bacterial colony

You’re a scientist studying bacterial colonies. One day, you look under the microscope to observe strange shapes that, on a closer look, resemble letters. The bacteria are greeting you and have a message for you.

devillikeme  asked:

Is it possible to have a betta tank without real plants? In my understanding the bacteria is in the substrate and filter. I mean the tank would still have decoration and fake plants and my tank is planted, but I kinda wanna know for next time since I had a pretty bad fight with my parents over this is and I'm super new to the hobby (plus I'm terrible with plants. not intentionally just bad luck)

It’s entirely possible! Live plants aide in the detoxification of waste and help keep parameters under control, because they readily feed on ammonia, but that’s just the plus of having live plants. You can have fake plants and still have a healthy bacterial colony~

anonymous asked:

Considering that humans can deliver a bite strong enough to sever a finger, how effective would a bite be against an assailant trying to put you in a headlock? Would biting the arm be enough to make them let go?

Assuming the arm was in a position you could get to? Yes. Given a little time and the inclination, you can completely destroy someone’s arm (or, really, just about any body part,) with your teeth. The difficult part isn’t biting chunks out of someone’s arm, it’s being willing to bite chunks out of someone’s arm.

Think of it this way; your teeth are there to remove meat from bone, and they’re actually pretty good at doing it. On top of that, humans are one of the worst kinds of bites to receive. We build up some really nasty bacterial colonies in our mouths, and applying them to an open wound is a recipe for infection. Our immune systems (usually) recognize and know how to handle our own colonies. But, those are unique to an individual, so if you’re bitten by someone else, there’s no immunity, and the results are very unpleasant.

The hard part here is actually being willing to chow down on someone else. There’s a lot of social and psychological conditioning telling you not to bite fellow human beings.

The thing is, that conditioning is there to protect you. Exposure to blood is a fantastic vector for all kinds of illnesses that are otherwise non-transmittable. Some forms of viral Hepatitis and HIV are the big ticket items here; but, given the choice, there are many reasons to never touch a random stranger’s blood, much less gargle it.

So, you need to be willing to actually push past your own self preservation instincts, which is much harder than it sounds.

You also need to be willing to commit to seriously injuring your opponent. That’s a much easier threshold to hit, but combining it with the ability to shuck self preservation to mangle your opponent creates a weird paradox.

There’s a strand of combat philosophy that advocates rapid brutal escalation. Literally, “the best defense is a good offense.” You can see elements of this in a lot of the armed self defense forms. The problem is, outside of very extreme circumstances, biting someone takes the defense part of that equation out at the knees. You’re not using rapid escalation to protect yourself from attack, because you’re exposing yourself to far more potential harm now.

Now, obviously, you can end up with characters that have no problem taking out someone else’s throat with their teeth. But, that’s a rather singular kind of brutality. I did talk about the combat applications of brutality awhile back. So, that might be worth reading, if you haven’t seen it.

-Starke

4

Nature to illuminate research

Here you can see fireflies, a type of beetle that glows.

Bioluminescence is the production and emission of light from enzymes called luciferases. In nature, many organisms such as jellyfish and fireflies ‘glow’ using these enzymes. 

In scientific research, bioluminescent proteins are used to monitor changes to cells. 

In the bottom images around 7000 bacterial colonies have been printed on an agar plate.The bacteria have been genetically engineered to display the bioluminescent enzyme from the firefly Photinus pyralis

The images were taken with a sensitive camera which can detect the light output from luciferase in each colony. The light output of different types of luciferase can be analysed to discover which ones have enhanced characteristics that could be used in research.

Image credits: Terry Priest, s58y, Cassandra Stowe