bad unit

anonymous asked:

What would it be like after sarumi started dating, yatas mom insisted them coming over for a few days. And when they arive, momsaki hugs misaki and says "my son" with so much love and then w/o hesitation she hugs saru and says "my other son" with just as much love. saru & misaki's reaction?

I could almost see Yata’s mom doing that even if Fushimi and Yata weren’t dating, she clearly thinks highly of Fushimi when he’s just Yata’s friend and I think she probably has some idea of that fact that Fushimi hasn’t got much in the way of a real family. When Yata tells her that he and Fushimi are dating now she’s probably not very surprised, like she knows Yata’s had a crush on Fushimi since middle school and it’s about time those two finally got together. Yata’s still a little nervous about bringing Fushimi home though, like his mom seemed fine with it when he talked to her on the phone but who knows how she’ll be in person. Fushimi’s a little nervous too even though he’s not admitting to it, obviously there’s no point in telling his own mother (since they haven’t even talked in years) and now he’s suddenly meeting Yata’s mom not as Yata’s best friend but as Yata’s boyfriend and he’s not entirely certain that Yata’s mom won’t be upset by him somehow.

Then they get to Yata’s house and his mom greets Yata with a hug before turning to Fushimi and calling him her son too. I think Fushimi would just immediately stiffen in surprise, like his body has this automatic visceral reaction to someone calling him their son (particularly in a sincere manner, not mocking like Niki would be or cold like Kisa). Yata’s mom just strokes his hair and tells him that she’s glad to have him as part of the family. That’s when Yata finds his voice and is all embarrassed as he’s like ‘mom we haven’t gotten married yet what the hell’ and Yata’s mom just laughs and teases him a bit, like Saruhiko was in our house enough growing up what’s wrong with me calling him my son too. Yata would probably accept it pretty readily after that and in particular I can see both him and his mom smiling all fondly at Fushimi, who’s trying to recover himself and act like he doesn’t care what Yata’s mom calls him even though he’s obviously really touched. Also imagine Yata’s mom telling him that regardless of his relationship to Yata, even if they decide it doesn’t work and break up some time down the road, Yata’s mom will always think of Fushimi as part of their family. That really gets to Fushimi too, having grown up with no family and now besides Scepter 4 and Homra here he’s got Yata’s family as well, with Yata’s mom fussing over him and treating him like a child, and even as he tries to act unaffected his voice is clearly shaking as he quietly thanks her.

If Barba were a real person, you know he’d be one of those guys who gets featured on the news or at a press conference or something for even a split second and the Internet just takes his looks and runs with it. And by that, I mean Google searches trending like:

“That One Hot Attorney”

Originally posted by sofuckingchuffed

“Sharp-Dressed Lawyer”

Originally posted by minidodds

“Prettyboy Barba”

Originally posted by rafael-barbae

Or, god forbid, “Counselor Cutiepie”

Originally posted by minidodds

You’d see Buzzfeed articles on your Facebook feed like “See the Lawyer Everyone Wants to Call!” and it’s just wild. And while Carmen and the Squad are yukking up how hilarious it is that the internet has the hots for no-nonsense Barba, the man himself is just

Originally posted by allthingssvu

(He kinda feels flattered, though.)

Japanese Case Particles and Their Evil Twins!

Hey guys!

We wanted to take a moment to return to the idea of case particles and perhaps create a more refined model.

So, to review some terms real quick… 

Nouns in Japanese don’t generally decline for number (meaning that they are not explicitly plural or singular or anything in between), but they decline by case.

Grammatical case refers to a function or identity that the noun carries. In English, the pronouns decline into nominative, genitive and objective.

Nominative: He, She, They

Objective: Him, Her, Them

Genitive: His, Her, Their

Japanese marks case through particles. Indo-European languages, like English, tend to do them by suffixes that are sometimes to figure out. So we’re very lucky, in a way.


Linguists aren’t in total agreement as to how many cases Japanese has, mainly because of a few odd places one sees Japanese’s case particles. But here are the cases that are indicated.

Topical (は/wa): indicates the topic of the sentence. It exists pretty independently. 

Nominative (が/ga): indicates the subject of the sentence.

Accusative (を/wo): indicates the direct object.

Genitive (の/no): indicates possession of categorization.

Dative (に/ni): indicates the indirect object and location.

Instrumental (で/de): indicates a tool or cause.

Lative [or Locative] (へ/e): indicates direction toward.

Ablative (から/kara): indicates direction from.

Cases in any given language will tend to have multiple functions. In fact, there is a good likelihood that secondary functions of the same cases are repeated between languages. That is to say, if the accusative in Japanese can sometimes indicate motion through, it is likely that another language will have one such indication. And that is the case. There are also various “datives of manner,” which is what the “adverbial ni” actually is.


We here for now tend to talk about a topical, nominative, accusative, genitive, dative, and locative. We don’t talk about the ablative, and the idea of calling the locative lative seems to be a remnant from the old idea that Japanese is related to Uralic languages (like Finnish and Estonian.) But it works really well, so we’ll keep it around. 

(By the way, it’s generally accepted that Japanese is a language isolate. The idea of an “Altaic” family has been discredited, which I believe is a concept that was taught many years ago to Japanese (and Korean) students, so you’ll find language books claiming that Japanese (and Korean) is an Altaic language.)

The ablative, on the other hand, we’re afraid to indicate because of its “evil twin.” An “evil twin” is a counterpart to a case particle that works in a manner that is very different from the original case particle. 

We often see “kara” as a post-position (or you can call it a conjunction, it really doesn’t really matter right  now.) The thing is that it will work with an entire verb phrase, which is not okay.


Japanese Evil Twins:

から (kara): marks a cause or reason. (”because”)

が (ga): conjunction, marks that both inflexional sentences are not comparable, meaning that you wouldn’t figure that one follows from the other. (”though…”)

で (de): post-postition, marks the location of an action when the location itself is not very relevant to the action. (”at,” or “in”)

の (no): attributive copula, serves as the copula in an attribute phrase. (”…that is…”

と (to): conditional conjunction, marks that the occurrence of an action is dependent on another. (If…) 

We didn’t speak of “to,” because we are unsure if it’s a conjunction or if it is a comitative case marker. The comitative case marks that an action is done with or in the company of, which is possible in Japanese but it is rare. (E.g. 僕と行きますか? Will you go with me?)


The plot thickens:

If から is a case particle, an ablative, then まで (made) surely must be a case particle. And some have suggested to call it a “limitative” case, which would be unique to Japanese (as far as we know). But the nice thing about cases is that they’re something you can see in multiple languages, so we’re hesitant to concede that. That’s why we’d rather treat both as post-positions.

Japanese grammar tends to deal with this by calling them all “particles” and then giving them as many jobs as needed, but thinking of them all as a single grammatical unit. The bad thing about this, of course, is that then you don’t have “case” particles and it ignores the patterns seen in the case particles when compared to so many other languages.

But it is very strange that we have so many evil twins. It’s easy to dismiss one or two, but five (or six), that is a lot. The answers to all this probably lie in the history of the language, with things stemming from Old and Middle Japanese, some things most likely lost to us (things like idiomatic phrases truncated). So we’ll have to wait a while to figure it all out.


Anyway, we just thought you’d find this interesting. Food for thought.

So much of the media discussion of Trump’s Muslim ban, both in US and international media, centers around issues of terrorism: offering statistics about the infinitesimal number of refugees who are involved in terrorist activity, and decrying the ban as something that’s likely to increase the numbers of people joining ISIS and other terrorist organizations. And all of that is true, and it’s important to call out Trump’s false claims. But here’s the thing. I think most of the media is missing the actual point of the Muslim ban.

It’s not about terrorism. It never has been. By allowing the narrative to be framed that way, even in our critiques of Trump, we’re conceding a vital point. We’re buying in to the narrative that this is about terrorism, and that we’re simply debating the proper response to it. It paints a picture in which protestors and liberal media outlets are unhappy with Trump’s response to the issue.

But that’s not it at all.

The truth is we’ve seen this before. A ban on people entering the country, based on religion and / or ethnicity, is the first step. Next will come the Muslim registry. There will be a quiet purging of all Muslim employees from government jobs. Persons listed in the Muslim registry will be monitored by police “for the protection of the public.” Discrimination in hiring practices in private companies will become first legal, then actively encouraged. Muslims will be first encouraged, then coerced, and finally forced to move into segregated areas, or perhaps into protected camps or detainment facilities. People will start disappearing.

That’s what this is about. The ban is about taking that first step. Talking about terrorism only serves to lend legitimacy to Trump’s claims that this is the primary issue. But it’s not. The issue here is a white supremacist administration that actively wants to purge undesirables.

As I see it – and this is just me thinking out loud here – is if no one took the offer of $800 to get off the plane, maybe a United employee – at the gate, in the cockpit, somewhere – might have tried getting on the phone to someone higher up, and asking permission to offer more.

I mean, I get it, apparently the ticket says the airline has the right to remove passengers due to overbooking, but offering a few dollars more to four passengers versus the potential loss they face now, seems like an easy trade to make.

Of course, that’s assuming anybody could think things through before a passenger gets dragged off a plane.

Neal Cassidy Arcs We Were Robbed Of

Going back in time, seeing his father at the height of his power and madness, assuring him that they would reunited before Rumple drinks the memory potion.

Learning who Emma is all over again, rebuilding their friendship, maybe even even letting themselves be in love again, finding joy in their shared son, trading their frustrations over magic and families.

Watching his father suffer through PTSD, trying his best to help him cope and not repress what he feels, crying with Belle when he ultimately fails.

Bonding with his step mother while they awkwardly try to figure out their dynamic, are they supposed to act like a child and a mother, two friends, or something they can’t think of?

Helping his son grow into his own, especially when he becomes the Author, teaching him to be responsible and never stop fighting for his loved ones, to succeed where all the men in his family have failed.

Watching in pain as the Darkness is torn out of his father and forced into the love of his life, agonizing over whether it would twist her as terribly, wondering who she would become.

Suffering the same curse as his father and True Love, gaining a greater understanding of them both because of it, fighting demons and death itself to hold onto his humanity.

Reuniting with his birth mother in the Underworld, finding peace and closure with her, a little spark of hope as their renewed love helps her move on.

Fighting tooth and nail when he realizes he has a younger sibling on the way, promising himself this one wouldn’t have the childhood he had, helping his parents reconcile and work towards protecting the baby.

Raging at yet another cruel relative that tears his family apart, seeking every possible way to save his baby brother, breaking down with grief when he realizes Gideon had just as bad of a childhood, uniting both his family and Emma’s to defeat his grandmother, rejoicing when he can finally hug the newest member of his family.

I actually live for the commute home, when I can avoid social interaction by having Jemma Redgrave in my ears.
Bliss.