bad marketing ideas

4

Meet the culmination of bad ideas, terrible marketing, over pricing, and poor business partnerships. Otherwise known as the Pioneer LaserActive. This behemoth was released in 1993 as a “high end” gaming console poised to compete against the Phillips CD-i and the 3DO; but in a brilliant marketing move, required the consumer to purchase add-on modules in order to play games. There were several modules (called PACs) released, the most popular being the Sega Genesis/CD PAC and to a lesser degree, the NEC TurboDuo PAC. There were others released such as a karaoke and computer interface PAC, the latter allowing you to hook it up to a home computer. The LaserActive retailed for about $950 and the Sega and NEC PACs going for about $600 each, relegating it to an extremely niche market of rich kids with no friends. The LaserActive played comically oversized proprietary 8" or 12" Laserdiscs (a precursor to DVD’s) as well as standard CD’s. If you had the appropriate PAC, it also played Sega Genesis, Sega CD, TurboGrafx and TurboCD games. The console had very few exclusive games, but mostly consisted of adding FMV or cd audio to games that were already on the Genesis or TurboGrafx. Sufficed to say, it didn’t stay on the market for too long. Oddly enough, Pioneer continued making Laserdisc players all the way up to 2009 before finally retiring the format! This system definitely has an interesting history and I hope to own one someday, but it has very little to offer beyond being just a cool collection piece.

So apparently this is how we get little girls to play with LEGOs now

No, seriously.  If you don’t understand the problem with selling LEGO playsets like this, then just don’t talk to me any more.  I don’t know where to BEGIN with what’s wrong here.  It’s so very offensive to the core of my being.  It lacks imagination and is downright insulting to the very demographic these are being marketed to, which is a REAL FEAT for a toy which is known to boost creativity and spacial skills.