to the throne (Sanjak Beyliği).[15] Hürrem also acted as Suleiman’s advisor on matters of state, and seems to have had an influence upon foreign affairs and international politics.[5] Two of her letters to King Sigismund II Augustus of Poland have been preserved, and during her lifetime, the Ottoman Empire generally had peaceful relations with the Polish state within a Polish–Ottoman alliance. Under his pen name, Muhibbi, Sultan Suleiman composed this poem for Hürrem Sultan: “Throne of my lonely niche, my wealth, my love, my moonlight. My most sincere friend, my confidant, my very existence, my Sultan, my one and only love. The most beautiful among the beautiful… My springtime, my merry faced love, my daytime, my sweetheart, laughing leaf… My plants, my sweet, my rose, the one only who does not distress me in this world… My Constantinople, my Caraman, the earth of my Anatolia My Badakhshan, my Baghdad and Khorasan My woman of the beautiful hair, my love of the slanted brow, my love of eyes full of mischief… I’ll sing your praises always I, lover of the tormented heart, Muhibbi of the eyes full of tears, I am happy.”

Roxelana's off to steal your man

Hürrem Sultan: She Came, She Saw, She Conquered

In the early 16th century, Crimean Tatars raided a Ukrainian village. One of the survivors of the attack was a young, red-haired woman whose father may have been a priest; her name is lost to us today, though it has been speculated to be Aleksandra or Anastasia. Her good looks—probably her hair in truth, as some reported that she was beautiful and some said she was plain, and neither can be trusted—had her thrust into the slave trade. Eventually she ended up in Istanbul, bought for the Sultan Suleyman’s harem.

Hürrem aka Roxelana aka one of the most badass people nobody talks about.

Keep reading

burada insan yalnızdır.
sonsuzluğa doğru uzanır gölge, bu yalnızlıkta.
beni arıyorsanız eğer,
yavaş ve yumuşak gelin ki,
yalnızlığımın ince çinisi
çatlamasın.

Sohrab Sepehri

Görsel :  Tajik Woman In Badakhshan, Afghanistan.

Throne of my lonely niche, my wealth, my love, my moonlight.

My most sincere friend, my confidant, my very existence, my Sultan, my one and only love.
The most beautiful among the beautiful…
My springtime, my merry faced love, my daytime, my sweetheart, laughing leaf…
My plants, my sweet, my rose, the one only who does not distress me in this world…
My Constantinople, my Caraman, the earth of my Anatolia
My Badakhshan, my Baghdad and Khorasan
My woman of the beautiful hair, my love of the slanted brow, my love of eyes full of mischief…
I’ll sing your praises always

I, lover of the tormented heart, Muhibbi of the eyes full of tears, I am happy.

— 

Muhibbi (nom de plume of Suleiman I) 

partial translation of 16th century love poem to Hürrem Sultan Roxelana