backstage documentary

Jay-Z, DJ Clue?, DMX, Method Man and Redman, photographed showing off their Gold and Platinum plaques backstage during the “Hard Knock Life Tour” by Barry Roden in March 1999. 

The star-studded 54-date tour grossed $18 million and suffered no cancellations (in fact, it added 17 extra dates during its cross-country trek to meet the high demand), no artist drop-offs, or any incidents of violence—completely silencing the mainstream critics who believed a purely rap tour of its magnitude couldn’t be done. “People were saying someone’s going to die on that tour,” Damon Dash recalled in an interview with Entertainment Weekly in May 1999, but after 11 weeks on the road, playing in sold-out arenas from Canada to Texas, ”there was no violence and no fights.” Declaring it “the most successful hip-hop tour ever,” Dash unabashedly went on to say, ”we set a precedent not just for rap tours, but for all music tours.” Jigga would add this about whether he was surprised the tour unfolded without fan violence: “Anytime you get a large group of people in one building together, whether it’s rock ‘n’ roll, country music, whatever it is, there’s always a chance for violence, there’s always a chance for something happening. We didn’t believe the music would contribute to that.”

Jay and X would donate their proceeds from the Denver stop of the tour to help the families of the victims of the Columbine tragedy. “We decided to donate the proceeds from this show as soon as we saw the date on the schedule. We’ve known first hand how pointless and senseless violence always is, and we wanted to show our support in a real way” Jay said of the decision.

The tour was chronicled in the September 2000 documentary film Backstage, featuring live performances by the tour’s roster and an in-depth look at the events backstage. The film grossed $496,226 at the box office during opening weekend; and made over $1.2 million during its four-week run. It was released on DVD in February 2001, and is available for purchase or streaming.

Presented by DJ Clue?, the majority of the soundtrack Backstage: A Hard Knock Life was recorded on tour buses while the acts traveled around North America. The album was certified Gold by the RIAA three months after its release.

In an interview with MTV in October 1999 Hov said he wouldn’t be against recreating the tour at the top of 2000 to support the artists new projects: “Well, the same people are [releasing new albums] at the same time. DMX comes out, myself comes out, Method Man, Redman, we all come out. So hopefully we be as hot and we try and do it all over again.” “But,” he added, “you can only make history once.”

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EXO - 170306 Exoplanet #3 - The EXO’rDium in Japan DVD - Backstage Documentary preview

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Rock Band AU
  • Their band name is The Last Glaives
  • you’re assigned to film the backstage documentary, so you get to see the real them while they’re touring
  • Noctis is the main vocalist, he writes the music and is the most popular member of the band
  • Prompto is the backup vocalist + plays the Bass
  • “Because nobody notices if u make mistakes on the Bass!”
  • he and Noct are always in interviews together because Noct is bad at public speaking and Prompto is AWESOME at it
  • they’re always memeing on their official profiles, it’s how the idea of the band started in the first place
  • the band first went viral because Prompto accidentally posted a backstage snapchat story publicly where his prank backfired and the black chocobo pecked him in the crotch
  • he’s always embarrassed about it, but it launched them into fame overnight so all is good!
  • Nyx is on the Guitar, a solo musician who uses a discontinued vintage model which he named Galahd, the gorgeous instrument is always with him in every publicity photo and is as famous as he is
  • “I’m a temporary member since the band changes guitarists every tour, are you sure you should be filming me?”
  • Gladio plays the drums and is the only one who can keep up with the messy way Noct writes the parts
  • sometimes dyes his mohawk flame red so when he whips his head around during his solos it looks like a phoenix coming alive onstage
  • “I just love pounding on the drums, you know? You don’t get to let loose and be yourself in a normal day job.”
  • Ignis used to be the permanent Guitarist but a terrible car accident injured his playing arm and left him with a face full of scars, he stopped playing on stage after that.
  • right now he’s focusing on being the manager of the group’s activities
  • He deals with the businessy side of the band, taking care of contracts and sponsorships, and the complicated reports to the agency about their activities and progress.
  • He’s the persistent voice in Noctis’ ear when it’s time to stop procrastinating and to start writing on that new song or album
  • “Sometimes I have to help him find inspiration in other works, or by showing him how happy he makes his fans with every new piece. Other times, it is straight up bullying him to put down that video game and get in the studio.”
  • Prompto’s favorite part is when the fans go crazy at the sight of him, the screaming and flustered chaos before a song is what gives him life
  • Noct’s favorite part is the singing, especially when the audience have memorized the lyrics and are singing it with him
  • Ignis is surprisingly popular considering he only showed up for a few early songs, he blames “the cliche character traits” he falls into with the glasses and suit
  • he’s not aware that he’s really attractive even outside the character trope and even with the scars on his face, he just can’t see it!
  • no pun intended
  • at first Gladio seems under appreciated musically, because nobody notices the importance of the drums in a live performance, but he’s okay with it
  • “it’s just fun to play a gig with my buddies and get it right every single time!”
  • he’s super popular on fanblogs though, so who cares what snobby magazines think!
  • Nyx is relatively older than the rest of them and actually belongs to a different agency, but the group has no permanent guitarist and his schedule was open
  • their music is always upbeat and intense and he liked it, but he was never one to stick with any one band for too long
  • The running theme of their music is the need to bring back the light to a gloomy world, and they’re the warriors who would do it if it cost them their lives
  • the fans don’t realize it, but Noct actually has a chronic illness that flares up one time while you’re filming and you catch the whole ordeal on tape
  • it starts off like a panic attack where he can’t breathe, which makes it difficult to actually sing his lines and they end up having an unscheduled intermission
  • but it continues to escalate to the point where he can’t hold himself upright without assistance, his knees buckle from under him and his headaches get really bad
  • you film Ignis trying to convince him to cancel the rest of the night’s show but he wouldn’t disappoint the fans like that, and pushes through with sheer willpower
  • Prompto is crying and worried for his friend’s life, even though “It happened before but it’s still hella scary!”
  • Gladio slaps Noct on the back in encouragement and helps him back to the stage to finish the night
  • “Noct’s stubborn, so I might as well support his dumb decisions. at least this way i’ll be there to catch him before he falls.” 
  • Nyx is concerned but entertained by the whole fiasco since nobody actually died “it’s like that time I toured with Libertus and he fell off stage but insisted on finishing the concert with his leg in a fresh cast.”
  • at the end of the show you ask Ignis if you should cut this part out of the documentary, and he considers your words for a while.
  • eventually he tells you to keep it in, the fans need to see how hard they’re is working for the world’s happiness
  • it started off as just another job but now you’re really in love with all these boys and their music is bomb!
  • somehow Noct gets you into filming a documentary about his fiance’s career: “The Heavenly Oracle”, an opera prodigy and her pianist brother.

Jay-Z, photographed performing during the first of two “Hard Knock Life Tour” shows at the Thomas & Mack Center in Las Vegas on April 18, 1999.

The star-studded 54-date tour grossed $18 million and suffered no cancellations (in fact, it added 17 extra dates during its cross-country trek to meet the high demand), no artist drop-offs, or any incidents of violence—completely silencing the mainstream critics who believed a purely rap tour of its magnitude couldn’t be done. “People were saying someone’s going to die on that tour,” Damon Dash recalled in an interview with Entertainment Weekly in May 1999, but after 11 weeks on the road, playing in sold-out arenas from Canada to Texas, ”there was no violence and no fights.” Declaring it “the most successful hip-hop tour ever,” Dash unabashedly went on to say, ”we set a precedent not just for rap tours, but for all music tours.” Jigga would add this about whether he was surprised the tour unfolded without fan violence: “Anytime you get a large group of people in one building together, whether it’s rock ‘n’ roll, country music, whatever it is, there’s always a chance for violence, there’s always a chance for something happening. We didn’t believe the music would contribute to that.”

Jay and X would donate their proceeds from the Denver stop of the tour to help the families of the victims of the Columbine tragedy. “We decided to donate the proceeds from this show as soon as we saw the date on the schedule. We’ve known first hand how pointless and senseless violence always is, and we wanted to show our support in a real way” Jay said of the decision.

The tour was chronicled in the September 2000 documentary film Backstage, featuring live performances by the tour’s roster and an in-depth look at the events backstage. The film grossed $496,226 at the box office during opening weekend; and made over $1.2 million during its four-week run. It was released on DVD in February 2001, and is available for purchase or streaming.

Presented by DJ Clue?, the majority of the soundtrack Backstage: A Hard Knock Life was recorded on tour buses while the acts traveled around North America. The album was certified Gold by the RIAA three months after its release.

In an interview with MTV in October 1999 Hov said he wouldn’t be against recreating the tour at the top of 2000 to support the artists new projects: “Well, the same people are [releasing new albums] at the same time. DMX comes out, myself comes out, Method Man, Redman, we all come out. So hopefully we be as hot and we try and do it all over again… But you can only make history once.”

Jay-Z, photographed performing during the first of two “ Hard Knock Life Tour” shows at the Thomas & Mack Center in Las Vegas on April 18, 1999.

The star-studded 54-date tour grossed $18 million and suffered no cancellations (in fact, it added 17 extra dates during its cross-country trek to meet the high demand), no artist drop-offs, or any incidents of violence—completely silencing the mainstream critics who believed a purely rap tour of its magnitude couldn’t be done. “People were saying someone’s going to die on that tour,” Damon Dash recalled in an interview with Entertainment Weekly in May 1999, but after 11 weeks on the road, playing in sold-out arenas from Canada to Texas, ”there was no violence and no fights.” Declaring it “the most successful hip-hop tour ever,” Dash unabashedly went on to say, ”we set a precedent not just for rap tours, but for all music tours.” Jigga would add this about whether he was surprised the tour unfolded without fan violence: “Anytime you get a large group of people in one building together, whether it’s rock ‘n’ roll, country music, whatever it is, there’s always a chance for violence, there’s always a chance for something happening. We didn’t believe the music would contribute to that.”

Jay and X would donate their proceeds from the Denver stop of the tour to help the families of the victims of the Columbine tragedy. “We decided to donate the proceeds from this show as soon as we saw the date on the schedule. We’ve known first hand how pointless and senseless violence always is, and we wanted to show our support in a real way” Jay said of the decision.

The tour was chronicled in the September 2000 documentary film Backstage, featuring live performances by the tour’s roster and an in-depth look at the events backstage. The film grossed $496,226 at the box office during opening weekend; and made over $1.2 million during its four-week run. It was released on DVD in February 2001, and is available for purchase or streaming.

Presented by DJ Clue?, the majority of the soundtrack Backstage: A Hard Knock Life was recorded on tour buses while the acts traveled around North America. The album was certified Gold by the RIAA three months after its release.

In an interview with MTV in October 1999 Hov said he wouldn’t be against recreating the tour at the top of 2000 to support the artists new projects: “Well, the same people are [releasing new albums] at the same time. DMX comes out, myself comes out, Method Man, Redman, we all come out. So hopefully we be as hot and we try and do it all over again… But you can only make history once.”